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Fixing errors in garter stitch
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Aug 21, 2011 13:01:32   #
beadness
 
Since I've knit a couple of Baby Surprise Jackets, I've been intrigued by other baby patterns using garter stitch. It's so squishy and comfortable, I'm sure any baby would enjoy wearing it. The problem is, if the yarn is a little splitty or you're knitting with fingering yarn as I have been doing, I've noticed that a couple of times I've not gone into the stitch correctly but picked up the yarn below the stitch or I've just split the stitch entirely. Being a perfectionist, I could never just leave this be, but after unladdering to the offending stitch, it's tricky to knit them back up. You could just keep taking out the crochet hook and putting it back in from the opposite side so as to knit each row, or doing it from one side just remove the crochet hook and go into the stitch from the back to purl the stitch on that side. There is probably an easier way, maybe with one of those little tools that look like a miniature rug hooking tool. I also heard one time there is such a thing that has hooks on both ends. Does anyone have a suggestion for me or have any idea what I'm talking about. It's a little hard to explain in words.
 
Aug 21, 2011 13:35:09   #
Loistec
 
Hi Beadness, I love garter stitch and when I drop a stitch I use a smallish crochet hook and alternate inserting from the front and the back up to the top. I use a hook that is rounded on the end so it doesn't split the yarn, a size B for worsted weight yarn works best for me.

Lois
Aug 21, 2011 13:40:21   #
beadness
 
Loistec wrote:
Hi Beadness, I love garter stitch and when I drop a stitch I use a smallish crochet hook and alternate inserting from the front and the back up to the top. I use a hook that is rounded on the end so it doesn't split the yarn, a size B for worsted weight yarn works best for me.

Lois


Hi Lois,
That's what I did, but it was slow to fix and I found a couple spots pretty far back. I thought I had heard that the tool like a small rug hook made it easier. I'll have to look for one of those to keep on hand since I love garter stitch. Now I have to buy a new crochet hook too, I pushed my chair back on a tile floor over the hook that had fallen on the floor. It's pretty bent and got roughed up. Had that one for at least 40 years. Eesh, am I that old?
Aug 21, 2011 14:42:35   #
e.ridenh
 
Couple twelve things (LOL!):

* You'll get so good at unkitting a stitch that you will be more
comfortable. It's amazing how far down you can go ver-
tically to correct a stitch; ignore the ladders and think of
the stitch now off the needle as the '''only one'''.
* If the hook is your choice, put it behind your ear for ease
in retrieving it again.
*****Using the right size crochet hook is essential, too.
For a ww yarn, a size G would work, but would an F
be better? How about an E or D or H? Experiment.
***** For fingering or baby weight yarn, a smaller hook
may be chosen. How about the C or B, perhaps a
D? After those sizes, one would drop into the steels.
* I've knitted for 41 years and have found there's no better
tool, really than the tool in hand - the knitting needle on the
WIP. One makes the stitch with it and being experienced,
the correction can just be made with it.
***** I just sent in a video last night on this subject =
Picking up K & P stitches using the knitting needle;
Tust me, it's slick. Practice that. If it's too far down,
I'd grab another needle of the same size (dpn would
work). After that, I'd use the hook but get the per-
fect size hook.
* Sometimes, it's easier to turn the work over and correct
from the other side (as you mentioned); view for this ease.

A double ended hook won't help you; choose the standard one but getting it the right size is of great importance. I have 600 hooks and 2,000 needles so I don't have to buy another size. LOL!!

You've explained it nicely!! Check for that video I sent in, eh. Wait, I'll see if I can snag it again....I think this is it.....found it, but......I attached the wrong video! I'm on dial up speed now as hubby abused satellite - again! LOL!! So sorry about this, but it can be done with a knitting needle.

I can't get replies but in web mail at this time - 6:45 p.m. today and we're off abuse and back up to sat. speed. LOL!!

Good luck!

Donna Rae
~~~~~~~~~~~
beadness wrote:
Since I've knit a couple of Baby Surprise Jackets, I've been intrigued by other baby patterns using garter stitch. It's so squishy and comfortable, I'm sure any baby would enjoy wearing it. The problem is, if the yarn is a little splitty or you're knitting with fingering yarn as I have been doing, I've noticed that a couple of times I've not gone into the stitch correctly but picked up the yarn below the stitch or I've just split the stitch entirely. Being a perfectionist, I could never just leave this be, but after unladdering to the offending stitch, it's tricky to knit them back up. You could just keep taking out the crochet hook and putting it back in from the opposite side so as to knit each row, or doing it from one side just remove the crochet hook and go into the stitch from the back to purl the stitch on that side. There is probably an easier way, maybe with one of those little tools that look like a miniature rug hooking tool. I also heard one time there is such a thing that has hooks on both ends. Does anyone have a suggestion for me or have any idea what I'm talking about. It's a little hard to explain in words.
Since I've knit a couple of Baby Surprise Jackets,... (show quote)
Aug 21, 2011 14:50:53   #
beadness
 
Thanks Donna Rae,
I've done what you said and have other size hooks as well. I think I was using the right sized one. I got the job done, it just took extra time and I was eager to get the sweater finished. It's all sewn up, just adorable, awaiting me to get off the computer and make some buttons.
Aug 21, 2011 15:52:17   #
nannymaid
 
I too have that problem, especially with larger sized needles. I have tried to correct it a few rows on but I can still see the 'fixing ladder' if you know what I mean. I am a perfectionist too, and as I sell my shawls I find it quicker to just undo and re-knit. Usually I check every 6 rows or so to make sure the stitches are O.K. but sometimes I have still missed one and had to undo quite a number of rows.
 
Aug 21, 2011 18:01:36   #
SEA
 
I have a small crochet hook with a needle on the other side. Bought it at my LYS.Very valuable investment.

I think flipping the work over to the knitting stitch side is easier to pick up the ladder. I can do it rather quickly now.

You could also pick back (un knitting using needles)to the mistake. Done my share of this too.

SEA
Aug 22, 2011 05:26:25   #
PennyCole
 
The other way is to turn your work on each row so you are always coming in from the front. :lol:
Aug 22, 2011 05:47:22   #
RikkiLou
 
SEA wrote:
I have a small crochet hook with a needle on the other side. Bought it at my LYS.Very valuable investment.

I think flipping the work over to the knitting stitch side is easier to pick up the ladder. I can do it rather quickly now.

You could also pick back (un knitting using needles)to the mistake. Done my share of this too.

SEA

Didn't know garter stitch has a front!!chuckle.

I think what you are looking for is advertised as a knit fix it hook, but I'm not sure, I, too, make the corrections from the side that will be worn as the outside of the fabric. Atip--
Aug 22, 2011 06:49:16   #
Aslan
 
I use a small rug type hook that came with one of my knitting machines. It's quick and leaves no tell-tale line in the fabric
Aug 22, 2011 06:52:20   #
Aslan
 
I've just googled latch tools (rug type hook from KM)and Yarn store sell them - about$2.50
 
Aug 22, 2011 09:08:59   #
flginny
 
Donna Rae, I was very interested in your tips on correcting errors in garter stitch work. This is the hardest kind of correction for me; sometimes, I have a hard time telling which stitch is knit from which side, especially when the garter stitches are a small part of a pattern.

I looked for a link to your video but couldn't see it. Would you be willing to post it, please? Thanks!

Virginia
Aug 22, 2011 09:40:06   #
kate severin
 
There is a video on y-tube I used their instructions last night very slick.
the link was in yesterdsy's blog.
Aug 22, 2011 09:49:39   #
past
 
I have a hard time when correcting garter stitch and ribbing. I use a crochet hook and cable hook. I slide the cable hook in so that I can see which direction the next stitch I pick up with the crochet hook needs to go.
Aug 22, 2011 09:56:47   #
MKjane
 
The double ended latch hook you're asking about is called a seed stitcher. Here's a link: http://www.knittingtoday.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Store_Code=KT&Screen=PROD&Product_Code=20011
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