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My first original sweater design
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Sep 12, 2018 15:37:09   #
sschimel
 
I've finished knitting my first original sweater design. Now, I'm in the process of writing it. So I'm looking for some input. I'm fully expecting to be inundated with responses.
1. When you read a pattern, what are the things that most annoy about patterns. For instance, is info you need left out because the author assumes you know it?

2. What things aren't usually included in patterns that you'd find helpful?

3. If patterns are written in multiple sizes, is it better to include all sizes in one pattern with other sizes in parentheses, or is it easier to read if only one size is included, with each size given its own pattern?


 
Sep 12, 2018 15:41:20   #
BARBIE-s
 
Nifty sweater.
1. Like to print out patterns in WORD program, not Adobe Acrobat
2. Just make it simple to understand
3. Sizes in parenthesis helpful .... so we can choose how many stitches per size, etc.

Thanks for listening and good luck with your pattern writing. (Charts not necessary)
Sep 12, 2018 15:50:28   #
Janec41
 
I find it easier to read a pattern with only one size written, but most of the crafters I know (including me) like the option to take out a much loved pattern and make it in a different size for another person without having to buy a new copy. These days most of us have access to photocopy equipment and we can make a copy and then mark the pertinent number of stitches with a highlighter to make it quick and easy to follow. If you get a good collection of answers, please post your results here so we can see what you find out.
Sep 12, 2018 15:51:56   #
bettyirene (a regular here)
 
I don't like charts either....and I like it written out that you can follow and knit all in one - not "sections of different patterns".......I love the job you have done on this jumper.....I think various sizes is great.
Sep 12, 2018 16:01:45   #
peanutpatty (a regular here)
 
Spectacular sweater! To write it out in multiple sizes you have a big job ahead of you.
I prefer multiple sizes, and the pattern stitches, with number of repeats at the beginning of the written pattern.
I also like charts, as long as they are not too complicated.

Good luck with this. I'm sure there are a lot of KPers who would love to have the pattern to this.
Sep 12, 2018 16:02:24   #
Norma
 
I, on the other hand prefer charts. If there are cables or a repeated lace section in the pattern it is easier to see it in a chart, for me anyway, and keep track of where I am. Like the sweater.
 
Sep 12, 2018 16:03:11   #
PharmDona
 
I love charts, although I have one (an early one) that is almost more trouble than it is worth. And was printed very small so I had to enlarge it - one more paper to add to the pattern. But mostly I love charts. I learned to use them when I was 77, so us old dogs can learn new tricks.
Sep 12, 2018 16:06:01   #
IndigoSpinner (a regular here)
 
BARBIE-s wrote:
Nifty sweater.
1. Like to print out patterns in WORD program, not Adobe Acrobat
2. Just make it simple to understand
3. Sizes in parenthesis helpful .... so we can choose how many stitches per size, etc.

Thanks for listening and good luck with your pattern writing. (Charts not necessary)


Trying to print out a pattern in Word can lead to it printing out with errors in it. PDF was created just to help fix the problems involved with trying to print out Word and other files. You're setting yourself up for problems and errors if you print in Word.
Sep 12, 2018 16:07:44   #
knit4ES (a regular here)
 
Like the look of that sweater.
I think it is wonderful that you are asking for input about these things.
It's probably a PITA for designers, but I like when there is a section that fully explains any abbreviations or acronyms that are used... even if they seem like widely used common ones.
Having that as a last page on the pattern is fine... then for folks that don't need it, they don't have to scroll past it.
I like when there is some information upfront about skills/stitches that are used.
As to the different sizes.... when it is a simple matter of stitches and rows the brackets/parenthesizes are fine
What gets hard to follow is multiple directions (" at the same time") that also involved differences based on the sizes.
I don't know if there is an easy way to address that.

Clear formatting is important... no fancy fonts, AT ALL. Spacing, rows set out separately (unless it is pretty simple: row 1 knit, row 2 purl)
There are patterns that I have pulled the text into an editing program and completely reformatted because the original presentation gave me a headache.
There are other patterns that I have been interested in but skipped when the formatting was too frustrating to even consider.

I prefer PDF's .... they are universal for whatever operating system or document management software people have.
Sep 12, 2018 16:21:01   #
IndigoSpinner (a regular here)
 
I just bought a book on writing knitting patterns, and it's worth its weight in gold.

https://smile.amazon.com/Beginners-Guide-Writing-Knitting-Patterns-ebook/dp/B01ENYMB6E/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1536783054&sr=1-2&keywords=writing+knitting+patterns

It really provides a checklist of what should go into a pattern. I can imagine some items would not be needed for some patterns, but this lists everything that should be in the most complicated patterns and shows you how they should be done.

I would highly recommend it if you're going to write a knitting pattern.

I've gotten so many patterns that were written by beginners, and had so much missing information. They read more like the notes the person made while they were knitting the pattern. They can design a pattern and knit it, but can't communicate well enough so that you can make the item from their pattern.

I've gotten so many patterns that call for X number of balls of a yarn that's been discontinued for the last ten years. They don't tell you what weight the yarn is, or how many yards are in a ball, and what to look for in a yarn that's suitable for the pattern. They're not a pattern, they're a research guide for you. And so on.

I just got this and haven't finished reading it, but scanning through it is an eye-opener.

If you want to publish an amateurish looking set of notes from when you made the project, that can be deciphered by an experienced knitter, fine. But if you want to start actually publishing patterns that newbies can read and understand, and that are clear, you really want this book.
Sep 12, 2018 16:30:30   #
blawler (a regular here)
 
You've already gotten some good advice so I'll just add that I think checking out that book is essential, especially if you intend to continue designing patterns. By the way, I like your first one. Aloha... Bev
 
Sep 12, 2018 16:30:48   #
aprilla (a regular here)
 
IndigoSpinner wrote:
Trying to print out a pattern in Word can lead to it printing out with errors in it. PDF was created just to help fix the problems involved with trying to print out Word and other files. You're setting yourself up for problems and errors if you print in Word.


Agree 100%. If produced in Word then those without the program may not be able to open it. Worse, producing the pattern in Word leaves it open to editing and perhaps edited versions being circulated (it happens). PDF files can be opened (for free) on any machine and is not easy to edit, also they scale so anyone needing enlarged print will have no issues. Better choice for publication.
Sep 12, 2018 16:32:19   #
sockit2me
 
Your design is very striking and unique......well done !

Good luck selling your pattern. I gave up selling patterns many years ago....just not worth the hassles that ensue.
Sep 12, 2018 16:36:49   #
Chocolatechips
 
Nice sweater! & good for you to undertake such. I have only 1 bug-a-boo most patterns leave out: after increases/decreases I want the resulting stitch count for each size showing. Yes! I could do the math, but I figure the designer already has, so print it in the pattern. Does this make any sense? For example, E. Zimmerman's patterns. Good luck!
Sep 12, 2018 16:39:47   #
Linda6885
 
Charts are definitely more useful. A schematic is essential. A list of stitches used with a good explanation.
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