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Gassed cotton..what?
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Jun 19, 2013 22:39:47   #
tvarnas
 
Cotton fiber often is listed as 'gassed cotton'. Can someone explain the what and why about this. Thank you in advance to all you knowledgeable KPer' s.
 
Jun 19, 2013 22:42:13   #
no1girl (a regular here)
 
Gassed thread is mercerized cotton thread that has been exposed very rapidly to a hot gas flame. This process removes the fuzz and excess lint on the thread, ...
Jun 19, 2013 22:48:15   #
jlschulke
 
I actually have no idea, but I think it may be that the farmers spray the cotton fields to make the leaves fall off and die so they can pick the cotton easier with the cotton picking machine.
Jun 19, 2013 22:53:26   #
Hurricane
 
From e-how

What Are the Different Types of Cotton? Types of Cotton Threads

Mercerized Cotton Thread
Mercerization is the process of subjecting cotton thread to a chemical process in which the thread is dipped in a sodium hydroxide bath, followed by an acid bath. The chemical treatment causes the thread to plump up before it relaxes and straightens once again. Mercerized thread more readily accepts dye and holds the color longer. It is also stronger than nonmercerized thread, has a shiny appearance and resists mildew. Most modern commercial cotton threads are mercerized.

Glazed Cotton Thread
Glazed thread is mercerized cotton thread that has been waxed or treated with various chemicals that give it a polished, lustrous appearance, which is desirable for certain hand-sewing and hand-quilting projects. Although the process of glazing strengthens the thread, the glaze often can rub off and clog up sewing machines and sewing machine needles. For this reason, most stitchers will avoid glazed cotton thread for machine sewing.

Gassed Cotton Thread
Gassed thread is mercerized cotton thread that has been exposed very rapidly to a hot gas flame. This process removes the fuzz and excess lint on the thread, giving it a brighter, smoother, slightly iridescent appearance. Gassed cotton threads are more expensive than regular mercerized cotton, although gassed thread manufactured in America will be considerably less expensive than Egyptian cotton. Gassed thread is often used in fabrics such as poplin, voile and gabardine, but its high quality makes it useful for most types of sewing or quilting.

Cotton-Wrapped Polyester Thread
Cotton-wrapped polyester thread is an all-purpose thread often referred to as "dual duty." It is practical for nearly any sewing project, both by hand and machine, and is especially useful for blended fabrics. It is stronger than than 100 percent cotton thread. It is also more elastic, which can sometimes be undesirable, but can be useful for sewing fabrics that stretch. Lower grades of cotton-wrapped polyester thread can become fuzzy, which can lead to breakage of the thread and a build up of lint in sewing machines.

Advantages
High-quality mercerized cotton threads are soft and durable enough to adjust to normal wear and tear, but pliable enough to withstand typical fabric shrinkage. It is an easy-care fiber that can be hand or machine washed and air or machine dried, although hand washing and air drying will preserve the life of the thread. Cotton thread is available in a variety of weights that make it desirable for a number of different sewing projects.
Jun 19, 2013 23:07:43   #
JuneS
 
Thank you for the E-How post!
Jun 19, 2013 23:20:00   #
fibrefay
 
Wow! Didn't know that. Goes to show we live with all sorts of chemicals even in simple cotton thread.
 
Jun 19, 2013 23:28:14   #
CTSDSS5 (a regular here)
 
That was very enlightening! Thank you for sharing it, Hurricane.
Jun 19, 2013 23:40:55   #
Hurricane
 
CTSDSS5 wrote:
That was very enlightening! Thank you for sharing it, Hurricane.


Always a pleasure to help. I was able to look it up in about a minute.
Jun 19, 2013 23:44:46   #
owenseamus
 
This made me laugh. I was with my daughter in Hong Kong and when I asked for water (nice restaurant no fear), he asked me "gassed" or not. I looked questioning at my daughter and she said with bubbles or not.......not maybe there is bubbles in our yarns!
Jun 19, 2013 23:51:37   #
Jessica-Jean (a regular here)
 
Thanks, Hurricane, for that information. In searching for that page, I found more info about cotton:

http://www.ehow.com/about_4682081_what-different-types-cotton.html

http://www.ehow.com/about_5379736_types-cotton-threads.html
Jun 19, 2013 23:53:39   #
sallysilly
 
fibrefay wrote:
Wow! Didn't know that. Goes to show we live with all sorts of chemicals even in simple cotton thread.


Love those chemicals....But gassed cotton is wonderful to work with. Wonderful stitch defination, feels good to the hands when you work with it. Really, high quality has a wonderful sheen...nicer than med. quality silk...
 
Jun 19, 2013 23:54:22   #
sallysilly
 
fibrefay wrote:
Wow! Didn't know that. Goes to show we live with all sorts of chemicals even in simple cotton thread.


Love those chemicals....But gassed cotton is wonderful to work with. Wonderful stitch defination, feels good to the hands when you work with it. Really, high quality has a wonderful sheen...nicer than med. quality silk...
Jun 20, 2013 01:57:04   #
HandyFamily
 
TIPS 'n THREADS

Mercerized Cotton

Mercerization is a chemical process that cotton thread is subjected to. The thread is dipped in a sodium hydroxide bath, followed by an acid bath. The chemical treatment causes the thread to plump up before it relaxes and straightens once again. Mercerized thread accepts dye better and holds the color longer. It is also stronger than nonmercerized thread, has a shiny appearance and resists mildew. The process was named after John Mercer, in 1844. He treated cotton fibers with sodium hydroxide.

Glazed Cotton Thread

Glazed thread is mercerized cotton thread that has been waxed or treated with various chemicals that give it a polished, lustrous appearance, which is desirable for certain hand-sewing and hand-quilting projects. The process of glazing strengthens the thread.
Jun 20, 2013 07:06:51   #
Picklelady
 
Thanks so much for the information. I just love this site. I learn something every day.
Jun 20, 2013 08:24:54   #
gramknits (a regular here)
 
CTSDSS5 wrote:
That was very enlightening! Thank you for sharing it, Hurricane.


Totally agree, thanks Hurricane!
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