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Afghan has uneven sides - help!
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Aug 6, 2011 21:30:13   #
TheresaD
 
I have knitted an afghan on the diagonal, with several different patterns. Now I am trying to knit the border and have discovered that not all the sides are the same size.Three sides are about the same length, but the fourth side is about 2 inches longer. Any ideas?? Should I measure out the length each side is supposed to be, cut a string to that length, attach it and single crochet - adding or subtracting stitches so that each side is like it is supposed to be. (I'm sorry if this is confusing.) Ripping it out is not an option. I'd rather have each side a different length than have to reknit the whole thing. I wonder why my diagonal knitting leaves one side longer?


 
Aug 6, 2011 21:54:51   #
NJgardengal
 
Two inches is not a lot given the size of your GORGEOUS afghan!
If you think the difference in length will show, you could EASE the long side by working the long side with a SLIGHTLY tighter gauge. If your border has more than one round, I would ease a bit on each round.
By the time the border is complete, the sides will be even.
Aug 6, 2011 22:21:59   #
headlemk
 
That is an absolutely beautiful pattern. Can you share?
Aug 6, 2011 22:26:48   #
e.ridenh
 
Can you float another pic in and just flatten out that uneven side, snap a shot of it only - for a better view?

You're doing an intricate pattern there and I don't understand how you didn't catch it as you went........but, if you were to SC the edge, you might find that in some cases a taller stitch would work, too or even a combo.

I see this all the time in crochet where folks don't work that last stich (the CH 3, etc.) as it isn't a stitch, it's just a chain and they start shortening their row widths, they don't catch it until they're way into the project so I suggest they live with it and putting a border on it.

Some places require just the SC but if it dips more on the same row, then a HDC is needed, etc. Once they get it even, then a final round could be put on then I advise a RSC (reverse single crochet).

What I'm saying about yours is that I can't see the entire uneven side flattened out; there's a tuck or something on the left side.

So, flip another pic, perhaps and I can look it over.

TTYL!

Donna Rae
~~~~~~~~
TheresaD wrote:
I have knitted an afghan on the diagonal, with several different patterns. Now I am trying to knit the border and have discovered that not all the sides are the same size.Three sides are about the same length, but the fourth side is about 2 inches longer. Any ideas?? Should I measure out the length each side is supposed to be, cut a string to that length, attach it and single crochet - adding or subtracting stitches so that each side is like it is supposed to be. (I'm sorry if this is confusing.) Ripping it out is not an option. I'd rather have each side a different length than have to reknit the whole thing. I wonder why my diagonal knitting leaves one side longer?
I have knitted an afghan on the diagonal, with sev... (show quote)
Aug 6, 2011 22:33:53   #
TheresaD
 
Actually the side is longer than the other 3 sides. I checked stitches numbers as I went along, and they were all correct. It seems like one side is looser, but since I'm doing the same stitches on each side, I don't see how I could be doing this. Maybe I should figure out if it happened when I was increasing or when I was decreasing.
Aug 6, 2011 22:37:18   #
TheresaD
 
Do you think I should make the same number of crochet stitches on each side to start with, or make the number of stitches fit the current length and then decrease as needed to make them even?
 
Aug 6, 2011 22:40:07   #
zipknitter
 
Is the side length different on one side or is the length different on the top or bottom edge. It does make a difference in figuring out what went wrong. If a side edge is longer it is possible that you didn't tighten up the last and/or first st on that side. That is a problem several of my students had in my knit classes. The easiest way to solve the problem is when you put an edging on, to mark the side with the problem and do a short row section along the edge to accommodate the extra length.
It really isn't hard to do if you understand how to do short rows. You can lay it out flat, use safety pins to mark the longest corner and then measure all the way across from either top to bottom or side to side to see just where the measurements start getting longer. You should measure about every 3 to 5 inches until you find it and then start to measure every inch or so when you do find it so you can tell exactly where the difference in length starts. In between the pins is the area that you need to do the short rows. Once the edging corrects the difference in length, then you just start working all the way across. A ruffled edging will be the best choice so that no one will ever notice that the short rows are there and the end result will totally mask any problems. Hope that is clear.
Aug 6, 2011 22:47:40   #
TheresaD
 
This sounds like what I need to do for the best solution. The edging that came with it is knit separately and sewed on, but I hate knitting that edging because it is 20 stitches wide at its widest and goes down to 14 stitches, with yo's and decreases. After about 3 feet, I am bored, so I like the idea of ruffles.
Aug 6, 2011 22:50:18   #
Dar19Knits
 
Although it is unfortunate the sides are uneven, the afghan is gorgeous! I agree with Donna Rae on a relatively easy repair. GOod luck!
Aug 6, 2011 22:57:08   #
zipknitter
 
I should have said you did a really nice job and made a lovely afghan. I rarely make anything plain and my normal afghan has from 6 to 18 patterns worked at one time. Could you share what patterns you used or the site you found the pattern on?
Aug 6, 2011 23:26:56   #
Jessica-Jean (a regular here)
 
I have bought a few gorgeous afghans.(I could have made them, but the price was less than the yarn would have cost, even thrift shop yarn, AND the quality of the workmanship was excellent.) Almost without exception - knit or crocheted - they have one end longer than its mate. Most of my own are guilty of the same 'fault'. I've studied them to try to determine what happened. My conclusion is relaxation. The stitcher relaxed as s/he got accustomed to the pattern, and the fabric became looser. The bigger the afghan, the bigger the difference in the 'defect'.

Of note, a cursory look at them does not reveal any differences. It's only when folding, that the trapazoidal shape is revealed. They are warm, cuddly, and definitely not fodder for a dumpster or even the frog pond. Spread on a bed, they are gorgeous!

My guess as to what happened to yours is that your selvedge (end stitch(s) of each row are not identical on every row. That would make a difference, especially over a longer edge.

Solution? [i]I[i] would work a row of single crochet along the shortest edge; count how many single crochets; work the other edges to match - working as many decreases as necessary to equal it; work another round (of sc or whatever) around to even out the look of the decreases.

Hope this helps.
 
Aug 7, 2011 01:21:58   #
Poledra65 (a regular here)
 
Whatever you did, the pattern you knitted is absolutely beautiful.
Kaye
Aug 7, 2011 01:28:40   #
Dreamweaver
 
It sure is a gorgeous afgahn. I would be happy to display as is, but I know these ladies have given you several ways to even it out. You did a beautiful job.
Aug 7, 2011 07:40:44   #
babybop
 
It is a lovely Afghan.
Aug 7, 2011 09:51:53   #
funthreads623
 
try this: take a tapestry needle (or even a crochet hook) and weave a heavy type firm yarn or thread from one end of the "too-long" edge to the other...spread it out, and without touching the afghan, hold your iron on high steam just above it (or cover it, and use a back to front motion) and at the same time, smooth it toward the outside edge...you can "ease" in several inches this way. Measure and continue until it matches. You can pull the thread tighter as you go. Leave this in until it is dry, and you can also leave it in until your edging is finished. Then, out it comes, and you have matching sides. I have a steamer that I got just for my knits, if you have one, use it instead of the iron. good luck, and please let us know how it comes out.
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