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Dye Lots....
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Dec 13, 2011 23:47:01   #
SharonM
 
How important is it to match the dye lot when using the new synthetic yarns? I saw a bulky varigated yarn I'd love to use ... the store has plenty, but they aren't all the same dye lot. There isn't any noticeable difference in the color of the skeins, but I'm concerned that there might be when it's knitted up. Is dye lot matching a concern any more?
 
Dec 13, 2011 23:49:47   #
Xiang (a regular here)
 
SharonM wrote:
How important is it to match the dye lot when using the new synthetic yarns? I saw a bulky varigated yarn I'd love to use ... the store has plenty, but they aren't all the same dye lot. There isn't any noticeable difference in the color of the skeins, but I'm concerned that there might be when it's knitted up. Is dye lot matching a concern any more?


It really depends on the look you want. With a single coloured yarn, the difference might be noticeable, but if you are knitting for yourself, & not for show or sale, the difference might not be noticeable. I always use yarn in the same dye lot for my projects
Dec 14, 2011 01:42:17   #
Dreamweaver
 
Well, it really depends. On a solid color, it can make a difference, but even that can be overcome by working with two different skeins and alternating rows to blend. Some acrylics even say NO DYE LOT and should match regardless. On a variegated, get close to some natural light to check... If you can't see a difference, go for it. Even if there is a slight difference, it will be barely noticeable, if at all. If it is a true hand-dyed... Absolutely get all the same dye lot. Hand dying can be miles apart from one batch to another....

With what you are looking at, I would definitely go for it...
Dec 14, 2011 06:15:35   #
SharonM
 
Thanks so much for your help! :-)
Dec 14, 2011 06:57:02   #
casey1952
 
I used a varigated, sybthetic to make a baby blanket. Discovered after it was done that one skein was from a different dye lot. Right in the middle the colorways changed. The groupings were shorter than the rest of the skeins.
Dec 14, 2011 07:01:44   #
JoyceinNC
 
With the modern techniques in blending dyes, dye lot doesn't seem to be much of a problem for any of the yarns available. BUT- if the label says to buy enough of the same dye lot for your project, you'll be sorry if you don't. I had trouble with Lion Brand "Homespun". Didn't notice the difference until the piece was completed. Disaster. So take the advice on the label! Even the "no dye lot" yarns can be a problem if you buy yarn now to match the same yarn brand and color that you bought a couple of years ago. If you can't help having different dye lots, then plan on using the yarn in color blocking or fair isle style. Then, if there is a difference, you won't be disappointed and everyone will think you are a very creative designer!

P.S. Casey 1952- I've had the same thing happen!
 
Dec 14, 2011 09:22:39   #
Marylou12 (a regular here)
 
I have found it makes a big difference ....especially when dealing with solid colors. If you found that one of your skeins is a different dye lot, and you can't exchange it for the correct one, you alternate rows with the other yarn to blend it in so it doesn't show so much.
Always try to get plenty of the original color, maybe purchase 1 skein over if you're not sure of the amount needed or if it's exact so that you don't have to run out later and most likely get a different dye lot by then.
If you'd rather not deal with them you can always stick with "No Dye Lot" skeins. It would be written on the wrapper.
Dec 14, 2011 14:45:29   #
Betty White
 
It made a big difference with me, using hand dyed yarn from Classic Elite for socks. It was my fault for not checking the dye lot, but I didn't think it was that important. YES, it is.


SharonM wrote:
How important is it to match the dye lot when using the new synthetic yarns? I saw a bulky varigated yarn I'd love to use ... the store has plenty, but they aren't all the same dye lot. There isn't any noticeable difference in the color of the skeins, but I'm concerned that there might be when it's knitted up. Is dye lot matching a concern any more?
Dec 14, 2011 15:15:21   #
SharonM
 
Thanks for all of the input. Although I knew that with hand dyed and specialty yarns, matching dye lots is an absolute... I wasn't sure about the newer, synthetic yarns. Based on everyone's experience, it seems I should stick with tried and true... make sure the dye lots match! I sure do appreciate all the advice :)
Dec 14, 2011 16:53:47   #
dachsmom (a regular here)
 
I always alternate between two skeins every other row if I use different dye lots. Sometimes even though you can't tell by looking the colors will be slightly different when knitted.
Dec 14, 2011 17:04:32   #
knitterbee
 
There can seem to be no difference in the store, then in different light, there is a noticeable difference. If you can't get the same dye lot, alternating as stated above can work well (even alternating 3 different dye lots if it is a large project). I often see more difference in the variegated than the solid colors.

No Dye Lot does not mean they are the same! It means they don't care enough to put a dye lot on the wrapper. I have noticed that Red Heart has a date in the area where there used to be a dye lot. I try to make sure they are the same, since they tell you when they were done.

Unfortunately, store light is not the same as natural light and things often look different when you get it home.
 
Dec 14, 2011 19:17:54   #
Lilysmom567
 
One of my pet peeves on this subject is going into Michaels or Joanns for a specific yarn...could be Red Heart, Bernat, doesn't seem to matter...I'm in the market for 6 skeins. They have plenty of the color I want but there are no more than two each of many different dye lots! I have asked the store manager about this, and was told "that is how our shipment comes in". Grrrrrr....
Dec 14, 2011 19:41:10   #
SharonM
 
@ Lilysmom567... the same thing happens to me here in NC. Also at my local WalMart. Now I don't expect much from WalMart, although they do have some really pretty yarns... but you'd think the stores that specialize in this stuff would be a little more particular with what they accept for stock. Guess it's just another example of the "it's not my job" syndrome! I'll second that "grrrr" !!!
Dec 14, 2011 21:20:03   #
wilbo
 
You can tell the difference when knitted up (even verigated). What you can do (I have done this on scarves) is take three skeins and alternate by rows. When you get to end of first row attach a second, the end of second row attach third. Pick up the other thread when you reach each end of row. All will look the same throughout this way. Also, no wasted balls of yarn because additional purchases don't match by dye lot.

A thing you can do to respect other crafters is to choose an odd skein if you only need one for say a scarf. Leave the ones that match exactly for those with larger projects. It's a nice thing to do.
May 5, 2013 08:16:51   #
Catarry
 
SharonM wrote:
@ Lilysmom567... the same thing happens to me here in NC. Also at my local WalMart. Now I don't expect much from WalMart, although they do have some really pretty yarns... but you'd think the stores that specialize in this stuff would be a little more particular with what they accept for stock. Guess it's just another example of the "it's not my job" syndrome! I'll second that "grrrr" !!!


Keeping prices at 'bargain' levels requires minute economies in how stores stock their shelves.
I know, for instance, that stores do not carry inventory or 'overstock' as we may imagine: a big back room with boxes of additional items.. Instead, stock is stored at a central warehouse and delivered weekly, usually in batches of about 8-12 skeins of a given brand, line and color.
Tracking is done by the registers, which are connected to a corporate computer. When the skeins you buy are scanned for price at the register, they are flagged as sold at the mainframe. Then, eventually, that info is sent to the warehouse and an appropriate shipment is dispatched back to the store to replace the items sold.
So if three people buy 2 skeins out of a shipment of 8, you may find only the 2 remaining skeins until those are sold and an order goes out to replace 'em.
There is simply no way to insure that you'll find sufficient skeins in a single dye lot at a chain store, where you're shopping for convenience and for price.
If you're not shopping for natural yarns at an LYS, then your best bet is to either special order at the store (and I'll bet you'll be told that they can't guarantee dye lot on special orders: if the person assisting you even knows what a dye lot is) or to go to the manufacturer's site and order on-line direct from the maker, where you'll have a better chance at being understood and where you'll have recourse if you get a scrambled dye lot.
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