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ten stitch blanket - frustration
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Jun 12, 2011 06:42:21   #
patact
 
I am new to this site and really have enjoyed so much about the community.
In looking over previous posts, I found a link I followed regarding the ten stitch blanket. I loved the way it looked, and figured that it would be a great way to use up some of my stash. Comments spoke about it being easy to do, once you got the hang of the pattern. Well, I cannot figure out the pattern well enough to get the raised edges. I checked on you tube, and the only video is in German, plus that knitter is so speedy, even after MANY viewings, I still don't get it. Does anyone have suggestions or can steer me to a site where I can learn the trick to this blanket?
Thank you.
 
Jun 12, 2011 08:44:38   #
hildy3
 
Hi Patach...I copied that same pattern, but have not tried it yet. Are you making the circular one? Will be watching for replies to you so I will know, too. :roll: Thanks for the post..Hildy
Jun 12, 2011 09:28:26   #
patact
 
Honestly, Iloveboth of the patterns, and have tried both, but then I get stuck because I can't figure out the joining. There is also a video on YouTube for the circular one, but it is also German. Hopefully, we'll both hear from people who have had success with this blanket.
Jun 12, 2011 14:42:46   #
siouxann
 
Waiting with both of you. The pattern is intriguing in all of its forms. One of the pictures looks like the knitter used Noro yarn. Beautiful!
Jun 12, 2011 15:46:44   #
patact
 
I agree about the Noro, but that would be SO pricey. Right now I want to try it using various skeins I have, and then make one out of Noro in the future. What I've read on various sites is that ONCE you learn the tough part of the pAttern, it is a simple and 'mindless' knitting experience. Other comments have included comments that the pattern is not clearly written, and has stumped experienced knitters who have looked at it. I am sure when it is finally clear to me it will be a 'DUH!' or an "ah-ha" moment. Waiting to smack myself in the forehead when the revelation appears here. I hope.
:-o
Jun 13, 2011 07:05:54   #
beadness
 
I have not knit this blanket myself yet, but it is next on my list of things to make. I've been collecting some tips on how to make it. Not sure where I found this, probably one of the Ravelry forums. Since it was online, I don't think there is a problem if I post the notes here:

Doowicky > notebook > projects > 10 Stitch Blanket (detailed comments)

First the yarn: It is a single (not plyed) and it’s splitty, a tad more thick/thin than I’d like, and I did come across two slubs I had to bypass plus a knot in my first skein. However! The color changes are well-executed in the dyeing and once you get used to working with the splitty aspect, the yarn is nice to work with. I have not come across any more of those long slubs since (knock on wood), it may have just been that one skein.

The pattern consists of two types of knitting. You have to pay judicious attention to the corners, because every row is different (short rowing). I mark off every “row-pair” (more about that later). The other knitting type is the straightaways between the corners. That part is TV knitting, and its duration gets longer and longer as you progress on the “spiral” effect. I really like knitting this project, it can be very addicting.

First Tip: Re-write the corner instructions. The author gives row-by-row instructions (very nice of her to have added that!) but it makes for 34 separate row instructions, all of which are the same two row pattern except for the number of knit stitches in each row. I condensed it by combining the pairs of rows onto one line (row 1 and row 2 go together, rows 3 and 4 go together, etc.). In fact, I condensed yet further once I memorized the wrap/turn instructions so that my written corner stitching guide now simply reads…
8/9
7/8
6/7 (and so on down to…
1/1 which is the one row where you don’t slip the first stitch, and is also the halfway point between the two sides of the corner.
Then…
1/2
2/3
3/4… and so on back up to 8/9, whereupon your corner is finished and you begin on the straightaway again. (If you look at the pattern, you’ll understand.) It was just heaps easier to find my place, and mark off each row pair, using this abbreviated format.

Second tip: The pattern calls for slipping the first stitch in every other row. She refers to the “bumps” that are left, which you will use for pick-up-and-knit on a later spiral portion. I quickly found those bumps not to be ideal for the pickup-and-knits you will be doing throughout the building of the spiral. I began slipping that first stitch purlwise, which leaves a nice, easily-recognizable chain edge. THE RIDGES LOOK THE SAME EITHER WAY and they are much more attractive in person than in photo. But purlwise, you can readily see which chain pair of strands you’ve used before and stab into the next one consistently, every row.

Third Tip: A BIGGIE! These are only ten-stitch rows. You are turning your work constantly. This threatened to undermine my enjoyment of this project as soon as I had enough bulk completed. I was working with KnitPicks Harmony Interchangeable needles (the tips attached by a cord for circulars) which is what I use for straight knitting also. Normal size straights would have started annoying me just as much. It finally dawned on me that if I removed the cable, my tips were more than adequate lengths (in fact perfect!) for this short of a row! (See Photos 2 and 3). I attached tip guards to the cable-screw ends but with only 10 sts. you could do without them no problem.

Oh, a HUGE boon that was. I don’t have to turn the entire work, at all. Ever. Just the edge I’m working on. It simply flips back and forth and the short needles flip easily with it. No matter how big this project gets, it can remain a folded blanket in your lap. You’re only working with one edge. You don’t need to own the whole set of interchangeables, you could order just one set of tips in the size needle you’re working with. (I really think it’s well worth it even if you’d never use them again.)

So with those discoveries and modifications, I’m really enjoying this project, and I’ve accepted any trade-offs in the yarn in order to get the gorgeous color changes they achieved in the dyeing. I have read not to put a project in this yarn in the dryer, so that’s your call should you use this yarn, either in the “mini” grist or in the Mochi “Plus” grist. Same fiber in both.

I hope these tips and project note will help someone, it’s a project you do need to get used to doing, but once you do, it can be very relaxing and addicting knitting.
 
Jun 13, 2011 07:54:38   #
bae
 
Am so glad others are having problems...this has frustrated me so I just thought not advanced enough to do...will keep watching this post...and keep trying...
Jun 13, 2011 08:00:18   #
siouxann
 
Beadness, THANK YOU so much for these detailed notes!!! I have printed them off and will keep them in the same folder with the blanket instructions. You took a lot of time to be very clear, and I appreciate your thoroughness. Thanks again, Sue
Jun 13, 2011 10:08:31   #
waya
 
Patact,
I retyped the pattern I used the suggestions on here as to slipping as to P on the first stitch. I take no credit for the pattern I got it from Raverly. I just re typed it so I could understand and follow it better. Hope it helps u also. Jane
Jun 13, 2011 10:25:11   #
waya
 
SOOOO sorry I put on the origional pattern Here is the one I re-typed hope it helps

Attached file:
(Download)
Jun 13, 2011 10:33:28   #
Hagridsmom
 
I haven't knit this yet either but when going thru the pictures of projects at Ravelry I picked up 2 references for making it easier. Not sure if they are the same as beadness's suggestions. I am just copying and pasting ...

(first one)

"I found the pattern somewhat confusing the way it was written. I really need things spelled out. Michele at Loose Ends Yarn Shop was a huge help to me. For those who are easily confused like me, this is what I did (slipped stitches were slipped knitwise unless stated otherwise):
CORNER INSTRUCTIONS:

SL1, K8 YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K9

SL1, K7, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K8

SL1, K6, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K7

SL1, K5, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K6

SL1, K4, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K5

SL1, K3, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K4

SL1, K2, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K3

SL1, K1, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB K2

SL1, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K1

SL1, K1, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K2

SL1, K2, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K3

SL1, K3, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K4

SL1, K4, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K5

SL1, K5, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K6

SL1, K6, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K7

SL1, K7, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K8

SL1, K8, YFWD, SL1 PWISE, YB, TURN
SL1 PWISE, YB, K9

To achieve the ridges when attaching the rows on the straight edges, I did the rows this way:
ROW 1: SL1, K8, SL1 PWISE, P/U working yarn from between bumps on edge of blanket and knit that ST and previous slipped ST together.
ROW 2: SL1 PWISE, YB, K9"
 
Jun 13, 2011 10:40:17   #
Hagridsmom
 
second set of suggestions: (at least one of these was blogged about.)

"8/31/10 - Here is my version of Frankie’s pattern, as I’ve had rather a lot of requests for it! If anything doesn’t make sense, drop me a PM and I’ll do my best to explain. This is what worked for me. I’m not a pattern-writer by any stretch, so please bear with me!
A few notes:
When doing the CO, I found that the half-hitch method made it far easier later on when I had to knit into the CO edge. Long-tail made too tight of a CO edge for me. YMMV.

All slipped stitches through the whole pattern are slipped purlwise EXCEPT when you work the K2tog for the joins.
When you slip purlwise, keep your working yarn off to the right, slip the stitch, then make sure to return yarn to working position by bringing it around to the left and between the needles. If you just bring it to working position from the back, it will mess up the slipped-stitch ridge along the edge and you’ll get a funky, lumpy join later on. It took me about 4 tries to figure this out!

The original pattern says to work 2 rows of straight garter on all 10 stitches between the decreases of the corners and the increases of the corners. I didn’t like the way that looked, so I omitted it completely.

Ok, so here’s the modified pattern:
CO 10 st

K 18 rows of garter, slipping first stitch of every row PURLWISE. Make sure you mark the right side of the work. This will save you much heartache later on!

Work a mitered corner:
Row 1: Sl 1, K8, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 2: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K9.
Row 3: Sl 1, K7, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 4: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K8.
Row 5: Sl 1, K6, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 6: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K7.
Row 7: Sl 1, K5, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 8: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K6.
Row 9: Sl 1, K4, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 10: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K5.
Row 11: Sl 1, K3, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 12: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K4.
Row 13: Sl 1, K2, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 14: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K3.
Row 15: Sl 1, K1, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 16: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K2.
Row 17: K1, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 18: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K1.

Now reverse the process, working back up to 9sts, still wrapping the st at each turn:

Row 1: Sl 1, K1, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 2: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K2.
Row 3: Sl 1, K2, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 4: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K3.
Row 5: Sl 1, K3, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 6: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K4.
Row 7: Sl 1, K4, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 8: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K5.
Row 9: Sl 1, K5, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 10: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K6.
Row 11: Sl 1, K6, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 12: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K7.
Row 13: Sl 1, K7, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 14: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K8.
Row 15: Sl 1, K8, yfwd, sl 1 pwise, yb, turn.
Row 16: Sl 1 pwise, yb, K9.

That’s your first corner. As soon as you finish that, you immediately do the whole thing again. This is what brings the work around far enough so that you can start working down the side edge of the previous knitting.

Now you work back along the side of the original piece of knitting, joining as you go:
Row 1: Sl 1 pwise, K8, sl 1 kwise, pick up 1 st from the side of the knitting (I went underneath the slipped stitch on the edge, YO, pull that back through to the right side), K2tog. This should give you a nice flat stitch on top of the join, and the back side of it should look clean with no lumpy bits.
Row 2: sl 1 pwise, K 9.

Keep doing this until your working edge is even with the end of the previous work. Work a single mitered corner. Continue on with knitting and joining to the previous work, then working corners as necessary, to desired size."

It looks to me to be somewhat similar to the mitered corner blocks but I could easily be way off. I am currently doing the little frankie coin purse. When you are on ravelry and looking at her patterns click on the link for projects and you will see tons of pictures and their comments. This is where I got the two suggestions that I have sent here. Very helpful and interesting to see what other yarns have been used and how they changed it.
Jun 13, 2011 15:39:51   #
BISHOP
 
I pulled out an old set of double pointed needles I use for mittens and socks and used 2 of those. Worked great
Jun 13, 2011 16:23:08   #
mrscp1946
 
patact wrote:
I am new to this site and really have enjoyed so much about the community.
In looking over previous posts, I found a link I followed regarding the ten stitch blanket. I loved the way it looked, and figured that it would be a great way to use up some of my stash. Comments spoke about it being easy to do, once you got the hang of the pattern. Well, I cannot figure out the pattern well enough to get the raised edges. I checked on you tube, and the only video is in German, plus that knitter is so speedy, even after MANY viewings, I still don't get it. Does anyone have suggestions or can steer me to a site where I can learn the trick to this blanket?
Thank you.
I am new to this site and really have enjoyed so m... (show quote)


Are you slipping the first stitch. When you knit the 2nd row you will knit this stitch and it makes a bump. when you are finally joining you knit to the end of the row and slip the last stitch, pick up the bump and pass the slipped stitch over. I,ve being doing this blanket as mindless knitting when watching tv. when you master the bump you will be able to be mindless as well.
Jun 13, 2011 16:43:53   #
Ceili
 
Where do I find a picture and pattern for this Blanket? If someone already posted, my apologies, I'm at work and just darting in and out of the forum.
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