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Main
real blocking vs. the steam iron...
If you would like to post a reply, then please login (if you already have an account) or register (if you don't).
Sep 11, 2013 07:11:10   #
barbara perpoli
 
What's the difference between real blocking on a mat...or just steam ironing the piece?
 
Sep 11, 2013 07:30:49   #
dragonflylace (a regular here)
 
I use steaming (not ironing; the iron doesn't touch the item) for acrylics and Wet Blocking for all of my natural products (wool, alpaca, silk, cotton, etc).

I just recently blocked a scarf that was an acrylic wool blend. I actually did both...I got it wet and pinned it to my twin bed to dry and before I removed the pins, I ran the steam iron over it. This might have been over kill, but it worked.

There are many opinions, but from my experiences, you don't want to get wool as hot as steam. I just soak my wool scarves, etc. in warm water, rinse in cool water and then block. Some wools will felt if they get too hot.

This may not be the reason for not steaming wool, but I always stick with what works and what I learned from reading books on blocking. Steam is never mentioned when blocking woolens.

I hope this helps a little.
Sep 11, 2013 08:13:28   #
shel01
 
Dragonflylace, can I also pick your brains too please. Doing a lace project at the moment, only just started so will be a while before I need to block. The yarn is 50% cotton, 50% acrylic, so would the best way for this to be as you suggested for the wool/acrylic blend?

Thanks

Shel x
Sep 11, 2013 16:43:02   #
dragonflylace (a regular here)
 
shel01 wrote:
Dragonflylace, can I also pick your brains too please. Doing a lace project at the moment, only just started so will be a while before I need to block. The yarn is 50% cotton, 50% acrylic, so would the best way for this to be as you suggested for the wool/acrylic blend?

Thanks

Shel x


It worked so well for me. Below is a picture of what I blocked. I just rinsed it in warm water in my tub, and then in cool water...blocked for a day or so until dry...then I steamed it. It came out just how I wanted it to, and it wasn't too much trouble either.
Waves of the Atlantic - Acrylic/wool blend

Sep 12, 2013 09:15:27   #
comebackknitter
 
Beautiful!
Sep 12, 2013 09:17:27   #
shel01
 
Stunning! And thanks for your advice x
 
Sep 12, 2013 09:34:37   #
AlderRose (a regular here)
 
Dragonfly,
Your shawl pin is awesome.

It's hard to know which way to go or if you need to do both blocking and steaming with these yarns with fiber mixes. It scared the living tar out out of me to steam a baby shawl I knitted. It's amazing how steaming that shawl has helped it to hold its own through all that young momma puts it through.
Sep 12, 2013 09:36:38   #
knit-faced
 
Sorry I cannot provide click-on links ... in your browser type 'knitty.com,' when you get to the site, in their search box, type 'blocking,' when the selection list appears, choose the first one, 'to block or not.' That is some of the absolute, best info compiled on the subject. There is also tons of info documented here on KP ... I am not as versed providing instructions for this site. I DO promote blocking, it is a game-changer!

Best of luck
Sep 12, 2013 10:32:18   #
dragonflylace (a regular here)
 
Pacific Rose wrote:
Dragonfly,
Your shawl pin is awesome.

It's hard to know which way to go or if you need to do both blocking and steaming with these yarns with fiber mixes. It scared the living tar out out of me to steam a baby shawl I knitted. It's amazing how steaming that shawl has helped it to hold its own through all that young momma puts it through.


The pin is from Lantern Moon...I actually purchased it from a LYS in Arkansas when I went home for a visit...but here is a link to purchase...Lantern Moon makes so many beautiful pins for shawls.

http://www.yarnsupply.com/74002.html?kw=74002&cmp=googleshopping&gclid=CP76p92JxrkCFabm7AodwzwA9A
Sep 12, 2013 13:20:27   #
Cheryl Jaeger (a regular here)
 
Dragonflylace, your shawl is so pretty!

Beautiful color and very nicely done :thumbup:
Sep 12, 2013 21:31:04   #
SwampCatNana
 
This is the link to blocking info on Knitty
KP no longer allows shortened URLs such as tinyurl.com
So, here is the link with all 495 characters:

http://www.google.com/custom?domains=http%3A%2F%2Fknitty.com&sitesearch=http%3A%2F%2Fknitty.com&client=pub-6971206899099375&forid=1&ie=ISO-8859-1&oe=ISO-8859-1&cof=GALT%3A%23008000%3BGL%3A1%3BDIV%3A%23FF00CC%3BVLC%3A666666%3BAH%3Acenter%3BBGC%3AFFFFFF%3BLBGC%3AFFFFFF%3BALC%3A333333%3BLC%3A333333%3BT%3A333333%3BGFNT%3A0000FF%3BGIMP%3A0000FF%3BLH%3A50%3BLW%3A400%3BL%3Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fknitty.com%2Fimages%2Fknittysearch.gif%3BS%3Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fknitty.com%3BFORID%3A1%3B&hl=en&q=blocking&x=-907&y=-50

ETA: It seems KP shortens the originals on its own.
 
Sep 19, 2013 20:52:41   #
krestiekrew (a regular here)
 
dragonflylace wrote:
It worked so well for me. Below is a picture of what I blocked. I just rinsed it in warm water in my tub, and then in cool water...blocked for a day or so until dry...then I steamed it. It came out just how I wanted it to, and it wasn't too much trouble either.


can you post a link to that pattern???? love it!
Sep 20, 2013 07:07:06   #
dragonflylace (a regular here)
 
krestiekrew wrote:
can you post a link to that pattern???? love it!


Certainly. It is one of my patterns. I looked at a picture of a scarf and just started knitting and now, I really love it and have made two more.

You can find it here:

http://www.knittingparadise.com/t-198822-1.html

It is on a thread I have each week called the Lace Party!

Thanks so much for asking!

Dragonflylace
Sep 20, 2013 07:58:39   #
RoxyCatlady (a regular here)
 
Some people wet the project first (not always soaking wet, sometimes just dampening it) then pull it out to shape, anchor it, and let it dry. This is the flat blocking you mention. Advantages - wetting the fibre first allows it to "slip" around better, evening out the stitches, and allowing them to stretch into place.

Others will pin out the project to shape/size, then either mist it or steam it to add the moisture after the fact. The steam, being hot, may also slightly melt some of the man-made fibres like acrylic. This will change the shape and size and feel of the acrylic permanently.

The major difference, in my opinion, is scale. You will be able to stretch out a project (such as a lace shawl) much more with wet blocking, and often lace needs that "severe" blocking to look good. If you are making a sweater, and are close to the size and shape, you might want to lay it out to the exact correct measurements, then lightly dampen it and let it dry just to smooth it all out prior to seaming. So, the method used will depend on the end result you wish to get.
Sep 20, 2013 08:30:58   #
kaykay1650
 
That is beautiful! I wanted to add that I block my lace work by placing in warm water then squeeze excess followed by rolling in a towel to get out as much water as possible. I then use blocking wires.
 
          
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