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kitchener stitch or 3 needle bind off?
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Aug 30, 2012 14:18:21   #
mhoopingarner
 
I am knitting a shrug that joins together with a seam down the back which has 114 stitches. The pattern suggests the kitchener stitch but I have been thinking about doing a 3 needle bind off? What should I do?
 
Aug 30, 2012 14:43:55   #
kaixixang (a regular here)
 
I'd say go for it. You won't feel a seem underneath...I use the 3-needle-bindoff for toes on socks.
Aug 30, 2012 18:58:19   #
kacey64
 
The 3-needle bind off leaves a welt. For that reeason, the kitcener stitch would be a better choice.
Aug 30, 2012 19:07:47   #
pin_happy
 
Agreed with kacey64.
Aug 30, 2012 19:25:21   #
IndigoSpinner (a regular here)
 
The way to decide is: Do you want a seam down the center of the back?

Three needle bind off leaves what looks like a seam on both sides. You'll be able to see what looks like the wrong side of a seam on the inside, and the right side of a seam on the outside. Kitchner stitch will also have the same stretchiness as the rest of the back, whereas three needle bind off won't be as stretchy, so when you move, it will tend to pull.

If you hesitate to Kitchner stitch because you haven't done much of it, maybe you should practice first. knit two swatches and Kitchner them together. Then rip it out and do it again until you're comfortable with doing it and are achieving an invisible join.
Aug 31, 2012 05:17:42   #
peachy51
 
lostarts wrote:
The way to decide is: Do you want a seam down the center of the back?

Three needle bind off leaves what looks like a seam on both sides. You'll be able to see what looks like the wrong side of a seam on the inside, and the right side of a seam on the outside. Kitchner stitch will also have the same stretchiness as the rest of the back, whereas three needle bind off won't be as stretchy, so when you move, it will tend to pull.

If you hesitate to Kitchner stitch because you haven't done much of it, maybe you should practice first. knit two swatches and Kitchner them together. Then rip it out and do it again until you're comfortable with doing it and are achieving an invisible join.
The way to decide is: Do you want a seam down the ... (show quote)


I agree with all of this. It also depends on your yarn. If you are using a really stretchy yarn, you might want to do the 3-needle bindoff to give it more structure to keep it from stretching at the middle of the back. But you will see the seam.

Personally, I love the kitchener stitch and would probably use it.
 
Aug 31, 2012 05:49:44   #
kiwiannie
 
I always use the 3 needle cast off. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Aug 31, 2012 08:42:18   #
Loramarin
 
I agree with Lostarts. Kitchner is the way to go. It will be invisable and this is a seam down the center of your back. Three needle bindoff is great for shoulders where stability is necessary. I think it will ruin the integrity of the design to have a big bulky seam down your back. Kitchner in stockinette is easy to do once you get the hang of the repeat. It will give your garment a professional look.
Aug 31, 2012 09:44:36   #
Pam in LR
 
That's a lot of kitchener stitches! I'd have to do it in "fits and starts" - ten or so stitches this morning, ten or so more this evening. It wouldn't upset me to spend a week on the best looking join for the shawl.
Aug 31, 2012 10:30:14   #
Ronie (a regular here)
 
I think we stay away from the Kitchener Stitch because its complicated. I think if you do as LostArts and the others have suggested and practice the Kitchener stitch on a swatch that once you get it you will be much happier, and it wont take that long once you get going... I think a online class that teaches us to do the fine finishing would be wonderful. I am sure there are some out there.. Just not sure my budget at this time will allow a class like that.
Aug 31, 2012 11:00:37   #
Loramarin
 
watch and learn mantra "knit purl, purl knit,
http://www.knittinghelp.com/video/play/kitchener-stitch
 
Aug 31, 2012 11:50:47   #
AuntKnitty
 
Kitchener definitely. It's worth the time involved and really, once you get it, it's just a rhythmical as knitting.

I have a little "mantra" too as Loramarin suggested "knit off, purl. Purl off, knit."

Easy peasey. Now a 3 needle bind off...that's hard for me! ;)
Aug 31, 2012 12:55:52   #
denisejh
 
Since I'm Kitchener stitch impaired. I would use the three needle bind off. Denise
Aug 31, 2012 13:24:09   #
leahkay
 
Loramarin, thanls for the video link! It makes the Kitchner stitch easy to remember.
Aug 31, 2012 13:27:00   #
YorkieMama
 
mhoopingarner wrote:
I am knitting a shrug that joins together with a seam down the back which has 114 stitches. The pattern suggests the kitchener stitch but I have been thinking about doing a 3 needle bind off? What should I do?


Kitchener Stitch is the way to go in my opinion. It may take a while to do that many stitches but it will be worth it. After all the time you invested in the knitting you don't want to have a "loving hands at home" look to your garment.
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