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Main
Sharp and Piercing crochet hooks
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Jun 23, 2013 16:45:19   #
wyldwmn
 
Has anyone tried any of these hooks? The Sharp hook is advertised as useful for size 10 and larger thread, but I have not been able to find out the actual size of the hook itself, or the size to which it is similar. For the two Piercing hooks, the advertisements say that there is one large and one small, but I have not been able to find out the actual sizes of the hooks. Also, while the Piercing crochet hooks are advertised as not needing to have pre-made holes and as being able to pierce two layers of flannel, the website shows what appear to be double layers of flannel that are first edged with serging and then the holes used for the hook. So it isn't clear whether they really do need to have pre-made holes or not. The information I've found so far indicates that the hooks will go between the threads of the fabric without breaking threads. Has anyone had any experience with this? I'm trying to get some clarification before deciding whether to purchase the Sharp hook or the set of two Piercing hooks. I also prefer the shape of Boye hooks, and haven't been able to find any information about the shape of any of these hooks.
 
Jun 23, 2013 16:58:52   #
jinx (a regular here)
 
I do not know about those hooks. I do know I use my regular hooks and poke a hole through the towel when I add a topper to it. Need a little effort to push it through, works great.
Size F, G, or H Susan Bates.
Jun 23, 2013 17:01:08   #
wyldwmn
 
I thought about using a much smaller hook to pierce through a flour sack towel for which I've made some wide yellow lace for one end, but I rather don't want to risk the smaller hook creating a snag or run in the threads if the Sharp or Piercing hooks will be better. Plus, I want to avoid having to use a smaller hook or needle to pierce a hole or avoid having to use a large sewing machine needle to pre-pierce holes. This is a gift, so I'm taking extra care.
Jun 24, 2013 12:10:49   #
Linda333
 
I purchased a piercing crochet hook and I am definitely not impressed. It is a steel hook that has been ground down to a point at the end. The groove of the hook is very thin and looks as though it would break easily. The maker of this hook also ground off the information that would tell me the size and maker of the hook, so I have no idea.

I did purchase a tapered awl at Joann Fabrics that I use to punch the holes in fleece prior to adding a crocheted border. I am very pleased with the results. The piercing crochet hook will not go through fleece.

Hope this helps.
Jun 24, 2013 12:53:17   #
wyldwmn
 
I am very glad to have this information. I have been wondering if these are actually originally made hooks, or if they are purchased hooks that are just ground to a point on one end. They aren't available in stores right now, so it's not like I can actually see them and hold them to get an idea of how they are (if at all) balanced. I've also wondered if a person couldn't just file the tip of an existing hook so as to not have to purchase one of these. I'm thinking that using a sewing machine with a large needle to put a row of long basting stitches is a fast and better alternative until more is known about the hooks. So far the advertising talks about towels and thicknesses of flannel...I am working on thinner fabric in which I don't want to have pulled threads, and I'm working with size 20 and 30 thread for the most part.
Jun 24, 2013 13:17:09   #
Blond Bomber
 
My husband took an extra G hook and filed a sharp point on it with his grinder...works great for piercing for crocheting towels.
 
Jun 24, 2013 13:24:02   #
wyldwmn
 
Does anyone know if the larger hooks, such as a size G, are solid at the point or hollow, or perhaps hollow as they get larger? Just wondering because I'm thinking of experimenting with some smaller hooks, size 7, 8, and 9, by asking a family member to grind them for me. I already know that I like the balance of the Boye hooks, so if it's just a matter of having a finer point, I'd rather pick them up at a garage sale or junk store, and experiment for way less money than what the websites are charging, especially since the shipping is almost the same price as the product itself. On the other hand, it might be time for me to buy myself that little Dreml drill I've been wanting, and make sure I've got the little grinding disk.
Jun 24, 2013 13:27:59   #
wyldwmn
 
Lookie here for a close up of the Sharp crochet hook:

http://www.repeatcrafterme.com/2012/07/crochet-watermelon-coin-purse.html
Jun 24, 2013 13:31:52   #
wyldwmn
 
Here is some information about grinding a crochet hook to use for mechanical purposes. The site talks about using a Dreml tool for the grinding:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orchestrelles/message/262
Jun 24, 2013 13:57:41   #
Linda6885 (a regular here)
 
wyldwmn wrote:
Has anyone tried any of these hooks? The Sharp hook is advertised as useful for size 10 and larger thread, but I have not been able to find out the actual size of the hook itself, or the size to which it is similar. For the two Piercing hooks, the advertisements say that there is one large and one small, but I have not been able to find out the actual sizes of the hooks. Also, while the Piercing crochet hooks are advertised as not needing to have pre-made holes and as being able to pierce two layers of flannel, the website shows what appear to be double layers of flannel that are first edged with serging and then the holes used for the hook. So it isn't clear whether they really do need to have pre-made holes or not. The information I've found so far indicates that the hooks will go between the threads of the fabric without breaking threads. Has anyone had any experience with this? I'm trying to get some clarification before deciding whether to purchase the Sharp hook or the set of two Piercing hooks. I also prefer the shape of Boye hooks, and haven't been able to find any information about the shape of any of these hooks.
Has anyone tried any of these hooks? The Sharp ho... (show quote)


Here is what they look like.
http://piercingcrochethooks.com/
Jun 24, 2013 14:24:08   #
wyldwmn
 
The problem with the picture from the website is that it's not a closeup of the tip. And I am not able to really see the shape of the hook itself. I don't know if these new hooks are sized according to existing hooks, or if they are sized somewhere in between. For that much money, I want to know a lot more about what I'm buying, especially if making one myself from an existing hook is going to give me a better overall product. I think I would only use these hooks for the first round on any type of fabric and not for the rest of the design, as I would not want to have to be careful about splitting thread. I have some bamboo thread, for example, but a stitcher friend of mine says that when she was working with it, it tended to split when using a regular size 7 hook.
 
Jun 24, 2013 14:35:58   #
Mrs.Mac
 
FYI about piercing fleece, Nancy's Notions has a rotary cutter that makes neat holes in fleece for whatever needs to be done with it. You can go online to her site, and get a catalog.
Linda333 wrote:
I purchased a piercing crochet hook and I am definitely not impressed. It is a steel hook that has been ground down to a point at the end. The groove of the hook is very thin and looks as though it would break easily. The maker of this hook also ground off the information that would tell me the size and maker of the hook, so I have no idea.

I did purchase a tapered awl at Joann Fabrics that I use to punch the holes in fleece prior to adding a crocheted border. I am very pleased with the results. The piercing crochet hook will not go through fleece.

Hope this helps.
I purchased a piercing crochet hook and I am defin... (show quote)
Jun 24, 2013 14:44:22   #
wyldwmn
 
The Nancy's rotary cutter is a good idea. I just remembered as I read your wise words, that I have a professional tracing wheel that has very long spikes. It's used for pattern making and especially for taking a pattern from a completed garment. It makes large holes. I think I will pull it out and try it. The spikes are spaces at just about the width I would want to use for the foundation row. I'll try to find a picture somewhere on the 'net and provide the link, or if I can't, I'll take a pic to upload. I'm not remembering the exact name of it in this moment, so I must be needing some dark chocolate to kickstart my brain...
Jun 24, 2013 15:04:07   #
Mrs.Mac
 
I h ave one of those spike wheels, but they really do not make a nice looking round hole. I guess it depends on the size of the yarn that is to go into the hole. Would be useful for smaller guage yarn, however. Thanks for the reminder.

wyldwmn wrote:
The Nancy's rotary cutter is a good idea. I just remembered as I read your wise words, that I have a professional tracing wheel that has very long spikes. It's used for pattern making and especially for taking a pattern from a completed garment. It makes large holes. I think I will pull it out and try it. The spikes are spaces at just about the width I would want to use for the foundation row. I'll try to find a picture somewhere on the 'net and provide the link, or if I can't, I'll take a pic to upload. I'm not remembering the exact name of it in this moment, so I must be needing some dark chocolate to kickstart my brain...
The Nancy's rotary cutter is a good idea. I just ... (show quote)
Jun 24, 2013 15:04:10   #
ForgetfulFi
 
I noticed that there were no actual pictures of a sharp hook on any of their site pictures. They just show what edges can be put on things. It sounds like a big con to me and something to be avoided like the plague
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