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Machine Knitting
What is the "Bond" machine considered??
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Mar 16, 2013 19:33:34   #
Auntiesue
 
Do most of you that use the Bond USM tend to use bulky yarns only? From what I can see from the instructions, different key plates are used for different weights of yarn. Thanks in advance for your comments!!!
 
Mar 16, 2013 19:56:03   #
showperson
 
I use mostly worsted weight yarns 3 and 4. Bulky yarns (5) can be done on ever other needle, but it is a little tricky.
Mar 16, 2013 21:07:55   #
RhondaStech
 
I use everything from sport weight to bulky on mine. The only yarn that causes me fits is the Lion Brand Homespun
Mar 17, 2013 00:35:19   #
Auntiesue
 
showperson wrote:
I use mostly worsted weight yarns 3 and 4. Bulky yarns (5) can be done on ever other needle, but it is a little tricky.


Oh great!! I just purchased 5 skeins of 5 yarn for a sweater. Fell in love with it and couldn't resist. This will only be my second project with MK. My first was years ago so my skill are really rusty!!!
Mar 17, 2013 07:34:06   #
JoyceinNC
 
Bond machines are considered standard, mid gauge, single bed machines. There have been many, many discussions about this here on KP. Please click on "search" at the top, enter in Bond or whatever phrase you want to, and be prepared for a lot to go through!

Usually, I use key plate #1 for fingering weight yarn, #2 for sport yarn, #3 for worsted yarn, and #4 for heavy worsted yarn. There are also 2.5 and 3.5 available on the reverse side of the 2 and 3 plates, respectively. This is my own personal preference, of course. Any key plate can be used with a particular yarn, depending on what you want to end up with, as long as it feeds smoothly through the carriage and key plate. I've not been able to successfully feed yarn labeled as "chunky" or "bulky" through key plate 4, but I haven't tried knitting on every other needle, which I came across in a pattern.

Smooth yarns are also much easier to manage. Loopy or fuzzy yarns can get all tangled up and skip needles. When it comes to using a basic smooth 4-ply worsted, or a similar sport yarn, the Bond really sings! Every time I use mine, I enjoy it even more.
Mar 17, 2013 09:47:02   #
YarnStalker
 
I need to pull mine out and put it to work.
 
Mar 17, 2013 10:34:52   #
kestrelz
 
good answer
Mar 17, 2013 12:11:44   #
randiejg (a regular here)
 
The Bond is an 8mm machine, usually classified as Bulky. You should be able to knit yarns labeled with a 4 or 5 easily, depending on the yarn. The yarn classifications are just a rough guide, and it is up to each yarn manufacturer to label the yarn as they think the weight classifications apply.

For most machine manufacturers:
2.7 & 3 mm machines = fine gauge
4.5 & 5mm machines = standard gauge
6, 6.5, 7mm machines = mid gauge
8mm machines = bulky
9 & 10mm machines = chunky
Mar 17, 2013 13:11:28   #
Auntiesue
 
randiejg wrote:
The Bond is an 8mm machine, usually classified as Bulky. You should be able to knit yarns labeled with a 4 or 5 easily, depending on the yarn. The yarn classifications are just a rough guide, and it is up to each yarn manufacturer to label the yarn as they think the weight classifications apply.

For most machine manufacturers:
2.7 & 3 mm machines = fine gauge
4.5 & 5mm machines = standard gauge
6, 6.5, 7mm machines = mid gauge
8mm machines = bulky
9 & 10mm machines = chunky
The Bond is an 8mm machine, usually classified as ... (show quote)


Thanks for the info everyone!! This post also answered another question I had as well. (8mm) I need to order some additional transfer tools. I want to be able to do cable so a 3 prong transfer tool should really make it easier.

I'm excited to get started...hopefully later today!!!
Mar 17, 2013 14:49:42   #
randiejg (a regular here)
 
If you want to do cables with the 3-prong tools (six stitch wide cable, 3 crossing 3), it will be easier if you leave the stitch on each side of the cable out of work. It will be a lot easier to manipulate the stitches to cross them, and will also give more definition to the cables.
Mar 17, 2013 16:46:50   #
wareagle57
 
The Bond is considered a knitting frame, not a machine because it has no movable cams. A knitting machine has movable cams and levers that determine type of stitches and control the needles. The bond is controlled by the key plates as to the gauge and type of yarn used and the needles are controlled by plastic needle pushers or your fingers. Good luck, wareagle57
 
Mar 17, 2013 17:53:29   #
carolyn tolo
 
Thank you. I do write down what I learn here---and misplaced my notebook with the notes.
Mar 17, 2013 22:36:41   #
Auntiesue
 
randiejg wrote:
If you want to do cables with the 3-prong tools (six stitch wide cable, 3 crossing 3), it will be easier if you leave the stitch on each side of the cable out of work. It will be a lot easier to manipulate the stitches to cross them, and will also give more definition to the cables.


Thank you for the tip!!! I've copied and pasted this one to my notes.
Mar 18, 2013 00:57:58   #
Piper Too
 
I only use Double Knit yarn on my Bond. I don't know any other country equivalent. That knits perfectly for me. :)
Mar 18, 2013 02:44:53   #
Auntiesue
 
Well I started tonight with my waste yarn and the darn unit keeps jamming up. I'm pretty sure it's the table I'm using. Will pick up some "shelving" at work tomorrow. If it continues, I'll have to look a bit deeper into the problem. Worked beautifully years ago. I think I'm going to add a "sponge bar" strip as well. I see that the needles could be held a bit more stable.
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Machine Knitting
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