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Main
thicker toes and heels of socks
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Jan 28, 2014 15:51:00   #
Joan L
 
I am never content to do the "usual" thing, as most of you. I've done a few socks now (and love it), but I was wondering about making the toes and heels a little thicker and wanted to run my idea(s) past you for feedback. I knit using the magic loop method, toe-up.I think the easiest way to do this is to simply use 2 strands of sock yarn to knit the toes and heels. If anyone has done this, does it work well for you, or is it too thick?

Someone at some point mentioned using roving, but I don't know how that works.

Any idea of how a person could knit a sock making the sole-side thicker, but not the upper foot?

I hope my questions make sense. I'm trying to come up with something for my daughter who does a lot of running, and gets blisters on her toes and heels.

Thanks, Joan L
 
Jan 28, 2014 15:53:49   #
VocalLisa (suspended)
 
Joan L wrote:
I am never content to do the "usual" thing, as most of you. I've done a few socks now (and love it), but I was wondering about making the toes and heels a little thicker and wanted to run my idea(s) past you for feedback. I knit using the magic loop method, toe-up.I think the easiest way to do this is to simply use 2 strands of sock yarn to knit the toes and heels. If anyone has done this, does it work well for you, or is it too thick?

Someone at some point mentioned using roving, but I don't know how that works.

Any idea of how a person could knit a sock making the sole-side thicker, but not the upper foot?

I hope my questions make sense. I'm trying to come up with something for my daughter who does a lot of running, and gets blisters on her toes and heels.

Thanks, Joan L
I am never content to do the "usual" thi... (show quote)


If you knit with a smaller needle size for those specific parts, makes the fabric denser/thicker.
Jan 28, 2014 16:25:15   #
chickkie (a regular here)
 
Using the yarn double will produce a thicker toe and heel, but I think it would be uncomfortable for the person wearing the sock. That is like mixing 4 ply yarn and DK in the same project - completely different gauge for that.

You would have to knit far less stitches for the toes and heels than you would for regular sock yarn or those areas would be too big.
Jan 28, 2014 16:48:30   #
mopgenorth
 
Generally speaking, handknit socks are not a good choice for athletic wear, especially running. Plus, if you were to use two strands of sock yarn, it may make render her unable to wear her running shoes comfortably due to the added bulk.

My recommendation would be for your daughter to wear commercially manufactured socks that are designed specifically for running - this would help eliminate blisters and soreness.

She could also try wearing a sock liner, again specifically designed for athletic use such as running, inside the socks you make for her, which will provide some protection from friction without adding bulk.

You could also do as recommended above and knit with a smaller size needle to make the heels, toes, and soles denser, hence providing a firmer, denser fabric as well as knit the sole with the purl stitches on the outside and the knit stitches on the side. This helps people with sensitive feet, such as diabetics, because the inside of the sock will be softer and the unevenness of the purl bumps will be on the outside instead of rubbing against the soles of the feet.

Good luck!
Jan 28, 2014 17:00:08   #
PRIN4
 
Periodically at some yarn shops I find small spools of very fine yarn specifically made to knit into heels and toes. It is very fine and you just knit it along with the strand(s) you are knitting. It comes in many colors and I've used it on and off for years when I make socks. I believe it is German made but I can't remember the name. Sorry.
Jan 28, 2014 17:04:21   #
chickkie (a regular here)
 
PRIN4 wrote:
Periodically at some yarn shops I find small spools of very fine yarn specifically made to knit into heels and toes. It is very fine and you just knit it along with the strand(s) you are knitting. It comes in many colors and I've used it on and off for years when I make socks. I believe it is German made but I can't remember the name. Sorry.


I have some of those cardboard packets of this kind of yarn listed in today's classified section.
 
Jan 28, 2014 17:14:32   #
desireeross
 
I do that and I knit a heel stitch from the ball of the foot
Jan 28, 2014 20:32:57   #
deemail (a regular here)
 
I pull off 5 yards of my sock yarn, split it into 2 even pcs, and pull apart....each 5 yd pc is enough to knit along with the normal yarn for ONE sock's heel and ONE toe to make them a bit tougher without adding too much thickness....(thus the 5 yd pc does both socks)

However, i would second the one comment about special running socks...you will need weeks to knit a sock as fine and tiny as the professionally knit runners' socks....
Jan 29, 2014 08:15:54   #
BeadsbyBeadz
 
I've never knit a sock so no help there but I would recommend Moleskin which can be purchased at any pharmacy for the blisters. Socks may not be the problem, perhaps having her shoe fitted by a good shop? I dunno, I gave up running 50 years ago when I let my husband 'catch me.'
Jan 29, 2014 08:35:38   #
wilderness2000
 
You could try this technique;
http://knitty.com/ISSUEsummer08/FEATsum08TT.html
Jan 29, 2014 08:51:45   #
lostarts (a regular here)
 
Two strands of fingering weight sock yarn is the same weight as worsted weight yarn.

It won't knit to the same gauge.

The finer the yarn, the smoother the fabric knit from it. Worsted with make a rougher sock that's harder on your feet, although it'll probably be durable, but bigger than the rest of the sock, so it might be loose enough to rub and cause blisters.

If you want the bottoms, toes and heels heavier, you might want to check out Elizabeth Zimmerman's moccasin socks. She knits the leg and top of the foot, then knits the heel, bottom of the foot and toe separately, and sews the two of them together.

My feet blister if I even look at socks that are not smooth. I wouldn't want seams down the sides of my socks. I also hate to sew seams.

But you can do it.
 
Jan 29, 2014 11:52:20   #
MsKathy
 
I noticed that the areas of my socks were wearing holes in two areas; the heel and the ball of the foot. Big holes in no time at all. (I wear my socks indoors without shoes on hardwood floors). I am getting good results by knitting a purl row and a knit row in these two areas. I just knit on the sole, going from gusset to gusset, and then switch back to knitting only across the instep on the top of the sock.
You just have to carefully keep up with the rows you do that on so both socks are identical. (I use a 9" circular).

I was very interested in Dee's method of splitting a strand of yarn. I want to try that. I guess it comes down to trial and error of what works for you. One thing I learned right up front; I cannot use acrylic yarn. I walk right out of them!
Jan 29, 2014 12:02:09   #
storp
 
Run a strand of mohair in the toes and heels. This makes it thicker and much harder to wear through.
Jan 29, 2014 13:09:13   #
chickkie (a regular here)
 
MsKathy wrote:
I noticed that the areas of my socks were wearing holes in two areas; the heel and the ball of the foot. Big holes in no time at all. (I wear my socks indoors without shoes on hardwood floors). I am getting good results by knitting a purl row and a knit row in these two areas. I just knit on the sole, going from gusset to gusset, and then switch back to knitting only across the instep on the top of the sock.
You just have to carefully keep up with the rows you do that on so both socks are identical. (I use a 9" circular).

I was very interested in Dee's method of splitting a strand of yarn. I want to try that. I guess it comes down to trial and error of what works for you. One thing I learned right up front; I cannot use acrylic yarn. I walk right out of them!
I noticed that the areas of my socks were wearing ... (show quote)


socks will wear out quickly when you don't wear shoes or slippers with them
Jan 29, 2014 13:35:59   #
MsKathy
 
I know its a "no no", but I just can't stand to wear shoes in the house. I'm either barefoot or in socks. That means I will just have to deal with the consequences. lol!
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