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Doubling yarn
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Dec 9, 2017 08:25:57   #
deeonhill
 
My daughter has picked out a beautiful cowl pattern and yarn she fell in love with. Unfortunately, the cowl calls for DK yarn and the yarn she's bought is a sock yarn. If I double the sock yarn, will I get a DK weight?
 
Dec 9, 2017 08:32:41   #
Peggy Beryl
 
Probably quite close. A gauge swatch is still needed to check out the combination of this particular yarn, needle, and your personal knitting tension to be sure.
Dec 9, 2017 08:33:39   #
silvercharms
 
Yes, that's what I do. Doubling up as far as I can tell works right down the line...e.g. double aran-weight for bulky and double bulky for super bulky. But some dks are thinner than others, just be careful. Shouldn't matter too much with a cowl, though.
Dec 9, 2017 08:34:19   #
lexiemae (a regular here)
 
Yes do a swatch, you may just need to alter the needle size . Good luck :o)
Dec 9, 2017 08:34:20   #
mrskowalski (a regular here)
 
Not quite positive. I am doubling for a cardigan (cuz it's very cold here).Cascade Heritage (sock yarn)
5.5 st=1inch.on size 4 needles.
It will be plenty warm and you might want to swatch for gauge.
Best of luck.
Dec 9, 2017 08:45:48   #
knit4ES (a regular here)
 
As others have said.... it will probably work .... but be aware that you will need more yarn
If the pattern calls for 250 yards of DK you will probably need twice that much of the sock yarn
 
Dec 9, 2017 09:53:44   #
RoxyCatlady (a regular here)
 
It should. That is where the "double" in dk (double knitting) came from - doubling up on fingering weight yarn.

(but, watch the yardage - you might need more of the sock yarn she brought to have enough for double strand!! And, remember, the point is to let the two strands wind together as if they'd been plied together, so don't keep untwisting them while you knit)
Dec 9, 2017 10:58:57   #
deeonhill
 
Thank you for all the prompt replies! I appreciate the advice and she did buy double the yarn - at $26 a skein!
Dec 10, 2017 09:01:57   #
SANDY I (a regular here)
 
Oooh how soft it will be on her. Let us know what it turns out.
Dec 10, 2017 09:23:45   #
betty boivin (a regular here)
 
Post when finished... sure it will be great!
Dec 10, 2017 10:54:05   #
wray
 
Do a swatch to see how it knits. For that price I'd be sure, don't know what pattern you are using, but have you thought to use the fingerling weight and see how it drapes, might be a delicate softer look..
 
Dec 10, 2017 12:54:04   #
sockyarn
 
do a swatch to fined out.
Dec 10, 2017 15:13:39   #
MclareB
 
I’m not sure what the initials “dk” mean. Please enlighten me. Thanks in advance!
Dec 10, 2017 15:20:20   #
IndigoSpinner (a regular here)
 
MclareB wrote:
I’m not sure what the initials “dk” mean. Please enlighten me. Thanks in advance!


DK stands for double knitting, and it means it's a yarn weight slightly lighter than worsted weight.

In my experience, two strands of fingering or sock weight will give you a worsted weight.

When you evaluate your swatch, get gauge, but also judge it for how it feels. If two strands of the yarn you have make it thicker than DK, you may be able to get gauge, but might produce a fabric that is stiff and not soft, which is what I'd want for a cowl.

You might be better off using a different gauge and compensating the number of stitches to make the right size, if any pattern in the cowl will make that practical.
Dec 10, 2017 18:44:18   #
Nanamel14 (a regular here)
 
I often hold 2 strands of sock yarn for other items....most of my staah is thinner yarns which I like to use.....I would try a swatch first to make sure you like the fabric for the item
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