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Is Knooking the same as Tunisian Crochet
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Jan 26, 2012 12:56:46   #
crafty lady UK
 
Someone asked if Knooking was the same or similar to Tunisian Crochet. I looked on U tube, as I couldn't remember how Knooking was done. It looks very interesting to do, and I found that the knit stitch and the purl stitch is done in a very similar way to the Tunisian knit and purl stitch. I wonder which one was the first out of the two. Was the knooking started first and copied by someone doing Tunisian crochet. Maybe someone has read the history somewhere and knows the answer. In which case, please do tell. I would love to know. Terri
 
Jan 26, 2012 13:44:05   #
Carol J.
 
The difference is, in tunisian crochet all the stitches remain on the hook and are taken off 2 by 2. With the knook, you work over a cord,then you take the cord out, and pull the hook through the stitches and the cord is back in the row of stitches. You work with a limp piece of work in your left hand and do the knitting or purling and start all over. In other words, the cord in knook is the key to success.
You can do work that looks like knitting with the afghan hook which is also called tunisian. Who knows which was here first, both have their place and workers.
Carol J.
Jan 27, 2012 10:19:40   #
judyr (a regular here)
 
I always thought using an afghan hook that it was crocheting and not knitting. I have made several afghans with the afghan hook (talk about mindless crafting) and they are so warm and so heavy. Work good with varigated yarn. Taught my daughter to do this and she went crazy making them.
Jan 27, 2012 11:42:53   #
Carol J.
 
There is a stitch you can do with the afghan hook that looks just like knitting. Work 2 rows of regular afghan stitch.
Row 1: Insert hook between the 2 double vertical threads from front to back and pull up a loop
Row 2: Work off same as regular afghan/tunisian crochet.
Yes, afghan stitch is crocheting but the Knook combines both crocheting and knitting.
Carol J.
Jan 27, 2012 11:55:46   #
lindahart
 
Yes and No. You can do Tunisian crochet with a knock, but it is designed to simulate knitting. In Tunisian crochet you use a long crochet hook to pull up loops across the row, then crochet them back, one by one, and so on, one row at a time. With the knook, you have open loops that you "knit" with the crochet end of the hook, one by one around and around, or back and forth, just as you would with knitting. Honestly, unless you have some physical disability or just want to try something different, it's just knitting, but slower. Frustratingly slower!!

The one big advantage would be if you didn't want to use double pointed needles or two circulars to knit a hat or socks. With the knock, you can do a small, circular piece of knitting with just the one hook, trailing it's "tail" behind.
Jan 23, 2016 18:39:19   #
Marny CA
 
Tunisian Crochet (Afghan Stitch) does not get turned.

Knooking, just like the loom used for knitting, takes too long, afaic.

If interested, give everything a try. You'll soon learn which is more to your liking.
 
Jan 23, 2016 21:39:54   #
disgo
 
As for your inquiry into its history they both were done at the same time after the guilds had to relinquish their grip over the craft. It was also the beginning of the industrial revolution where everything was open for "improvements". The Victorian pattern from a mill pamphlet had a knooked strped cardigan going from stockinette stripes I at first thought was done with pins. I later learned in the original form of knooking you used the knooks just like pins and from either end. A lady had a video that was produced not long ago in Australia where she did the two knook method and went so fast you could not see anything making beautiful stockinette. She mentioned something about turning the hook ends to make purl stitches while I was busy in my sample and did not get her web site and have never found it again. She had custom made pins that were longer then her forearms so she could rest the pin tips on the arm of her chair and used the knooks like a fulcrum so no strain at all like in knitting.

It was recently when the kits came out with the hole in the tip end where you double over a cord like sewing thread. If you have IC hooks and long cables there is no need for the cord and the cable is more easy to work stitches from as it acts then like the other knook being used at the same time. Just like in knitting you can even use more then one tool like DPNs.

Both in Tunisian and knook the stitches are created the same as one does in knitting. However like loom knitting there are far more options to create a knit and a purl (five knit stitches and six purls so far I have discovered in Tunisian/knooking) with the main difference you are drawing through a loop instead of picking it through.

Tunisian is right sided only so has a left side reverse return pass/chain to get you back to the right edge of your item. There are no purl stitches on the wrong side of the fabric but return chains that have an appearance of purl stitched fabric. In Tunisian the purl to the right side of the fabric is for pattern work only.

Knooking on the other hand can be done both flat and tubular just like in knitting. You just do not need another pin now and with my extra long cords I make with the cable to cable joiners you need no life lines or pattern markers either. Going in a coil fashion I have also done and in my comments to other posts call this "snailing" as you are creating the spiral like a snail shell is created. You can create the purls on the wrong side in flat so you get stockinette.

Just like in loom knitting the fabric may appear to be identical to pin created knit fabric but you need to stretch the fabric wide to see the "bights" are different. It is due to the pin allowing the yarn more freedom to move all its strands before being locked into the stitch below when you remove it from the left pin. In knooking there is no removing stitches created and the way the loop is drawn through by the hook makes different strands of the yarn get caught in the completed stitches. You need of course to do samples to see this happen.

Like anything new you need to practice as I can now almost go as fast as my knitting continental on cabled pins using my knook cable. I prefer the Denise for this since their cables are larger in diameter and hold the working loops much easier to work new stitches into them. When frogging in knooking you simply pull the hook out to the problem with no worry about loops falling of as they are still on the cable and just start from there again.

The same is not true with Tunisian as you will leave the loops free and need to get them back on. I learned from knooking that in Tunisian to remove the hook entirely and then run it through the loop strands of the row you made the mistake on up to the mistake and then unravel your work.
 
          
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