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Tight crochet
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Aug 17, 2012 09:39:46   #
julielovespurple
 
I've been crocheting for i guess almost 6 months, and I've found that I'm a very tight crocheter. Whenever I have a pattern, even though i have the right gauge yarn for the suggested hook, I end up realizing I need bigger and bigger crochet hooks. Is this a normal thing, or does anyone have any suggestions for how i can stop crocheting so tightly?
 
Aug 17, 2012 10:49:00   #
Kyba
 
Relax? Go all loosy goosey? Don't hold the yarn too tight? Give a little tug on the loop after you tug it thru?
Aug 17, 2012 12:10:36   #
Thepw_927
 
I crochet tight as well. It has been almost two years since I’ve learned and try as I might, I can’t seem to loosen up. However, it is not as tight as it used to be. I like how neat the stitches look so… I usually go up two needle sizes when following a pattern.
Aug 18, 2012 05:49:26   #
Leonora
 
The answer to your problem is down to how relaxed you are when crocheting. I used to be like that many years ago, but I taught myself to become totally relaxed when doing crochet, that now my gauge is usually 100% right for any given project. To help you relax, why don't you put some really soft relaxing music on to listen too in the background, and see if that will help. Leonora.
Aug 18, 2012 07:32:02   #
threekidsmom
 
I crochet tightly, too. Have been crocheting 40 years and still crochet tightly. The stitches look neater, IMHO, but it makes stuff heavier. I knit tightly, too. I guess I am just an uptight son of a gun!
Aug 18, 2012 08:39:08   #
morningstar (a regular here)
 
All the above advice is right on. You probably know that some find it helps to do the foundation chain with a larger hook and then, with the next size down, when continuing the pattern. Keep those loops loose as you pull them through. Each row is forming the foundation for the next. If you keep each row loose, the hook will slide through easily. Don't give up. It's only a hook and some yarn so...relax and enjoy.
 
Aug 18, 2012 09:21:13   #
past
 
Do you also knit tightly? If not, then are you holding your yarn the same when you crochet as you do when you knit? I used to crochet tightly when I first learned. I would often knit and crochet with my Grammy and one day she asked me why I held my yarn differently when I crocheted than when I knitted. She said I should hold it the same way and my crocheting eased up almost immediately.
Aug 18, 2012 09:45:12   #
kknott4957
 
is's perfectly normal to crochet too tight when you're first learning. Tension is a matter of practice, practice, practice. I always tell people I'm teaching to crochet that it's better to start out using a bigger needle than the pattern calls for. Most of the time they end up getting the correct gague because of how tight they crochet. just be patient and most of all relax. This is a hobby not a contest, don't stress about how you make your stitches.
Aug 18, 2012 10:04:42   #
nbaker
 
When teaching someone to crochet I like to point out that the loop needs to lightly (not tightly) size up to the wider part of the hook, not the throat right under the hook. The hook is the same size as the shaft to allow the hook to easily slip through the loop for the next stitch.

If you tighten the yarn loop to size to the throat of the hook it will not slip easily through the loop to make the stitch and will be difficult to slip into to make the stitch on the next row.

The other misconception I teach is the meaning of 'tension'. Tension does not mean to make tight. It means to hold the yarn/thread even and steady with only as much pull as is necessary to keep the thread/yarn from being slack/loose in order to best work with the hook/needle.
(For those with a sewing machine think about what happens if the tension knob gets kicked up to 10 without your knowledge. The machine will only sew knots and break the thread.)

Do these two things and everything is easier.

I hope this explanation is helpful. NB
Aug 18, 2012 13:01:38   #
SAMkewel (a regular here)
 
nbaker wrote:
When teaching someone to crochet I like to point out that the loop needs to lightly (not tightly) size up to the wider part of the hook, not the throat right under the hook. The hook is the same size as the shaft to allow the hook to easily slip through the loop for the next stitch.

If you tighten the yarn loop to size to the throat of the hook it will not slip easily through the loop to make the stitch and will be difficult to slip into to make the stitch on the next row.

The other misconception I teach is the meaning of 'tension'. Tension does not mean to make tight. It means to hold the yarn/thread even and steady with only as much pull as is necessary to keep the thread/yarn from being slack/loose in order to best work with the hook/needle.
(For those with a sewing machine think about what happens if the tension knob gets kicked up to 10 without your knowledge. The machine will only sew knots and break the thread.)

Do these two things and everything is easier.

I hope this explanation is helpful. NB
When teaching someone to crochet I like to point o... (show quote)


I've been crocheting for six months and seem to be past the above problems, but want to say that I wish you had been my teacher or that I had been given the above advice by someone :~D. It sure would have made life a lot easier!
Aug 18, 2012 14:33:10   #
colonialcat
 
when i learned to crochet from my grand mother she reminded each time i made the stitch to tight until i got what she said , she was a task master do it right or don't do it at all.
but when its tight you have a hard time getting it off the hook into next stitch relax it is easier to do when one is relaxed with crocheting
I didnt learn to crochet till i was in my early 40's when Grandmas got very tired of having to do shell stitch around baby items i had knit so it was one day she sat me down and we learned to do it. took me a bit of concentration to do it less tight like knitting remember when we learned to knit how tight it was same idea good luck
 
Aug 18, 2012 16:00:27   #
mochamarie
 
threekidsmom wrote:
I crochet tightly, too. Have been crocheting 40 years and still crochet tightly. The stitches look neater, IMHO, but it makes stuff heavier. I knit tightly, too. I guess I am just an uptight son of a gun!


Yes, this would describe me, too! I feel that it doesn't matter too much as long as you adjust the hook to get the correct gauge. You have to crochet tight enough to see the pattern anyway. Someone I used to work with crocheted so loosely that you couldn't even see the design and it looked like a mess. So whatever works for you, carry on and enjoy!
Aug 18, 2012 16:43:42   #
susiebearsie
 
I used to knit and crochet very tightly. I taught myself to relax it's fun not work!! I also changed how i hold the yarn, just because you were taught a certain way doesn't mean you can't change to better suit your needs.
Aug 19, 2012 08:35:15   #
ardeanhubbard
 
try holding your yarn a little bit looser in your left hand and it might loosen up a little bit.
Aug 22, 2012 14:01:04   #
julielovespurple
 
past wrote:
Do you also knit tightly? If not, then are you holding your yarn the same when you crochet as you do when you knit? I used to crochet tightly when I first learned. I would often knit and crochet with my Grammy and one day she asked me why I held my yarn differently when I crocheted than when I knitted. She said I should hold it the same way and my crocheting eased up almost immediately.


I thought about that, but i actually have pretty accurate knitting gauge for the most part.
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