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Main
Yarn that Bleeds colour
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Jun 13, 2011 16:58:47   #
Friedrich
 
I found some yarn at the thrift store that is a very dark navy blue, which I love. In winding the first skein into a ball, I noticed that my hands had turned dark blue!!! What can I do to solve this problem as there are 12 skeins and it is a beautiful cotton for a summer tank that I want to make. Does anyone have a suggestion?

gisele
 
Jun 13, 2011 17:13:02   #
LCGIRL
 
Friedrich wrote:
I found some yarn at the thrift store that is a very dark navy blue, which I love. In winding the first skein into a ball, I noticed that my hands had turned dark blue!!! What can I do to solve this problem as there are 12 skeins and it is a beautiful cotton for a summer tank that I want to make. Does anyone have a suggestion?

gisele


You should wash the yarn with white vinegar and water which should stablize the color, then rinse, rinse to get the vinegar smell out,although it will disipate.

Hope it works for you gisele

Linda
Jun 13, 2011 17:13:25   #
LCGIRL
 
Friedrich wrote:
I found some yarn at the thrift store that is a very dark navy blue, which I love. In winding the first skein into a ball, I noticed that my hands had turned dark blue!!! What can I do to solve this problem as there are 12 skeins and it is a beautiful cotton for a summer tank that I want to make. Does anyone have a suggestion?

gisele


You should wash the yarn with white vinegar and water which should stablize the color, then rinse, rinse to get the vinegar smell out,although it will disipate.

Hope it works for you gisele - PS cold water

Linda
Jun 13, 2011 17:32:36   #
hildy3
 
I agree with Linda...white vinegar is a life saver!! I always add it to my color wash, no matter how many times they have been washed. I would put all yarn in lingerie bag, cold water cycle and add at least 2 cups white vinegar...not sure how to dry it, except just throw skeins in dryer and let them tumble....?? Short of that, I would take it back to store...but I think you like it, so an after-thought would be, wash and dry one only. Let us know your results. Hildy
Jun 13, 2011 22:24:56   #
onesoutherngal
 
a laundress once told me to put salt in the wash when i was washing anything that may bleed...(i was worried about some men's colored polo shirts with white colors) it seems to work...don't know if it would help with your yarn problem or not...any comments from others??? i am curious as to what you may think
Jun 14, 2011 05:18:13   #
dec2057
 
IF the yarn is a natural source - cotton, wool, etc. the vinegar and salt will set the color but if the yarn is acrylic you will need chemicals to set the color. Here is a link to info on dye setting, it is for quilters and fabric but the same principles apply. http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/quilt/msg0915263912996.html?11
 
Jun 14, 2011 06:20:22   #
Rrita
 
White vinegar is a good idea -- but be sure to rinse well - not for the smell, but because vinegar is an acid, & you don't want to damage your yarn.
Jun 14, 2011 08:26:40   #
bonster
 
I made dish rags with the Bernat Peace & Love 100% cotton and I soaked in vinegar/water overnight but it still bleeds. So I put them in mostly vinegar last night and will let them soar 24 hours. I also added some salt. I hope that works as I like using them. I just bought some Peaches and Creme but have not knit it up yet. Does anyone know if that yarn is stable or will I need to soak? Thanks for your advice & experience!
Jun 14, 2011 08:43:48   #
Rrita
 
I use Peaches 'n Cream exclusively for my kitchen washcloths. I use only white, so can't speak to the color-fastness of darker colors. The white cloths get washed in hot water with bleach, & hold up beautifully for a few years before needing to be replaced.
Jun 14, 2011 09:29:26   #
Friedrich
 
Thank you LCGirl and hildy3 and Rrita for your solutions (pardon the pun) re the vinegar and the salt. One question though - Is there a receipe for how much vinegar to how much water and what about the salt? Does it just go in with the water and vinegar and if so, how much salt? One teaspoon? or One Tablespoon? Chemistry was never one of my strenghs.
thanks again
gisele

g
Jun 14, 2011 10:05:58   #
Knitting Cruiser
 
Actually, white vinegar or salt will not set colors any more--this used to be true many years ago when dyes were formulated differently than they are now. If yarn (or fabric) bleeds color now, there isn't much you can use to stop it. Your only hope is to wash it several times and you will get less and less bleeding but it will be a long time before it ever stops bleeding.
 
Jun 14, 2011 11:14:08   #
Cherizac
 
It depends on the fiber the yarn is made from, and the dye that was used. If it was indigo, it will sometimes continue to crock for a long time, and only heavy rinsing over time will help.

Vinegar will often work, salt will sometimes. There's a new product out to put in the wash that helps absorb colors that bleed; I don't use it so I don't remember the name, but it might be worth looking into.

If it's wool, of course, you need to be careful about felting in washing and drying; no agitation or temperature changes.

Good luck!
Jun 14, 2011 11:20:53   #
eewtwe
 
I happen to agree that either vinegar or salt does not do the job. One of my son's friends purchased a ball olf yarn ($20.00)
from a vendor who breeds sheep. He wanted me to knit him a hat and when I noticed the yarn bled, I first tried salt and water and later vinegar. Neither eliminated the problem.

Eileen Wolf
Jun 14, 2011 11:47:34   #
Beetytwird (a regular here)
 
If you can't get the color to set with these suggestions, when you make your item, use a Color catcher cloth when you wash it. they are available in the laundry aisle at store, I love them! Those little gizmos have saved a lot of laundry for me! It seems that even items that have been washed a lot will bleed when you switch laundry soap! did not know that until it was too late.
Jun 14, 2011 12:11:36   #
sockyarn (a regular here)
 
The dryer part is a NO NO. Lay it flat to dry unless you want the skeins felted. It dose not take two cups to do the job. 1/2 a cup is sufficient.

hildy3 wrote:
I agree with Linda...white vinegar is a life saver!! I always add it to my color wash, no matter how many times they have been washed. I would put all yarn in lingerie bag, cold water cycle and add at least 2 cups white vinegar...not sure how to dry it, except just throw skeins in dryer and let them tumble....?? Short of that, I would take it back to store...but I think you like it, so an after-thought would be, wash and dry one only. Let us know your results. Hildy
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