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what is "roving"?
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Dec 9, 2011 17:25:26   #
CarolBest
 
I thought roving was odd pieces of unprocessed fiber.

I looked up up in the dictionary. It says "unrestricted by area."

Bernat has a yarn that they have named "roving." It is bulky weight.

Can anyone tell me what "roving "really is? I am totally confused.
 
Dec 9, 2011 17:27:18   #
Yarngrandma
 
me too!
Dec 9, 2011 17:44:13   #
nittineedles (a regular here)
 
A roving is a long and narrow bundle of fibre. It is usually used to spin woollen yarn. A roving can be created by carding the fibre, and it is then drawn into long strips. Because it is carded, the fibres are not parallel, though drawing it into strips may line the fibres up a bit.
Roving

Dec 9, 2011 18:06:43   #
Yarngrandma
 
nittineedles wrote:
A roving is a long and narrow bundle of fibre. It is usually used to spin woollen yarn. A roving can be created by carding the fibre, and it is then drawn into long strips. Because it is carded, the fibres are not parallel, though drawing it into strips may line the fibres up a bit.


So do you actually knit with it or do you use it for wet felting or are there other options?
Dec 9, 2011 18:17:35   #
nittineedles (a regular here)
 
I spin with it but it could be used for needle felting.
Bernat Roving is just a knitting yarn. It's 80% acrylic so it couldn't be wet felted or any kind of felted for that matter.
Dec 9, 2011 18:53:15   #
Linda6885 (a regular here)
 
A number of yarn companys, including bernat, make a yarn that they call roving. It is a bulky weight, about the thickness of a pencil, it is called a 'single', because it is not plyed. It has very little 'twist' to it. It knits up lofty, and light, and it easy to handle as long as you don't pull on it too hard as it will pull about easily because of the light twist. Also you have to be careful when casting onbecause the twisting motion on casting on stitches can easily untwist the yarn and again it will pull apart. But if you are a little careful, your final item will be soft and worth the trouble.
 
Dec 9, 2011 21:29:19   #
CarolBest
 
nittineedles wrote:
A roving is a long and narrow bundle of fibre. It is usually used to spin woollen yarn. A roving can be created by carding the fibre, and it is then drawn into long strips. Because it is carded, the fibres are not parallel, though drawing it into strips may line the fibres up a bit.

Thank you. That is not what Bernat is selling.
Dec 9, 2011 21:31:57   #
CarolBest
 
Linda6885 wrote:
A number of yarn companys, including bernat, make a yarn that they call roving. It is a bulky weight, about the thickness of a pencil, it is called a 'single', because it is not plyed. It has very little 'twist' to it. It knits up lofty, and light, and it easy to handle as long as you don't pull on it too hard as it will pull about easily because of the light twist. Also you have to be careful when casting onbecause the twisting motion on casting on stitches can easily untwist the yarn and again it will pull apart. But if you are a little careful, your final item will be soft and worth the trouble.
A number of yarn companys, including bernat, make ... (show quote)


Thank you. I will follow your advise if I choose to use it.
Dec 10, 2011 00:15:55   #
Dreamweaver
 
Real roving is prepared fiber for spinning. It is not plied and has no twist. The yarns that are referred to as roving just have that appearance. They can be made of anything and may not have any staple length to give them any strength. Some of them havea thread wrapped around to gove some stability. They are very soft, but most can be pulled apart fairly easily. I think of them as the cotton candy of yarns.
Dec 10, 2011 09:08:21   #
ktdeluxe
 
As someone said, it is fairly thick yarn, unplied. And that is what I hate about it. I like to watch TV or read while I am knitting something not complicated. Can't do it with roving: because it is not plied, I find myself accidentally inserting the needle into the middle of the next stitch, instead of the whole piece of yarn, effectively not knitting the whole stitch and leaving half of it hanging out there. And then I look at in about 5 minutes and it's frogging time (again). I do admire those who make lovely things out of roving. Just not for me.
Dec 10, 2011 10:19:56   #
Dowager
 
I recently became aware of a kind of mittens called "THRUMS", on here actually. They are made by inserting small pieces of "roving" into the stitches here and there, so that the ends of the "roving" are loose on the inside of the mitten, making a very soft, very warm lining. Supposed to be much warmer than "regular" mittens. The pictures I saw show that it makes a sort of polka dot pattern on the outside of the mitten. I am anxious to try a pair of these myself once my knitting skills reach that level.
 
Dec 10, 2011 16:05:50   #
Farmor
 
I have been knitting thrummed mittens for my mom. Her hands get very cold. These mittens are the warmest ever. They are knit with worsted weight yarn and every 4th stitch and every 4th row a thrum ( small piece of roving) is knit with the yarn. If you use a plain, color like red and use white roving, you will have a red with white stitches showing. At first it seems a bit fiddly and awkward, but after a while you get in a rhythm and the knitting goes pretty quickly.
Dec 10, 2011 16:20:56   #
nittineedles (a regular here)
 
I knit a pair of thrummed mittens and slippers for my son when he was working in Alberta.
Thrummed Mittens

Thrummed Slippers

Dec 10, 2011 16:42:09   #
Farmor
 
Ooh, I bet those slippers are warm.
Dec 10, 2011 19:12:31   #
Tanglewoodfarm
 
roving is fiber that has been washed(in most cases) and then has been carded(kind of like combing or brushing it it) to make all the individual fibers or hairs align the same way instead of being scattered about every which way. It is this "aligned" fiber that spinners use to spin yarn. Hope this helps.
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