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Yarn substitute help
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Mar 22, 2012 09:11:50   #
ccharlay1
 
I am new to crochet and I'm about to tackle my first pair of Mary Jane Booties. The yarn on the pattern is Caron Simply Soft. Can anyone tell me the equivalent please? DK or 4 ply?
 
Mar 22, 2012 09:27:57   #
daralene
 
Don't know if this will help or not but I just learned that there is a labeling of yarn in a number. If you look on the Caron soft on the label above where the article and color are you will see a number on the left side. It is a "4". When you are looking for an interchangeable yarn, look for this "4" on the label.

http://www.craftyarncouncil.com/label.html


I can't get the symbols to show so if you go to the site above you can see the new symbols. Hopefully this will become the standard for all yarn companies all over the world and it will be so much easier for us to find interchangeable yarns.

Symbols will be introduced to designate the various weights (thicknesses) of yarn on labels and to designate the skill level (beginner to experienced) of a pattern.

For yarn weighs a ball/skein will be used containing a number between 0–6, with 0 the finest and 6 the thickest. Downloadable yarn label and skill level symbols.

The skill level symbol is a horizontal bar divided into four sections.When one section of the bar is shaded, it indicates a beginner pattern; four shaded sections indicate a pattern for experienced knitters or crocheters.

Below is how you can expect to see the new yarn symbols used on a label; and how the yarn and skill level symbols might appear in a pattern. See Standard Yarn Weight System and Skill Levels for more information about what the new symbols will represent. As noted in the introduction, these changes will be implemented over time with the printing of new labeling and the publishing of new books, patterns and magazines.
Mar 22, 2012 09:30:57   #
ccharlay1
 
The chart that I have states that Worsted weight is DK. Now I'm confused LOL The pattern doesnt show the label either sorry, but many thanks for your help.

daralene wrote:
Don't know if this will help or not but I just learned that there is a labeling of yarn in a number. If you look on the Caron soft on the label above where the article and color are you will see a number on the left side. It is a "4". When you are looking for an interchangeable yarn, look for this "4" on the label. .

I believe the 4 is for worsted and the 3 is dk. I will see if I can find a chart for this for you.
Mar 22, 2012 09:40:38   #
daralene
 
It may be different in the US. Here is what it says for the US.
According to the Craft Yarn Council of America, DK yarn averages a knit gauge range (4 inches, or 10 centimeters, in stockinette stitch) of 21 to 24 inches on U.S. needles 5 to 7 (3.75 to 4.5 millimeters). DK yarn also is in the same category as light worsted. A pattern that calls for a light worsted yarn also can use DK yarn. The substitution should have little effect on the piece's size, but always check your gauge to be sure.

Significance
The slight difference in weight between DK yarn and worsted and sport weight yarns allows for a simple substitution into a project that calls for worsted or sport yarn (and the other types of yarns that fall into those categories). If you're creating a piece that calls for worsted weight yarn, but you want it to be lighter, use DK yarn. For a project using sport yarn, using DK yarn will make the piece a little heavier. Either way, know your gauge so you can adjust the stitch count and stay within the finished size of the piece.

Function
DK yarn is best used for projects that require a lighter weight yarn such as lightweight sweaters, hats and accessories, and children's items.

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Mar 22, 2012 09:51:55   #
ccharlay1
 
Thank you so much Daralene - WOW you are a mine of information LOL. Been a great help thanks :)



daralene wrote:
It may be different in the US. Here is what it says for the US.
According to the Craft Yarn Council of America, DK yarn averages a knit gauge range (4 inches, or 10 centimeters, in stockinette stitch) of 21 to 24 inches on U.S. needles 5 to 7 (3.75 to 4.5 millimeters). DK yarn also is in the same category as light worsted. A pattern that calls for a light worsted yarn also can use DK yarn. The substitution should have little effect on the piece's size, but always check your gauge to be sure.

Significance
The slight difference in weight between DK yarn and worsted and sport weight yarns allows for a simple substitution into a project that calls for worsted or sport yarn (and the other types of yarns that fall into those categories). If you're creating a piece that calls for worsted weight yarn, but you want it to be lighter, use DK yarn. For a project using sport yarn, using DK yarn will make the piece a little heavier. Either way, know your gauge so you can adjust the stitch count and stay within the finished size of the piece.

Function
DK yarn is best used for projects that require a lighter weight yarn such as lightweight sweaters, hats and accessories, and children's items.

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Free Embroidery Designswww.emblibrary.com
Embroidery Library offers new free designs each month. Download today!
"Free Knitting Patterns:"KnittingParadise.com
Lots of free patterns and pictures like you've never seen before.
Madelinetosh yarnwww.centerstreetknits.com
Save 15% on Tosh Sock, Vintage & DK. Free gift with order.
Free Embroidery Designsembroiderydk.com/Embroidery_Designs
We have 12.000 Embroidery designs. Join for 6$. Download online now!
Related Searches:
Knitting Needles
Baby Knitting Patterns
Hand Knitting Patterns
Cotton Yarn
Knitting Yarn
Resources
CYCA Standard Yarn Weight System


Read more: What Is Double Weight Knitting Yarn? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5096016_double-weight-knitting-yarn.html#ixzz1pqvjt0Qu
It may be different in the US. Here is what it sa... (show quote)
Mar 22, 2012 12:45:01   #
daralene
 
Hope the link I gave helps. If you find a yarn with the same number 4 on it, this should work. If not, go to a yarn store and they will help you. I know all yarns don't yet have the number on them but they are working on it. They are hoping it will become the standard so we can interchange yarns easily.
 
Mar 23, 2012 11:21:21   #
ninabeanbag
 
Google yarn equivalent.... lots of sites showing yardage, weight, type etc........
Mar 23, 2012 11:22:26   #
ninabeanbag
 
or try the site yardex.........
Mar 23, 2012 11:37:57   #
katrinka
 
Go by gauge. I believe a true worsted weight yarn is approximately 10 single crochet = 4" (10cm) on size J/10 hook.
Good luck w/booties,
kat
Mar 23, 2012 14:16:50   #
killashandra
 
SS is a 4 for 4 ply but it is slightly smaller than the usual knitting worsted. Some 3 wool blends are closer to the same size than knitting worsted like red heart etc. You will need to take the stitches per inch and compare that to the other yarns. Sometimes needle size can help but always check your gauge when substituting.
Mar 23, 2012 18:48:14   #
katrinka
 
Okee dokey. I found a list of Caron Simply Soft products on ravelry.com. Maybe you can use this link to determine gauge & compare to the yarn you are using, for which you can find the pertinent info:
http://www.ravelry.com/yarns/search#page=1&view=thumblist&query=caron%20simply%20soft&sort=best
Good luck,
kat
 
Mar 23, 2012 19:20:11   #
Deb55
 
Any DK or 4ply should work as long as the weight is 4 since that is what the Simply Soft is.
Does the pattern you are crocheting give you a stitch gauge you can work up a swatch with the yarn you are using to match the gauge.
Sep 19, 2016 06:24:28   #
Kim Pracy
 
I have just googled this yarn for ply as well, & it is 4ply on 1 site, 10 ply on Ravelry & DK on another??? Talk about confusing...
Sep 19, 2016 08:46:54   #
RoxyCatlady (a regular here)
 
Kim Pracy wrote:
I have just googled this yarn for ply as well, & it is 4ply on 1 site, 10 ply on Ravelry & DK on another??? Talk about confusing...


Because in the US, "4 ply" was used to refer to worsted weight acrylic yarns that were made up of 4 plies. "4ply" yarn is used more often in Australia, Canada, and the UK to refer to thinner baby or fingering weight yarns. Due to that bit of confusion, now that the world is so much smaller thanks to the internet, someone decided to go with a numbering system for the US. Unfortunately, there is much variation in the numbering system - a class 4 yarn can be as thin as a dk or 8ply yarn, or nearly as thick as an aran or 12ply yarn!

Basically, there is no easy or universal system that really works. It will get you in the right ball park, or close to what you need, but there is no substitute for swatching to match the intended gauge to achieve the correct size/fabric drape.
Sep 19, 2016 12:30:06   #
Kim Pracy
 
It is just such a headache with us having different terms. Even with the stitches. All I can say is, "Thank Heavens for google." Thanks so much for your input Roxy. Sooner or later they will all come together hopefully. 😉
 
          
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