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I am having severe neck and shoulder pain from knitting and crocheting
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Feb 16, 2013 09:51:25   #
Isabel L
 
Back to the PT. if you knit in bed do you have a bed that elevates your head to support your spine and head otherwise you are placing a lot of pressure on the spinal cord which can mimic many different types or areas of pain.
Envision holding a bowling ball on the end of a broomstick and any time you tip it off the direct line of perpendicular to the floor that's the pressure you will be placing on your cervical spine and musculature in your neck. Your spine is the size of broomstick at the top and your head weighs about 13lbs. Anyone that does that for long periods of time, like knitting, will definitely experience some type of pain and muscle spasm.
Also, in sitting try to stay as upright as possible therefore no recliners and such.
That's my soapbox for this morning.
 
Feb 16, 2013 10:23:20   #
Bombshellknits
 
Are you also cold and hunching your shoulders?
Feb 16, 2013 10:38:39   #
spinlouet
 
Isabel L wrote:
Back to the PT. if you knit in bed do you have a bed that elevates your head to support your spine and head otherwise you are placing a lot of pressure on the spinal cord which can mimic many different types or areas of pain.
Envision holding a bowling ball on the end of a broomstick and any time you tip it off the direct line of perpendicular to the floor that's the pressure you will be placing on your cervical spine and musculature in your neck. Your spine is the size of broomstick at the top and your head weighs about 13lbs. Anyone that does that for long periods of time, like knitting, will definitely experience some type of pain and muscle spasm.
Also, in sitting try to stay as upright as possible therefore no recliners and such.

Thanks this is good advice. I never really thought about the pressure I was putting on my spine but you are correct. I will sit in the chair instead of the bed.
That's my soapbox for this morning.
Back to the PT. if you knit in bed do you have a b... (show quote)
Feb 16, 2013 12:26:57   #
LavenderStone
 
Try putting pillows under your arms. This is a repetitive issue and can cause tendonitis and carpal tunnel. I was not able to knit for a few years because of it. Stretch, exercise and see a chiropractor if you can too.
Feb 16, 2013 12:29:15   #
spinlouet
 
LavenderStone wrote:
Try putting pillows under your arms. This is a repetitive issue and can cause tendonitis and carpal tunnel. I was not able to knit for a few years because of it. Stretch, exercise and see a chiropractor if you can too.


:thumbup:
Feb 16, 2013 13:05:52   #
happycrafter
 
My Dr at the hospital told me to lie flat,with my arm spread out at shoulder level, bend your arm just to elbo level and rotate arm in this position untill the palm of your hand is flat on the bed, then rotate back untill the back of your hand is on the bed, do this as many times as you can.
It is painfull when your doing it but believe me the relief when you put your arm down is wonderfull.
 
Feb 16, 2013 20:08:48   #
MarilynKnits (a regular here)
 
Are you using straight needles? If you make a project that gets a bit heavy on straight needles it puts a great deal of stress on your shoulders. Try switching to circular needles where the weight of the project will rest on your lap. Since I started using circular needles for all my straight knitting, I don't have the wrist and shoulder pain I used to from using long straight needles. It is an issue of physics and leverage.
Feb 16, 2013 20:28:37   #
tryalot
 
It has been advised here to take Ibuprofen every 2 - 8 hours, please do not take it more frequently than advised on the packet!
Feb 17, 2013 00:41:42   #
ladysjk
 
tryalot wrote:
It has been advised here to take Ibuprofen every 2 - 8 hours, please do not take it more frequently than advised on the packet!


You misread. I said 2 every 8 hours. By the way, 1000mg is the therapeutic dosage. Every 8 to 12 hours. Just thought I'd throw that out there. I only advise 2 every 8 hours, unless YOUR doctor states otherwise. I also would suggest Aleve, it actually works better, and only need them every 12 hours.
Feb 17, 2013 09:00:49   #
MarilynKnits (a regular here)
 
Be very careful with Aleve and Advil. Too much can cause internal bleeding and can be very dangerous.
Feb 18, 2013 18:17:48   #
Kathleenangel
 
Isabel L wrote:
I am a PT so my question would be.... Is the pain on one side only or are both shoulders painful? Does the pain go away when you are not knitting? I would look at your posture when you are knitting. You may be sitting with your head forward and cervical neck spine area flexed forward which can cause pain.
Knitting is a long repetitive movement so you may have to take frequent breaks. OR take some time off from knitting and allow yourself to recover if that is what's causing the pain and it goes away when you're not knitting.
Heat, ice and pain killers only treat symptoms and you need to deal with the cause.
I am a PT so my question would be.... Is the pain ... (show quote)


Was having the same problem and this is exactly what the doctor told me. I tend to hunch over and it is stretching the muscle which then goes down my left arm. Find that knitting aggravates it more than crocheting so do that more now than the knitting and doing the stretches also helps.
 
Feb 19, 2013 19:44:39   #
aclark3012
 
All of you have been so helpful-I didnt know so many people had this problem with knitting. It also comes with crocheting for the right shoulder and neck area. I have started taking breaks and applying ice to it and when it gets to hurting I stop a day and take aleve-thanks for all of the suggestions--
Feb 19, 2013 19:53:18   #
smoqui
 
Try varying your position when working, so that the stress is shifted to a different area. Try a different chair, and, if possible try knitting a different style. That is, if you regularly knit English, try continental or vice versa. I also find that knitting with either a knitting belt or sheath helps to lower the stress levels.
Feb 19, 2013 20:02:50   #
Michelle10n
 
I've been going through exactly the same thing. Knitting is my one pleasure in the evenings ( if I didn't need to work I'd be knitting by day too)
Over the last year the pain shooting down my left arm has been unbearable. Even my first 2 fingers on my left hand are numb & hurt
Heat / ice, painkillers, absolutely nothing has helped at all
I finally went to see an orthopedic surgeon to see if he could see the problem
They did an MRI, turns out I have 2 slipped discs in my neck & bone spurs growing
I have not fallen or had any type of accident. I don't know how this could of happened
Could you be dealing with the same problem?
Feb 19, 2013 20:50:22   #
aclark3012
 
As a matter of fact I had surgery for this in 2006-and -I didnt think more disks could be slipped. Yes-this could be something to look into.--thanks
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