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Magic Loop two mittens at the same time
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Aug 26, 2013 14:10:18   #
Susan from NJ
 
Hello Everyone:

Needing your help please. I have watched several different videos on doing two mittens at the same time using the Magic Loop. Here's my question:

Are there two different methods of doing this? One utilizes ONE circular needle holding both mittens at the same time and the other method seems to be using TWO circulars with one half of a mitten on each needle. I'm not sure I'm explaining this correctly.

In any event, I seem to end up using only ONE circular needle yet I am working both mittens simultaneously. Will I run into trouble past the ribbed cuff? if I continue on?

I would appreciate any insight you have as I don't want to get too far into making these only to find out that I have to go amphibian for a while :lol: Looking forward to your excellent advice.
 
Aug 26, 2013 14:15:50   #
NRoberts (a regular here)
 
You can do both mittens on one circular needle if the cable is long enough. Should be over 40 inch cable to manage this.

Of course each mitten is knit from a different ball, or from one ball using the outside yarn for one mitten and yarn pulled from the inside for the other.

I saw a youtube video on how to cast on both mittens on the one needle, one after the other. It was intriguing. Half the stitches of one mitten are cast on, and the tail of the yarn is left very long to cast on the remainder later. Then the next mitten is cast on, and the loop is pulled halfway through the stitches so that half that mitten is on one side of the cable and half on the other, as in normal Magic Loop method. At the start of the first round, the long tail of the first half cast on mitten is used to cast on the remaining stitches so that they can be moved to the other needle. When done with this cast on, half of each mitten's stitches are on each side of the cable.

I prefer to do them one at a time.

Susan from NJ wrote:
Hello Everyone:

Needing your help please. I have watched several different videos on doing two mittens at the same time using the Magic Loop. Here's my question:

Are there two different methods of doing this? One utilizes ONE circular needle holding both mittens at the same time and the other method seems to be using TWO circulars with one half of a mitten on each needle. I'm not sure I'm explaining this correctly.

In any event, I seem to end up using only ONE circular needle yet I am working both mittens simultaneously. Will I run into trouble past the ribbed cuff? if I continue on?

I would appreciate any insight you have as I don't want to get too far into making these only to find out that I have to go amphibian for a while :lol: Looking forward to your excellent advice.
Hello Everyone: br br Needing your help please. ... (show quote)
Aug 26, 2013 14:32:41   #
Susan from NJ
 
I saw a youtube video on how to cast on both mittens on the one needle, one after the other. It was intriguing. Half the stitches of one mitten are cast on, and the tail of the yarn is left very long to cast on the remainder later. Then the next mitten is cast on, and the loop is pulled halfway through the stitches so that half that mitten is on one side of the cable and half on the other, as in normal Magic Loop method. At the start of the first round, the long tail of the first half cast on mitten is used to cast on the remaining stitches so that they can be moved to the other needle. When done with this cast on, half of each mitten's stitches are on each side of the cable.

Thank you. That's the video I just watched and is the one that got me totally confused.

I am comfortable working with the two mittens on one long circular but frankly, I'm not sure I won't go back to my usual method of doing 2 or even 4 mittens at a time using the circulars as straights. Of course then I have to do the seaming, but I don't know about all this pushing and pulling needles.

I'm committed to this pair so I'll see how it goes as I get further into it. I really wanted to make sure I was doing it right in that I ended up with using only one needle and I wanted to be reassured that I wouldn't run into any trouble when I got to the thumb.

Thanks for the quick information. Really appreciate it.
Aug 26, 2013 15:03:11   #
mopgenorth
 
This is how I knit two at a time (cuff up) with magic loop (one 40" needle)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCwfbiZd7dI
Aug 26, 2013 15:30:51   #
Susan from NJ
 
mopgenorth wrote:
This is how I knit two at a time (cuff up) with magic loop (one 40" needle)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCwfbiZd7dI


Thanks for that link. I just found her site and like how she shows/explains things.
Aug 27, 2013 11:18:02   #
JanHarvey
 
I always prefer to do the first 3or4 rounds on sleeves/socks/mits separately before putting them on the same needle - I find it easier in the long run as those first few rounds hold their shape better then
 
Aug 27, 2013 11:26:57   #
Susan from NJ
 
JanHarvey wrote:
I always prefer to do the first 3or4 rounds on sleeves/socks/mits separately before putting them on the same needle - I find it easier in the long run as those first few rounds hold their shape better then


I did that but thanks for the reminder.

As it turns out I have mastered the technique thanks to some guidance from you guys. But...and here's the but....I don't like it. I find there is too much wasted time tinkering with the yarn/needles and I can't get into any sort of a rhythm because I'm starting and stopping so often. I also find I'm knitting much tighter than usual. I don't know if that has happened to others, but I am typically a very consistent and even tensioned knitter but not so with this method.

I am committed to finishing this pair but I think I'd rather be faced with sewing a seam at the end of the run than this.

I can see perhaps this system might be okay for larger items but since I'm making children sized mittens, for me it doesn't make sense.

Thank you everyone for your great direction, hints, tips and encouragement.
Aug 27, 2013 11:42:40   #
mirl56 (a regular here)
 
I prefer making socks/mitten/etc with a different method - 2 at a time on 2 circs. this is not the same as Magic Loop. I like it better as there is not so all the moving stitches around on the one long needle that is required for Magic Loop.
Aug 27, 2013 13:11:08   #
Susan from NJ
 
mirl56 wrote:
I prefer making socks/mitten/etc with a different method - 2 at a time on 2 circs. this is not the same as Magic Loop. I like it better as there is not so all the moving stitches around on the one long needle that is required for Magic Loop.


Yes, that's the other method that I found on the internet, but I couldn't quite grasp the concept. Are you knitting in the round for each mitten?
Aug 27, 2013 13:43:44   #
mirl56 (a regular here)
 
Yes. But you have half the stitches of each mitten/sock on the 1st needle and the other half of each on the 2nd needle.

You always keep Needle 1 stitches on Needle 1 and always keep Needle 2 stitches on Needle 2. You knit across the palm of Mitten 1, then across the palm of Mitten 2 all on needle one. then turn your work so the back of the hands are facing you. Knit across the back of the hand of Mitten 2, then knit across the back of the hand of Mitten 1.
Aug 27, 2013 13:56:26   #
Susan from NJ
 
mirl56 wrote:
Yes. But you have half the stitches of each mitten/sock on the 1st needle and the other half of each on the 2nd needle.

You always keep Needle 1 stitches on Needle 1 and always keep Needle 2 stitches on Needle 2. You knit across the palm of Mitten 1, then across the palm of Mitten 2 all on needle one. then turn your work so the back of the hands are facing you. Knit across the back of the hand of Mitten 2, then knit across the back of the hand of Mitten 1.


Great description. Thank you so much. It sounds as if there is a lot of moving stitches as in the single magic loop scenario. I think for me, I will return to using the circular as a straight and do the seaming when it's done.

I do appreciate all the helpfulness that the site members impart.
 
Aug 27, 2013 15:13:24   #
NRoberts (a regular here)
 
I just did a pair of child's mittens (age 3) using Magic Loop. Even did the thumb with my 40 inch cable needle when I could not locate the dpns I had JUST bought!

Worked out great. I am attaching the picture.

Susan from NJ wrote:
I did that but thanks for the reminder.

As it turns out I have mastered the technique thanks to some guidance from you guys. But...and here's the but....I don't like it. I find there is too much wasted time tinkering with the yarn/needles and I can't get into any sort of a rhythm because I'm starting and stopping so often. I also find I'm knitting much tighter than usual. I don't know if that has happened to others, but I am typically a very consistent and even tensioned knitter but not so with this method.

I am committed to finishing this pair but I think I'd rather be faced with sewing a seam at the end of the run than this.

I can see perhaps this system might be okay for larger items but since I'm making children sized mittens, for me it doesn't make sense.

Thank you everyone for your great direction, hints, tips and encouragement.
I did that but thanks for the reminder. br br As ... (show quote)
Rainbow socks and mittens

Aug 28, 2013 07:14:31   #
Susan from NJ
 
NRoberts....They are beautiful. I'm glad you had such success with the method and lots of folks on here seem to. I reverted - yep ripped out what I had done - to my old system of two at a time using the circular as a straight needle.

My knitting was faster, more even and more satisfying to me...but that's just me. I may try the method again at some point but in the mean time I feel satisfied that I accomplished learning the technique.

Thanks for sharing your beautiful mittens and socks.
Aug 28, 2013 07:40:13   #
NRoberts (a regular here)
 
Since joining kp I have learned many methods for knitting socks and mittens. Find the one that works best for you.

Susan from NJ wrote:
NRoberts....They are beautiful. I'm glad you had such success with the method and lots of folks on here seem to. I reverted - yep ripped out what I had done - to my old system of two at a time using the circular as a straight needle.

My knitting was faster, more even and more satisfying to me...but that's just me. I may try the method again at some point but in the mean time I feel satisfied that I accomplished learning the technique.

Thanks for sharing your beautiful mittens and socks.
NRoberts....They are beautiful. I'm glad you had ... (show quote)
Aug 28, 2013 07:42:18   #
Susan from NJ
 
"Since joining kp I have learned many methods for knitting socks and mittens. Find the one that works best for you."

Best advice...thanks and have a great day!
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