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converting a sweater pattern to seamless
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Apr 14, 2012 11:37:21   #
bizzyknitter
 
When I finish knitting a sweater I really dislike to sew the seams. Is there a video on how I can convert a sweater pattern to knitting without sewing the seams?
Thanks. :?
 
Apr 15, 2012 06:14:04   #
cydneyjo
 
Decrease the number of stitches you cast on by one on each side (four stitches altogether) and knit in the round. You won't need the selvage stitches because you won't be sewing the seam. When you get to the armhole shaping, remember that you are already a stitch short when doing the initial bind-off.
Apr 15, 2012 10:20:34   #
bizzyknitter
 
cydneyjo wrote:
Decrease the number of stitches you cast on by one on each side (four stitches altogether) and knit in the round. You won't need the selvage stitches because you won't be sewing the seam. When you get to the armhole shaping, remember that you are already a stitch short when doing the initial bind-off.


Thank you so much :thumbup:
Apr 15, 2012 12:24:09   #
cd4player
 
Wow - I like that idea! I'm getting ready to knit a lace cardi for myself (for my son's wedding) and it's seamed. I'll give this a try!
Apr 15, 2012 12:40:51   #
Vique
 
I like this idea. I am one of the knitters who hates to seam. I think it is because I am never happy with the way my seams look they just don't look professional to me.
Apr 15, 2012 17:04:33   #
killashandra
 
also, when you get to the shoulder seams keep them all open and then use a three needle bind off to join them and then you won't have to seam them either and they will look fabulous!
The only issue I have run into switching from flat knitting to knitting in the round is when a pattern is intricate and needs to be worked with from front and back. In the round you only deal with the one side of the knitting, usually the front so K can become P and P can become K and patterns can become very complicated to deal with.
 
Apr 15, 2012 17:30:10   #
MaryMargaret
 
I liked my side seems much better once I learned how to do mattress stich from a You Tube video. Wasn't hard once I caught onto it, fun, in fact, and the seams become practically invisible, much more professional-looking than my old "running stitch" method.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvAS-HCWk9I

Some people knit their sweaters in the round up to the armholes then back and forth the rest of the way. Examples of this have looked good to me. But one LYS owner told me she doesn't do this because her tension is so much different in knit-only than in back-and-forth knit and purl that it shows in the fabric. Something you wouldn't know until you tried it.
Apr 15, 2012 20:41:34   #
killashandra
 
MaryMargaret wrote:
I liked my side seems much better once I learned how to do mattress stich from a You Tube video. Wasn't hard once I caught onto it, fun, in fact, and the seams become practically invisible, much more professional-looking than my old "running stitch" method.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvAS-HCWk9I

Some people knit their sweaters in the round up to the armholes then back and forth the rest of the way. Examples of this have looked good to me. But one LYS owner told me she doesn't do this because her tension is so much different in knit-only than in back-and-forth knit and purl that it shows in the fabric. Something you wouldn't know until you tried it.
I liked my side seems much better once I learned h... (show quote)


I hadn't thought of the tension difference possibility. Will have to keep that in mind since tension is one thing I frequently struggle with from one day to the next. Sometimes I have no trouble at all with it and other times.......grrrrrr. The last KAL I did I had a dooosey of a time getting my squares done in different stitches to come out even remotely close to the same size even when I redid a few of them numerous times.
thank you for the tid bit.
Apr 15, 2012 21:54:26   #
BEChristianson
 
MaryMargaret wrote:
I liked my side seems much better once I learned how to do mattress stich from a You Tube video. Wasn't hard once I caught onto it, fun, in fact, and the seams become practically invisible, much more professional-looking than my old "running stitch" method.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvAS-HCWk9I

Some people knit their sweaters in the round up to the armholes then back and forth the rest of the way. Examples of this have looked good to me. But one LYS owner told me she doesn't do this because her tension is so much different in knit-only than in back-and-forth knit and purl that it shows in the fabric. Something you wouldn't know until you tried it.
I liked my side seems much better once I learned h... (show quote)


Thank you so much for this linc. I always have trouble sewing up the seams.
Apr 15, 2012 23:33:53   #
MaryMargaret
 
BEChristiansen, you're welcome. I wish I had discovered it years ago!
Apr 16, 2012 11:23:22   #
bizzyknitter
 
cydneyjo wrote:
Decrease the number of stitches you cast on by one on each side (four stitches altogether) and knit in the round. You won't need the selvage stitches because you won't be sewing the seam. When you get to the armhole shaping, remember that you are already a stitch short when doing the initial bind-off.


I am definitely going to do this . I have a finished sweater sitting in my basket for months now needing to be sewed together but having a problem with the collar, once I get that done I will try my next sweater in the round. Thanks again. :thumbup:
 
Apr 16, 2012 18:58:48   #
joycevv (a regular here)
 
I would also suggest that you put markers to let you know where your front and back stitches are as you're knitting in the round. Some sweaters have shaping in the torso, waist decreases or whatever. While knitting in the round, you can easily make these decreases if you have markers.
Apr 17, 2012 14:20:41   #
bizzyknitter
 
joycevv wrote:
I would also suggest that you put markers to let you know where your front and back stitches are as you're knitting in the round. Some sweaters have shaping in the torso, waist decreases or whatever. While knitting in the round, you can easily make these decreases if you have markers.


Thanks will do
:thumbup:
 
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