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Red Heart Yarn Substitution & Pattern Question
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Jul 29, 2011 06:41:40   #
eggplantlady
 
Good morning! I found the following pattern yesterday and would like to try it, however, I don't want to use Red Heart and can't figure out the substitution. The gauge is 16sts and 24 rows = 4", however, when I look at the Red Heart Stardust that they list for the pattern, that yarn is listed as a super fine yarn. That doesn't make sense to me...how can a super fine yarn, even with size 9 needles have that gauge? Am I missing something? If you look at the picture it doesn't look like it is made with worsted or even heavier. What weight should I use? I would like it to be thinner that worsted if possible.

Here is the link: http://www.redheart.com/free-patterns/four-seasons-knit-vest

Thanks!
 
Jul 29, 2011 06:46:54   #
courier770
 
It's possible that it's knit with more than one strand of yarn.
Jul 29, 2011 09:50:13   #
muppet
 
It is a fine yarn, usually knitted on US2 needles, but because they want it to come out loose and holey (lacy) they use large needles. Have you tried the tension square over the lacy pattern, I am sure I am correct in this,Looking closely at the pattern, that is what it looks like to, me anyone else?
Jul 29, 2011 09:55:15   #
5mmdpns
 
"GAUGE: 16 sts = 4”; 24 rows = 4” in Mesh Pattern with knitting needles. " This is what the pattern says.

The yarn is a #1 super fine weight. Since the pattern specifically says the gauge is in a mesh pattern, it makes absolute sense to go with a 5.5mm needle. The gauge on the yarn ball says 30 stitches per 4" swatch and that will be for stocking stitch using a 2.75 mm needle. You cannot go by that gauge. Trust in what the pattern is telling you! :) :thumbup:
Jul 29, 2011 09:58:44   #
eggplantlady
 
Okay, thanks to all! I'll buy about 800 yards of lace weight yarn today. Yes, that means I'll have 3 interesting but reasonably simple patterns going at once, but I really NEED the fiber therapy right now!
Jul 29, 2011 10:02:56   #
5mmdpns
 
"PATTERN STITCH
Mesh Pattern (multiple of 4 sts)
Row 1 (Wrong Side): *K2tog, [yo] twice, k2tog; repeat
from * to end of row.
Row 2: *K2, p1, k1; repeat from * to end of row.
Row 3: K2, *k2tog, [yo] twice, k2tog; repeat from * to last 2
sts, k2.
Row 4: K2, *k2, p1, k1; repeat from * to last 2 sts, k2.
Repeat Rows 1–4 for Mesh Pattern." from the pattern.

Make sure you first of all do this swatch test using the mesh pattern. And cast on at least 20 stitches to do this swatch in. After knitting the swatch, spray with water and block it out on a towel, then measure when dry.
Keep your receipts for the yarn!! If the yarn you choose is not to your liking, you can return the unused balls with the receipt. :) Good luck with this, I had considered making this vest about a year ago and decided that I am not really a "vest" person. So I didn't make it. Made a pair of socks instead!!
 
Jul 30, 2011 07:51:26   #
jemima
 
Thanks eggplantlady This looks just the sort of pattern I have been searching for .I have some very fine cotton yarn with bobbles that I hope will be suitable.
Jul 30, 2011 08:28:17   #
mousepotato
 
eggplantlady wrote:
Okay, thanks to all! I'll buy about 800 yards of lace weight yarn today. Yes, that means I'll have 3 interesting but reasonably simple patterns going at once, but I really NEED the fiber therapy right now!


No, that stuff in the pattern is not laceweight yarn, it's sock weight yarn (baby or fingering yarn). Don't go laceweight, it's too small.
Jul 30, 2011 09:35:03   #
LilgirlCA (a regular here)
 
On that particular pattern, the guage is given for the MESH stitch pattern. It has holes in it. So the larger gauge on a finer yarn may be correct. Try it

If still unsure, go to a store and look at that particular yarn. Then you will know what size yarn to get, even if another brand and material.
Jul 30, 2011 09:49:26   #
5mmdpns
 
No, that stuff in the pattern is not laceweight yarn, it's sock weight yarn (baby or fingering yarn). Don't go laceweight, it's too small.
Mousepotato


Depending on what yarn manufacturer it is making the yarn, the #1 weight yarn is called lace weight, fine, super fine, baby yarn, or fingering yarn. All three names are correct for a #1 weight of yarn. I have yet to see a knitting yarn less than a #1 weight. There are crochet cotton threads and these weights are not in the same weight category as the knitting yarns. However, you can knit doilies and other lace with the crochet cotton. Yarn is all good for knitting and crocheting our projects!! What would we do without it? Hehe, I guess we would all own at least one sheep and spin our own yarns!! (What a thought for those with allergies to wool! I guess the alpaca would have to do!) :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:
Jul 30, 2011 10:04:18   #
past
 
The gauge for the pattern is 16 stitches and 24 rows in the lace patttern based on a size 9 needle US, however the gauge listed for the yarn is 30 stitches 40 rows on size 2 US. I would think that if you look at yarn based on the 30 stitches/40 rows in size 2 you would come close to the pattern gauge using a much larger needle.
 
Jul 30, 2011 10:15:22   #
5mmdpns
 
past wrote:
The gauge for the pattern is 16 stitches and 24 rows in the lace patttern based on a size 9 needle US, however the gauge listed for the yarn is 30 stitches 40 rows on size 2 US. I would think that if you look at yarn based on the 30 stitches/40 rows in size 2 you would come close to the pattern gauge using a much larger needle.


You cant cant cant go by the gauge on the yarn label. The gauge to be used is the mesh pattern as per the knitting pattern instructions. You go by the yarn weight listed on the pattern and then do a gauge swatch using the mesh pattern. The gauge that is on EVERY yarn label is for stocking stitch. This is not what the pattern is calling for since there is no stocking stitch in the vest. One of the biggest mistakes a knitter can make is not reading the pattern instructions properly. :thumbup:
Jul 30, 2011 10:52:40   #
eggplantlady
 
Thank you all - I'll be at the yarn store in a few hours and will take everyone's advice!
Jul 30, 2011 11:20:45   #
mousepotato
 
5mmdpns wrote:
No, that stuff in the pattern is not laceweight yarn, it's sock weight yarn (baby or fingering yarn). Don't go laceweight, it's too small.
Mousepotato


Depending on what yarn manufacturer it is making the yarn, the #1 weight yarn is called lace weight, fine, super fine, baby yarn, or fingering yarn. All three names are correct for a #1 weight of yarn. I have yet to see a knitting yarn less than a #1 weight. There are crochet cotton threads and these weights are not in the same weight category as the knitting yarns. However, you can knit doilies and other lace with the crochet cotton. Yarn is all good for knitting and crocheting our projects!! What would we do without it? Hehe, I guess we would all own at least one sheep and spin our own yarns!! (What a thought for those with allergies to wool! I guess the alpaca would have to do!) :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:
No, that stuff in the pattern is not laceweight ya... (show quote)


This is true, but actual laceweight yarn is about half the size of fingering weight yarn, and is often classed as size 0 for this purpose. You'd need two strands of true laceweight yarn to equal fingering. Depending on where you buy your yarns you may get a weird look if you ask for laceweight (I've never seen true laceweight at a mass merchandise craft store), or Zephyr in an LYS.
Jul 30, 2011 11:32:16   #
Wyldflower
 
The yarn is 190 yards to a 50 gram skein... I'd use that as my guide ... seems like sock weight to me.
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