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Machine Knitting
Calculate Circle
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Apr 16, 2013 17:41:13   #
gracefulknits
 
I would like to create a circle with short rows and am trying to come up with the math. I have a gauge. I have diameter, radius and circumference (thanks to pi). Shouldn't I be able to multiply the row count (since a circle goes around in 'rows') by the radius and come out with the desired circumference? Thus far this has not happened-always larger. When I looked in Regine Faust's knit course she gave directions for gore measurement but that is a little different. She also set up a task with a gauge and row count to create a tam but I could not decipher her math-maybe she subtracted neg. ease but it is not stated. I am finding generators but I would like to know the process. I am thinking about trying the difference between 1/4 of the circumference and the radius multiplied by the row count next.
 
Apr 17, 2013 09:52:13   #
TerryKnits
 
gracefulknits wrote:
I would like to create a circle with short rows and am trying to come up with the math. I have a gauge. I have diameter, radius and circumference (thanks to pi). Shouldn't I be able to multiply the row count (since a circle goes around in 'rows') by the radius and come out with the desired circumference? Thus far this has not happened-always larger. When I looked in Regine Faust's knit course she gave directions for gore measurement but that is a little different. She also set up a task with a gauge and row count to create a tam but I could not decipher her math-maybe she subtracted neg. ease but it is not stated. I am finding generators but I would like to know the process. I am thinking about trying the difference between 1/4 of the circumference and the radius multiplied by the row count next.
I would like to create a circle with short rows an... (show quote)


Hmm, I know that pi times diameter equals circumference, and that radius is half of diameter. I'm not sure what math equation to use for determining a knitting pattern, though. This is the way I would try it, though:

For a test, I would cast-on 20 stitches with scrap and ravel cord; then knit one row with working yarn. I would short row down, one stitch less each row, so that I would end up with a pie-shaped wedge. Then, take off with scrap yarn and let it rest.

I would then measure the wide edge. I'm using arbitrary numbers here, but let's say it measures 2 inches. I want the circumference of my circle to be 40 inches. 40 divided by 2 equals 20. My reasoning is that I would have to short row 20 wedges to complete the circle I want.

That's the way my brain works it out. I don't know if it is correct, but I would try it that way with a test piece and see if it works.
Apr 17, 2013 11:43:51   #
gracefulknits
 
Teresa, you have given me something to chew on. Thanks.
Apr 17, 2013 12:07:41   #
gracefulknits
 
I am going to use the Diophantine Equation and see how that works. I am going on the assumption that I would cast on stitches equal to the radius and then equate the row count to the size of section (wedge) I desire as well as the number of sections I require. It makes perfect sense when I talk it! Yup-I should be able to use the above formula. Thanks again for the brain jolt-you made me think "wedge"! I will let you know.
Apr 17, 2013 13:52:10   #
gracefulknits
 
GROAN.........no go with the formula we call Magic.
Apr 17, 2013 14:31:50   #
maggieandrews
 
Hello

I don't really understand what you are trying to calculate, but:-
the following shapings using Holding Position [Partial Knitting] will automatically form a circle in stocking stitch.

1 st every alternate row 5 panels.
1 st every row or 2 sts every alternate row 10 panels
4 sts every alternate row 20 panels.
8 sts every alternate row 40 panels.

The measurement of the number of stitches knitting, will,be the diameter.
The number of rows on the longest edge will be the circumference.

I hope this helps.

This and many other things are explained clearly in my booklet called 100 Ways With Holding Position.
 
Apr 17, 2013 15:12:11   #
gracefulknits
 
Happy Birthday to Me! This does help.
I want to be in control of the numbers :) and want to be able grade up or down with any yarn just using numbers. For instance, let's say I want to create a circle shape to fit in a specific part of a bodice for a fitted top and I need that circle to be exactly 6" in diameter. I want to be able to just work the numbers and have that happen. I can make circles I just want them to be the size I dictate around the circumference. Your outline should help ALOT!
Apr 17, 2013 16:53:42   #
ValT
 
Hello

When I need to do this type of calculation, I have found this hat calculator useful
http://www.thedietdiary.com/knittingfiend/tools/knittingHat.html

Hope it helps

Best wishes
Val
Apr 17, 2013 17:19:59   #
ann-other-knitter
 
gracefulknits wrote:
GROAN.........no go with the formula we call Magic.


I always do circles with short rows 1at a time or two at a time and I always get a circle. Don't task your brain. Below see the Mexican rainbow shawl in pastel colours. You should have 6 segments in a circle. It only needs six segments for half a circle
Circle segments

Apr 17, 2013 17:58:40   #
GinB
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medallion_knitting

http://www.laylock.org/blog/tag/cheat-sheet/
Apr 18, 2013 01:49:59   #
Maryknits513
 
Teena Crawshaw taught a class on circle knitting at Spring Fling this past weekend. I sat in the class, and sort of blanked out at all the math. Of course, it was the first class after lunch. ;). I have a great handout, if I can figure out how to do it on my own!

Teena wrote some patterns on circle knitting. You could probably get them thru The Knit Knack Shop in Peru In.
 
Apr 18, 2013 01:56:24   #
jaysclark
 
ann-other-knitter wrote:
I always do circles with short rows 1at a time or two at a time and I always get a circle. Don't task your brain. Below see the Mexican rainbow shawl in pastel colours. You should have 6 segments in a circle. It only needs six segments for half a circle


That is fantastic - how did you do it?
Apr 18, 2013 12:51:34   #
gracefulknits
 
That is just LOVELY! Yup-I know how to do circles. My problem is that I will need to be able to make the circle the exact size I need for the garment I am constructing. I get the impression I will have to just make a batch of circles and note the numbers.
Apr 18, 2013 12:52:45   #
gracefulknits
 
Your such a tease! :)
I hear ya though-lunch coma
Apr 18, 2013 12:59:01   #
gracefulknits
 
Hi Val! I have seen that calculator and that is exactly the point I bring up. How were those numbers generated? I have Excell which means if I knew the formula I could have a better understanding of how to get exactly what I want. The funny thing is I am not a "mathy" person! And yet I am obsessed with this.
In truth I am amazed at how many versions there are of making circles. It has been a lot of fun!
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Machine Knitting
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