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Teaching Kids to Knit
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Page: 1 2 next>>
Sep 21, 2012 08:22:01   #
baileysmom
 
Hi All,

As mentioned I am trying to get better to teach my 8 yr. granddaughter; however, yesterday she asked me if she could knit. It wasn't a great knitting day for me, so I told her I would get her some needles and we would start another day. Can somebody tell me what size to start her with and should I do the cast on for her? I thought she would make a dolly blanket or discloths for mom for christmas. Any help is appreciated. I can teach her knit and purl, but that's about it. Maybe we will just have a knitting day each week.
 
Sep 21, 2012 08:41:25   #
druidsgirl
 
I was taught on about 4mm needles and with Double knitting as it was not too bulky for my wee fingers and not too fine and fiddly. For a start it may be easier to work with just the knit or just the purl stitch and do a piggy square (which if she anything like me at 8 years old will be anything BUT square) and knit that dolly blanket you are thinking of. Wool rather than cotton as for a start she will need the stretch and give. Have fun!
Sep 21, 2012 09:34:40   #
Catarry
 
I teach knitting to kids at a craft store. The store's arrangement with the yarn manufacturer calls for bulky yarn and size 11 needles.
From my experience, I think that's too bulky. I prefer size 9s and a heavy worsted weight, and when I teach kids privately, that's what I use.
I'd also try to have both metal and bamboo needles on hand. Metals let the yarn slide more easily, of course, and bamboo is more grippy. Once your GD starts, you'll be able to change if she loses stitches or if she has trouble getting them off the needle.
Finally, I find it helps some kids to anchor the right needle against their right thigh or in their lap.
I'm in favor of doing whatever is necessary to help the child get knitting...I often skip casting on until the second or third lesson just to let them work knit and purl stitches in class and on their own.
Best of luck (And I also use the little knitting ditty...I use this version:
In through the front door,
Loop around the back,
Out through the window,
Off jumps Jack.)
Sep 21, 2012 09:37:58   #
baileysmom
 
Catarry wrote:
I teach knitting to kids at a craft store. The store's arrangement with the yarn manufacturer calls for bulky yarn and size 11 needles.
From my experience, I think that's too bulky. I prefer size 9s and a heavy worsted weight, and when I teach kids privately, that's what I use.
I'd also try to have both metal and bamboo needles on hand. Metals let the yarn slide more easily, of course, and bamboo is more grippy. Once your GD starts, you'll be able to change if she loses stitches or if she has trouble getting them off the needle.
Finally, I find it helps some kids to anchor the right needle against their right thigh or in their lap.
I'm in favor of doing whatever is necessary to help the child get knitting...I often skip casting on until the second or third lesson just to let them work knit and purl stitches in class and on their own.
Best of luck (And I also use the little knitting ditty...I use this version:
In through the front door,
Loop around the back,
Out through the window,
Off jumps Jack.)
I teach knitting to kids at a craft store. The st... (show quote)


Thank you both for the help. I am on my way to Wal-Mart to get yarn for dishcloths and needles for Genna.
Sep 21, 2012 09:55:06   #
margaretcave
 
Good luck with the teaching - I am sure she will pick it up quickly. Tell her that when she has done a dishcloth you will post it on the forum for all the ladies to see - she will be so proud and we would love to see how she progresses.
Sep 21, 2012 10:14:51   #
baileysmom
 
margaretcave wrote:
Good luck with the teaching - I am sure she will pick it up quickly. Tell her that when she has done a dishcloth you will post it on the forum for all the ladies to see - she will be so proud and we would love to see how she progresses.


Thank you, maybe I should do the same. She will probably be much better than I am. I think my confidence is lacking a bit. So much trouble, but I keep at it and I'm just doing basics.
 
Sep 22, 2012 05:47:22   #
Jeya (a regular here)
 
I taught kids between 7 and 11 years old and I started off with casting on for all of them. I found using 4mm needles with 4-ply yarn effective. Encourage them to use light or multi-colored yarn. Just make them use knit stitch , helped them focus on the holding the needles. Just watching those little fingers knitting away was a joy. Hand knitting will not be a thing of the past.
Sep 22, 2012 07:40:38   #
baileysmom
 
Jeya wrote:
I taught kids between 7 and 11 years old and I started off with casting on for all of them. I found using 4mm needles with 4-ply yarn effective. Encourage them to use light or multi-colored yarn. Just make them use knit stitch , helped them focus on the holding the needles. Just watching those little fingers knitting away was a joy. Hand knitting will not be a thing of the past.


Thanks for the tip. I bought 8, 9, and 10 shorts, I'll go get something smaller.
Sep 22, 2012 08:38:36   #
Loramarin
 
When teaching a first time knitter I use worsted weight wool or yarn with some elasticity. Some Acrylics are just too stiff and it makes it harder. I also like a good needle with a point, not plastic.
Sep 22, 2012 08:42:14   #
fstknitter
 
Keep the eights....use worsted weight . Her dish cloth or blankie will be finished faster on the bigger needle giving her a sense of accomplishment.
Sep 22, 2012 08:47:54   #
baileysmom
 
fstknitter wrote:
Keep the eights....use worsted weight . Her dish cloth or blankie will be finished faster on the bigger needle giving her a sense of accomplishment.


Thank you, I'll keep all 3 as they can in a set. Perhaps that is what I should do.
 
Sep 22, 2012 10:11:51   #
jinjin
 
I like Gigi's (Knitmoregirls)rhyme for teaching kids to knit.
Stab 'em, choke 'em, drag 'em, throw 'em.
Sep 22, 2012 10:17:46   #
baileysmom
 
jinjin wrote:
I like Gigi's (Knitmoregirls)rhyme for teaching kids to knit.
Stab 'em, choke 'em, drag 'em, throw 'em.


Well, I'm not sure I like that for kids, but it certainly would work for me. Since both her parents are paramedics, I don't think it would be good to teach her that and teaching it to kids, not sure.
Sep 22, 2012 10:45:11   #
grannyfabulous4
 
I taught my GD to knit this past summer and made one mistake in my teaching. I taught her to knit first and let her do just that to make a dishrag. The next day I taught her to purl. She doesn't like to purl and after about an hour put the knitting down. I would suggest teaching both knit and purl right away. She likes the look of the ss, but doesn't like to do the purling.
Sep 22, 2012 10:58:25   #
baileysmom
 
grannyfabulous4 wrote:
I taught my GD to knit this past summer and made one mistake in my teaching. I taught her to knit first and let her do just that to make a dishrag. The next day I taught her to purl. She doesn't like to purl and after about an hour put the knitting down. I would suggest teaching both knit and purl right away. She likes the look of the ss, but doesn't like to do the purling.


I thnk a lot of people don't like to purl, I don't mind it. She's happy I bought her needles.
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