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Main
Measuring knitting length
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May 3, 2012 09:27:01   #
showperson
 
How do you measure the length of your knitting? If the pattern tells to you knit until the fabric measure 10 inches from the cast on row, do measure from just under the needles, or do you measure from the top of the needles?
 
May 3, 2012 09:31:59   #
Barbara Ann
 
I put the line on the measuring tape directly on the needles. Right smack center.
May 3, 2012 09:37:02   #
DeeDeeF
 
I put the ruler edge on the needle, hold both in the air, give it a gentle shake and measure down to the point where they say to meansure; If it looks close enough, the guesstimate is to go onto the next step.
May 3, 2012 10:13:27   #
Linda6885 (a regular here)
 
The most acurate way to measure, is to lie your knitting flat and measure directly UNDER the needle. You haven't actually knitted the row on the needles, and if you hold your knitting in the air the weight can pull it down and distort the actual measurement.
May 3, 2012 10:31:40   #
Waterford Girl
 
I agree with Linda , one must lay the knitting flat, and then measure up to needle.
Happy knitting
May 3, 2012 17:35:04   #
Leonora
 
That's correct.

Linda6885 wrote:
The most acurate way to measure, is to lie your knitting flat and measure directly UNDER the needle. You haven't actually knitted the row on the needles, and if you hold your knitting in the air the weight can pull it down and distort the actual measurement.
 
May 4, 2012 07:01:34   #
MGT
 
Beware, however, if you are determining length with a worsted or heavier garter stitch, because it stretches alarmingly! I know from experience. I've read (after the fact, of course) that in this situation it's a good idea to hang up the knitting, on the needles, by clothes-pinning it to a coat hanger and then run another needle through the bottom and weigh it down a little with something or other, leaving it for a few days to sort itself out. My sweater stretched out to be 4 inches longer, including the sleeves, even with agressive blocking. Twice. Ended up felting it a little and it's good now. Otherwise, yeah, measure up to the needle.
May 4, 2012 07:02:06   #
Caroline19
 
showperson wrote:
How do you measure the length of your knitting? If the pattern tells to you knit until the fabric measure 10 inches from the cast on row, do measure from just under the needles, or do you measure from the top of the needles?


I always measure from right under the needle. The important facture is that if you consistently measure everything from under the needle or if you prefer from the centre or top of the needle, then the measurement will be the same for each piece you are making. So pick the way you prefer and use it for all your measuring and if it is a hair under or over 10" it won't matter because the next piece will measure the same way. Have I confused you even further?
May 4, 2012 07:14:54   #
showperson
 
Thank you for your help everyone. I will measure from the same place, under the needle, consistently.
May 4, 2012 07:25:31   #
Aggie May
 
showperson wrote:
How do you measure the length of your knitting? If the pattern tells to you knit until the fabric measure 10 inches from the cast on row, do measure from just under the needles, or do you measure from the top of the needles?


A smidge out will not make any difference to the finished article because the minute you pick up your work, it will drop down anyway.
Just put the end of the measure close enough to the needle and you will be fine.
Remember, when working on a sleeve, measure on the seam, not on the straight otherwise your sleeve will be too long.
Have fun.
Colleen
May 4, 2012 09:37:40   #
maggie68
 
I always lay the garment on the table, then measure from the centre of the sts on the needle,,, and when knitting sleeves I always knit the 2 sleeves together, then mark off each row with either a row counter on the end of the needle, or on a piece of paper,,
 
May 4, 2012 11:55:35   #
Ronie (a regular here)
 
when I first started reading the newsletter here.. someone said..."NO YOUR LAP IS NOT A FLAT SURFACE TO MEASURE ON"..LOL meaning that if you think it is fine ... its not your measurement will not be correct and the correct way to measure is on a flat surface starting under the needle.. and thats how I do it every time.. even though the lap is more convienant...LOL you will need to find what works for you.. best of luck.. Ronie
May 4, 2012 12:16:54   #
deshka (a regular here)
 
I lay mine out on a pillow and smooth it very gently and then measure with a ruler from the bottom of the needle, only the stitches that have already been knit. My knitting does not usually reach past the length of a pillow because I usually knit baby sweaters and hats & booties. I do lots of fisherman knits and along with measuring i count the rows to see I have the gauge correct all through the item I am knitting. It works for me.
May 4, 2012 12:33:36   #
bennysmom
 
I agree with MGT about hanging the knitting, and with maggie68 about laying the knitting on a table. Knitting teachers have told me that you should put it on a slick surface. If you put it on cloth or other textured surface, the knitting will stay how you lay it. On a slick surface the knitting will assume its true size.
May 4, 2012 12:34:36   #
frostyfranny
 
The stitches on the needle account for another row so always measure from the top of the needle. Does it really matter as one row won't make that much difference anyway (o:
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