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Machine Knitting
Lace Knitting with DAK-8
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Jun 13, 2013 18:11:55   #
IrynaZ
 
As a new knitter who just bought an electronic SK-840 with DAK-8, I would like to know if its possible to knit a lace without buying a lace tool license. I'm not going to design lace pattern, I would just like to use whatever patterns I have in my machine. I have an LC580 Lace Carriage.

Thanks
 
Jun 14, 2013 03:56:11   #
mannie
 
Yes it definitely is possible, I have the same set up and I have just knitted a lace top. I have DAK8 but not the extra lace tool.

However I am struggling to overcome a particular problem, concerning end stitches.

With the punchcard system which I have used previously, you could put little plastic pieces over the end needles, to stop transfers happening at the edge. With the EC1 and Mylar sheets, you could place the point cams just inside the knitting width, and the end stitches would knit plain. But if you do that with DAK8 the needles beyond the cam points all try to transfer. I have a partial solution, but you have to pay close attention to the design on the screen. If I can see that there is a transfer about to happen right at the edge, I push an extra, nonworking needle forward to B position to "catch" the transfer, and then put it back again afterwards. Tedious, but better than a dropped stitch.

I would be very interested to know if the lace tool licence has a way of overcoming this problem.

One note of warning - if you don't take the carriage completely past the point cams, on the return row all the needles will try to transfer!
Jun 14, 2013 14:20:57   #
IrynaZ
 
mannie wrote:
Yes it definitely is possible, I have the same set up and I have just knitted a lace top. I have DAK8 but not the extra lace tool.

However I am struggling to overcome a particular problem, concerning end stitches.

With the punchcard system which I have used previously, you could put little plastic pieces over the end needles, to stop transfers happening at the edge. With the EC1 and Mylar sheets, you could place the point cams just inside the knitting width, and the end stitches would knit plain. But if you do that with DAK8 the needles beyond the cam points all try to transfer. I have a partial solution, but you have to pay close attention to the design on the screen. If I can see that there is a transfer about to happen right at the edge, I push an extra, nonworking needle forward to B position to "catch" the transfer, and then put it back again afterwards. Tedious, but better than a dropped stitch.

I would be very interested to know if the lace tool licence has a way of overcoming this problem.

One note of warning - if you don't take the carriage completely past the point cams, on the return row all the needles will try to transfer!
Yes it definitely is possible, I have the same set... (show quote)


Thank you Mannie,
I will definitely follow your advice when I get my lace carriage in about a week (just bought it on Ebay). So far, I found only 20 lace patterns in DAK-8. Are there more hidden somewhere? They seem to be omitted from Stitchworld. The book has them but the program doesn't.
I have a lot of lace patterns from magazines but I just don't know how I'm supposed to input them into the program without the lace tool.

Iryna
Jun 14, 2013 14:49:25   #
mannie
 
Hi you can just copy the patterns from magazines into the stitch designer part of DAK8. Don't worry about lace symbols, just copy in the pattern as if it was a punchcard, using any single colour for the holes, and a single colour for the background. Use method of knitting, Fairisle, and the background colour set to transparent, and the "punched holes" set to opaque. Knit the first row with the lace carriage very slowly and carefully just in case that is the wrong way round, and adjacent needles all try to transfer stitches!

Also there are a few lace patterns in the section Silver Reed. I don't know what what would happen if you try to knit lace patterns meant for Brother machines, but some of the simpler ones might work, even if they don't come out exactly like the pictures in Stitchworld

While you are waiting for your lace carriage to arrive, why not just play around with stitch designer and make some simple Fairisle patterns for practice and confidence
Good luck
Jun 14, 2013 16:25:36   #
IrynaZ
 
mannie wrote:
Hi you can just copy the patterns from magazines into the stitch designer part of DAK8. Don't worry about lace symbols, just copy in the pattern as if it was a punchcard, using any single colour for the holes, and a single colour for the background. Use method of knitting, Fairisle, and the background colour set to transparent, and the "punched holes" set to opaque. Knit the first row with the lace carriage very slowly and carefully just in case that is the wrong way round, and adjacent needles all try to transfer stitches!

Also there are a few lace patterns in the section Silver Reed. I don't know what what would happen if you try to knit lace patterns meant for Brother machines, but some of the simpler ones might work, even if they don't come out exactly like the pictures in Stitchworld

While you are waiting for your lace carriage to arrive, why not just play around with stitch designer and make some simple Fairisle patterns for practice and confidence
Good luck
Hi you can just copy the patterns from magazines i... (show quote)


Thank you so much, I would never have guessed!
If we can just copy a punchcard, what is the point of the smart symbols in the program like lace? I copied some hand knitting lace patterns using those symbols but I can't check it without the carriage.
Jun 15, 2013 03:58:37   #
mannie
 
It's not obvious, but the symbols on screen are there mostly so that the knitter/designer can see what they are doing. I've spent so much time using a punchcard machine that I find it easiest to think like that, with holes and blanks. The electronics, clever though they are, still work on that same basic logic, each needle can only do either "one thing" or "the other thing", and it is the cam lever which tells them which particular thing to do.

As soon as I think about DesignaKnit terms like"right side facing", or "selected needles", etc, I get confused easily, and I go back to thinking in punchcard terms, using Fairisle setting, and then I am OK. There are still lots of things I don't know how to do, but I am enjoying finding out. The lace top I made won a prize at our Knitting Machine club competition, so I was very pleased that I made the effort. I just used a very simple lace pattern that I copied in to stitch designer from the Harmony book of machine knitting stitches, proof that the system works!

Mannie
 
Jun 16, 2013 11:16:26   #
IrynaZ
 
mannie wrote:
It's not obvious, but the symbols on screen are there mostly so that the knitter/designer can see what they are doing. I've spent so much time using a punchcard machine that I find it easiest to think like that, with holes and blanks. The electronics, clever though they are, still work on that same basic logic, each needle can only do either "one thing" or "the other thing", and it is the cam lever which tells them which particular thing to do.

As soon as I think about DesignaKnit terms like"right side facing", or "selected needles", etc, I get confused easily, and I go back to thinking in punchcard terms, using Fairisle setting, and then I am OK. There are still lots of things I don't know how to do, but I am enjoying finding out. The lace top I made won a prize at our Knitting Machine club competition, so I was very pleased that I made the effort. I just used a very simple lace pattern that I copied in to stitch designer from the Harmony book of machine knitting stitches, proof that the system works!

Mannie
It's not obvious, but the symbols on screen are th... (show quote)


Thanks again, Mannie. Congratulations on winning a prize! I wish I could see the lace top you made.
Would you recommend for me to read all the DAK8 manuals , page by page? I tried but some of them are very long(400 pages) and difficult to understand.
Jun 17, 2013 03:18:34   #
mannie
 
I don't usually read entire manuals, just try and pick out the bits that are relevant to what I am trying to do. If ever I sit down to just read something, within minutes I find myself back at the machine, trying it out. I never seem to understand something until I translate it into action. Then when I think I have grasped something, I make a few notes in my own words to remind myself what to do.
I often have to backtrack, and go over something I have done previously, but after a few times, things begin to stick, then I move on and build on what I have learnt. With this machine, and DesignaKnit, there is just so much potential, but I try and make myself focus on learning just what I need to do for a particular project, then start with a practice piece. But we all learn differently, so just do whatever seems to work for you. If you get stuck on any particular thing, just ask, there are so many knowledgeable and helpful people on this forum - I'm happy to help when I can, but there is so much I don't know yet.
Jun 18, 2013 13:14:48   #
IrynaZ
 
mannie wrote:
I don't usually read entire manuals, just try and pick out the bits that are relevant to what I am trying to do. If ever I sit down to just read something, within minutes I find myself back at the machine, trying it out. I never seem to understand something until I translate it into action. Then when I think I have grasped something, I make a few notes in my own words to remind myself what to do.
I often have to backtrack, and go over something I have done previously, but after a few times, things begin to stick, then I move on and build on what I have learnt. With this machine, and DesignaKnit, there is just so much potential, but I try and make myself focus on learning just what I need to do for a particular project, then start with a practice piece. But we all learn differently, so just do whatever seems to work for you. If you get stuck on any particular thing, just ask, there are so many knowledgeable and helpful people on this forum - I'm happy to help when I can, but there is so much I don't know yet.
I don't usually read entire manuals, just try and ... (show quote)


Thank you for your time and valuable advice, Mannie.
All of your insight will be put to good use. I'll be sure to post the results of my experience with the Lace Carriage.
 
          
Machine Knitting
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