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Converting a cardigan pattern to be able to steek it
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Mar 1, 2012 00:33:09   #
Dace
 
I recently bought a cardigan pattern from the Vogue knitting site and was dismayed to find the pattern is done in pieces (back, left front, etc.) rather than in the round. This would force me to learn how to purl colorwork.

Has anyone on the forum converted a pattern to in the round with a steek to avoid having to purl colorwork? (As you can tell, I'm rather fond of the purl stitch, LOL) Any tips/advice would be greatly appreciated before I dive into this one...

Here's a picture of the pattern on their website:
http://store.vogueknitting.com/p-319-floral-jacket.aspx
 
Mar 1, 2012 01:09:03   #
Dreamweaver
 
Gorgeous. It looks like Kaffe's take on a classic Wm. Morris design. How I would love to make that.... I would have been surprised to see this pattern written in the round. You could certainly add a pattern repeat to make room for the steek and knit in the round up to the armholes. After that.... I think you have to do the front and back individually anyhow because the shape of the sleeve and placement is not the same as most steeked sweaters would appear. Then again, I don't mind purling for colorwork and I hate cutting into my hand knit or handwoven fabric.... Just a big chicken at heart.
Mar 1, 2012 08:27:36   #
Carol J.
 
Look up steeking and when you find how much work it is when you have the piece done, you will wish you had purled the pieces and sewed them together.
Norwegian sweaters are made in the round, extra stitches added between the fronts and at the armholes. Then you sew with the sewing machine a couple times down the fronts, in the extra stitches on both sides and cut them apart. At the armholes you do the same. The front bands are knitted separately and you have to add 4 stitches as a facing to cover the cut edges and sew the bands on. Same is done for the sleeves, when long enough you add an inch of stockinette stitch to cover the cut edges and sew a seam as well as the facing down.
I have done this many times but the first time was traumatic.

Carol J.
Mar 1, 2012 13:03:50   #
Dace
 
Thank you for your thoughts -- I've not steeked before, but am somewhat comfortable with the idea. I guess I look at it as woven fabric where you either pink or zig-zag stitch the edges to keep it from unraveling.

Sigh. I figured I'd have to do a bit of purling to do the armholes/shoulders. Will have to cast on one of the front sides and play a bit. I'm just worried I'll screw up and carry the thread on the wrong side in a spot, and only discover that I did several rows later. :D
Mar 1, 2012 14:57:58   #
Carol J.
 
i use a magnet board when doing chart work. You soon get usd to reading the chart one way for knit and one way for purl, some designs often repeat the row before. I did not look closer at the sweater you have chosen to make, but it is a beautiful sweater. If the armholes are shaped, I don't thing a steek will help you there. Norwegian sweaters have dropped shoulder with no shaping for armhole or sleeves.
Try the design on a smaller piece, you may find it is not as difficult as you think. The trick when carrying colors is not to carry the unused yarn too tight or too loose. Practice knitting and purling with colors, using your pattern with other yarn.
I sewed small straight stitches down each side of the center steek stitches, which were usually 4 and done in a solid color, added on between the two fronts, I carried the other colors across that area and did two or three rows of sewing machine stitches, not zig zag and I did not use a pinking shears, you have to catch every piece of yarn to make it stable for sewing on the bands and covering the raw edges with the facing.

Carol J.
Mar 2, 2012 06:30:35   #
lindakaren12
 
Beautiful. What's a steek?
 
Mar 2, 2012 06:49:38   #
eggplantlady
 
STEEK IT! It is easy peasy. I just learned steeking by making a vest from Cheryl Oberle's Folk Vest book. The cutting isn't scarey at all as you use machine stitched rows to prevent unraveling. I doubt I will ever go back to knitting in 'pieces' again!
Mar 2, 2012 06:57:14   #
Carol J.
 
A steek can be some extra stitches or a long piece of yarn between two sections of a garment. When knitting in the round, you can yarn over several times to make the steek or you can add 4 or 5 stitches and knit them plain between the fronts or the armholes. You sew with the sewing machine on the outer edge of the cast on stitches with a fine stitch and several times in a U shape and cut in between the sewed stitches and attach a sleeve. This seam can be done by hand or sewing machine. The sleeve has been made the proper length but extra rows added for a facing, that covers the cut edges of the sweater.
If you use the long threads between sections, you sew with the machine next to the knitting and then cut down the center of the long threads.
The center bands are knit to fit the fronts and a facing of several stitches added so when you sew the bands on the extra yarn ends and sewing machine stitching is hidden. You use the stitches of the band along with the neckline and finish your sweater or garment.
This is done on Norwegian knitting all the time.
You can type steek into Google and you might find another explanation.
Personally I add the extra stitches when I do Norwegian sweaters but I have seen the long threads used in patterns too and tried it.
With knitting in the round you always see your design on the right side.

Carol J.
Mar 2, 2012 07:08:27   #
Northernrobin
 
lindakaren12 wrote:
Beautiful. What's a steek?

A steek is a way to make up a sweater in the round and turn it into a cardigan...you add, maybe 8 stitches where the front band will be, and where the sleeves will be joined ( depending on the pattern..if its carefully shaped around the sleeves this will not work..but if its a dropped shoulder you are in business)..then you knit in the round all the way up, without interruption..:-), til the neck shaping or shoulder. afterwards you baste with a thread exactly where you want to cut...sew it up with a sewing machine with very short tight stitches...and go over it enough times to be comfortable..the then you CUT with a scissors. after that you add your band for the buttons..and smile at your cleverness in avoiding back and forth knitting and all of the sew ups. There are some added tricks...you can use a crochet hook and put in a false seam along the sides..this actually is for a purpose to help shaping and avoid sagging.

Then you knit up the sleeves in the round or you can start them at the sleeve "hole" and knit down..

that is the general idea. you can find more directions in "Knitting in the old way" by Priscilla A. Gibson-Roberts. This is also discussed by the Queen of knitting..Elizabeth Zimmerman...whose books ought to be in the library of every ambitions knitter. While you are at it..add the 4 volumes of Barbara G. Walker's knitting treasuries and you are set for a lifetime of knitting..your way.
Mar 2, 2012 08:57:24   #
joanh8060
 
Northernrobin wrote:
lindakaren12 wrote:
Beautiful. What's a steek?

A steek is a way to make up a sweater in the round and turn it into a cardigan...you add, maybe 8 stitches where the front band will be, and where the sleeves will be joined ( depending on the pattern..if its carefully shaped around the sleeves this will not work..but if its a dropped shoulder you are in business)..then you knit in the round all the way up, without interruption..:-), til the neck shaping or shoulder. afterwards you baste with a thread exactly where you want to cut...sew it up with a sewing machine with very short tight stitches...and go over it enough times to be comfortable..the then you CUT with a scissors. after that you add your band for the buttons..and smile at your cleverness in avoiding back and forth knitting and all of the sew ups. There are some added tricks...you can use a crochet hook and put in a false seam along the sides..this actually is for a purpose to help shaping and avoid sagging.

Then you knit up the sleeves in the round or you can start them at the sleeve "hole" and knit down..

that is the general idea. you can find more directions in "Knitting in the old way" by Priscilla A. Gibson-Roberts. This is also discussed by the Queen of knitting..Elizabeth Zimmerman...whose books ought to be in the library of every ambitions knitter. While you are at it..add the 4 volumes of Barbara G. Walker's knitting treasuries and you are set for a lifetime of knitting..your way.
quote=lindakaren12 Beautiful. What's a steek? /qu... (show quote)

Ahh! another elizabeth Zimmerman "appreciator". I laughed out loud thee first time i read her directions for a "Stek"...which ended with" Now go lay down with a cool washcloth on your forehead and contemplate what you have done". Cutting through your color patternedknit fabric is cause to contemplate. Joan 8060
Mar 2, 2012 09:05:31   #
zeda
 
I did this with a vogue pattern about a year ago. It was my first time to steek. It was daunting to begin with but I just took the pattern and very slowly refigured the two fronts and back into one piece then I added about 10 or 12 stitches between the two fronts for the steek. It was only confusing to start with. Once I got going it was super easy. Scary cutting the steek but it worked like a charm.
 
Mar 2, 2012 09:31:29   #
dogorman53
 
However you decide to do it be certain to 'send' us all a photo of the finished garment. It is stunning.
Mar 2, 2012 15:10:49   #
mernie
 
Am I missing something? Would it not be difficult to knit intarsia in the round?
Mar 2, 2012 15:51:26   #
Dornar
 
About three hours ago I posted these pictures of some sleeves on DPNs and the steeking I am doing on a sweater.

http://www.knittingparadise.com/t-65035-1.html

Hope this little peek at the process shows you it is not so hard, once you get your courage up.
Mar 3, 2012 01:38:36   #
Dace
 
Dornar wrote:
About three hours ago I posted these pictures of some sleeves on DPNs and the steeking I am doing on a sweater.

http://www.knittingparadise.com/t-65035-1.html

Hope this little peek at the process shows you it is not so hard, once you get your courage up.


That's some gorgeous work there!
 
          
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