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Main
Knitting with two strands of yarn - How to avoid tangling.
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Jul 23, 2011 22:01:46   #
Esperanza1
 
I am knitting a baby afghan holding one strand of yellow and one strand of white together but I have to spend most of the time untangling the two strands. As soon as I start knitting, they start twisting around together again. Is there a way to prevent this from happening? I have the 2 colors in different bags and keep them a few inches away from each other, but still the two strands continue to twist together. Does anyone there has a suggestion on how to eliminate this problem? This is my first project in about 20 years and I am enjoying it very much other than this tangling nuisance.

Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Just by daily reading your articles and quorum discussions I am getting great ideas and advice. Thank you so much for all the accumulated wisdom you are offering. Your website is a treasure.
Thank you in advance.
 
Jul 23, 2011 22:34:28   #
TammyK (a regular here)
 
If you are knitting flat and turning at the end of each row, trying turning in opposite directions every other row. You probably are turning your needle in the same direction at the end of each row because it is something we do out of habit without really thinking about it, so with each turn you are twisting the two strands together in the same direction. If you turn clockwise on odd rows and counterclockwise on even rows you undo each twist before it gets out of hand.
Jul 24, 2011 05:34:47   #
diziescott
 
I have heard that it helps to put each ball in it's own ziploc (resealable) bag with a tiny hole in the corner. Bring the working yarn through the little hole, and the bulk of the yarn stays in the bag, so no tangling. I haven't been brave enough to try two strand knitting yet, so I haven't tried this technique and can't tell you how it works. Just thought I'd pass it along. Good luck! I'd love to see your blanket when you finish.
Jul 24, 2011 05:35:11   #
74mdb
 
I read this tip somewhere and used it on my last project. Cut a short length (about 2") of a drinking straw, thread your yarn through it at the beginning. It will keep your yarns separated and tangle free!
Jul 24, 2011 06:08:30   #
Susie cue
 
hi good idea about the straws i was going to buy myself two
bags for my wool the special ones with the holes in the tops
they are quite expensive so i will try the straws it will be
cheaper

susie cue uk
Jul 24, 2011 06:16:17   #
mac.worrall (a regular here)
 
In frustration with a similar pattern I rewound the two balls of wool together in to one big ball,then knitted.
 
Jul 24, 2011 07:23:47   #
sushiminaice
 
mac.worrall wrote:
In frustration with a similar pattern I rewound the two balls of wool together in to one big ball,then knitted.


i did that with four colors then undid it because one of the colors was shorter than the others. frustrating to undo too :(
Jul 24, 2011 07:33:06   #
Sharolynn16
 
It can be painful knitting with two balls of wool , but i put mine in a plastic container big enough to hold them and put a hole in each end,otherwise the suggestion of twisting the wool in opposite directions is a good one .Good Luck
Sharolynn16
Jul 24, 2011 07:36:37   #
tamarque (a regular here)
 
All of these are good ideas. For myself, I wind the two strands together. Just did that with some baby alpaca and it was too easy to work with this way.
Jul 24, 2011 08:03:08   #
Carlaallaire
 
TammyK wrote:
If you are knitting flat and turning at the end of each row, trying turning in opposite directions every other row. You probably are turning your needle in the same direction at the end of each row because it is something we do out of habit without really thinking about it, so with each turn you are twisting the two strands together in the same direction. If you turn clockwise on odd rows and counterclockwise on even rows you undo each twist before it gets out of hand.


Ditto. I think the yarn just naturally wants to twist clockwise, so I turn counter clockwise every time I turn and don't have a problem.
Jul 24, 2011 08:43:31   #
Sallyflymi
 
Used the straw method when making a marketing bag. Worked just great. Still have all of my hair.
 
Jul 24, 2011 09:12:01   #
dawn b
 
I have found that having the 2 strands wound together is helpful. I also learned both strands need to be the same weight (if you wind with a ball winder). If they are two different weights, the tension will pull on the thicker yarn, allowing the thinner yarn to be longer. Then when knitting you have to constantly push the extra length of the thin yarn down. This can become a tangled mess too.
Jul 24, 2011 09:20:34   #
kkiser
 
If you are able to knit both continental style and English style, use one color for continental and the other for English. Keep the English-style wool on your right and the continental-style wool on your left. No twists!
Jul 24, 2011 09:20:47   #
kkiser
 
If you are able to knit both continental style and English style, use one color for continental and the other for English. Keep the English-style wool on your right and the continental-style wool on your left. No twists!
Jul 24, 2011 09:36:35   #
mousepotato
 
Esperanza1 wrote:
I am knitting a baby afghan holding one strand of yellow and one strand of white together but I have to spend most of the time untangling the two strands. As soon as I start knitting, they start twisting around together again. Is there a way to prevent this from happening? I have the 2 colors in different bags and keep them a few inches away from each other, but still the two strands continue to twist together. Does anyone there has a suggestion on how to eliminate this problem? This is my first project in about 20 years and I am enjoying it very much other than this tangling nuisance.

Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Just by daily reading your articles and quorum discussions I am getting great ideas and advice. Thank you so much for all the accumulated wisdom you are offering. Your website is a treasure.
Thank you in advance.
I am knitting a baby afghan holding one strand of ... (show quote)


If you are working with both strands held together and knitting with both at the same time, don't worry about it, you don't have to keep them from twisting that is going to happen anyway in the stitch.

Now, if you are working fair isle or intarsia, that's a different issue. Fair Isle requires you to twist the yarns periodically as you change colors, and those do need to be untwisted so they don't drive you crazy. Put each ball in it's own zip top bag and simply suspend them over the edge of a table and let them untwist themselves. For intarsia either pull out strands a couple of yards long and just pull them out of the twisted yarns as needed, or wind several yards onto bobbins, unwinding only enough yarn to work with for each section of color, again, if they tangle, suspend them over the edge of a table to untwist periodically.
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