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May 30, 2011 17:44:43   #
grommitt
 
please can anyone tell me what this part of a pattern means
p2 { s2tog ] k1 { p2ssotog } it is just the part in brackets not quite sure off big thank you.
 
May 30, 2011 17:48:10   #
Altjem
 
grommitt wrote:
please can anyone tell me what this part of a pattern means
p2 { s2tog ] k1 { p2ssotog } it is just the part in brackets not quite sure off big thank you.


Purl 2, slip 2 stiches together, Knit 1, Pass 2 slipped stitches over together
May 30, 2011 17:52:13   #
TammyK
 
I think they just want you to slip 2 stitches together, knit 1, then pass the 2 slipped stitches over the knit stitch. The only question I would have is whether they want you to slip the 2 stitches together purlwise or knitwise. Are there any notes with the pattern that specify how to slip the 2 stitches together?
May 30, 2011 17:57:26   #
Altjem
 
Tammy, unless specified, you slip stitches knitwise, otherwise they don't sit properly. :)
May 30, 2011 18:54:16   #
TammyK
 
Altjem wrote:
Tammy, unless specified, you slip stitches knitwise, otherwise they don't sit properly. :)


I respectfully disagree. A single stitch is supposed to be slipped in such a way as to not alter the orientation of the stitch on the needle. It is purlwise unless otherwise instructed. Since we are dealing with 2 stitches slipped together in this case, it could be intended as a knitwise slip or a purlwise slip, which is why I asked if there were any extra notes or instructions in reference to slipping the 2 stitches. I don't want to assume to know what the pattern writer intends.
May 30, 2011 18:57:40   #
Dreamweaver
 
I was taught to slip purlwise unless instructed differently. This is certainly true in bead knitting.
 
May 30, 2011 23:36:07   #
deemail
 
Dreamweaver wrote:
I was taught to slip purlwise unless instructed differently. This is certainly true in bead knitting.


:thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: dreamweaver and tammy are correct according to the people at Lion Brand Yarn, in their help section...

Sometimes stitches are slipped without working from the right needle to the left needle. They can either be slipped purlwise or knitwise. If you are asked to slip stiches and the instructions don't specify which way, slip the stitch or stitches purlwise.

Slipping Stitches Purlwise

Insert the right needle (from back to front) into the next stitch on the left needle and place it on the right needle without working it.

Slipping Stitches Knitwise

Insert the right needle into the next stitch on the left needle as shown and place it on the right needle without working it. :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:
May 31, 2011 07:26:31   #
grommitt
 
BIG BIG BIG THANK YOU TO ALL OF YOU FOR ANSWERING MY QUESTION.
YOU HAVE ALL BEEN A GREAT HELP .
I DID GOOGLE IT & STILL DID NOT GET THE ANSWER .
THANK YOU GIRLS YOU DID ME PROUD X X X X X
May 31, 2011 16:32:00   #
CamillaDesertMouse
 
I agree with all 3 lol


deemail wrote:
Dreamweaver wrote:
I was taught to slip purlwise unless instructed differently. This is certainly true in bead knitting.


:thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: dreamweaver and tammy are correct according to the people at Lion Brand Yarn, in their help section...

Sometimes stitches are slipped without working from the right needle to the left needle. They can either be slipped purlwise or knitwise. If you are asked to slip stiches and the instructions don't specify which way, slip the stitch or stitches purlwise.

Slipping Stitches Purlwise

Insert the right needle (from back to front) into the next stitch on the left needle and place it on the right needle without working it.

Slipping Stitches Knitwise

Insert the right needle into the next stitch on the left needle as shown and place it on the right needle without working it. :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:
quote=Dreamweaver I was taught to slip purlwise u... (show quote)
May 31, 2011 16:36:03   #
StitchDesigner
 
In this case you are dealing with a double centered decrease. It is designed to look as though the center of a motif continues on top of the decreases. Like a leaf stem. In order to do this you MUST slip the 2 stitches together KNITWISE. This changes the orientation of the stitches, causing them to swap places. Very attractive when done correctly.
May 31, 2011 19:16:07   #
iris925
 
I agree with StichDesigner. I am currently knitting an afghan that has a very pronounced horizontal zig zag and every other change of direction is one of these slip 2's. It really is beautiful.
 
Jun 1, 2011 21:34:22   #
mjs
 
Altjem wrote:
Tammy, unless specified, you slip stitches knitwise, otherwise they don't sit properly. :)


No you do it purlwise for that reason.
Jun 2, 2011 07:30:53   #
knitwit4me
 
grommitt wrote:
please can anyone tell me what this part of a pattern means
p2 { s2tog ] k1 { p2ssotog } it is just the part in brackets not quite sure off big thank you.


Ithink it means purl2 (slip2tog) knit 1(purl2 slip sts over tog). Ihope this is right please let me know . Vron
Jun 2, 2011 07:37:20   #
Altjem
 
Ok, I figured out why I usually slip knitwise... I generally knit Russian Continental. Which means I knit in the back of the stitch to begin with, so I personally slip stitches knitwise... Using English (throwing), Traditional Continental or Combination Continental, you would slip the stitches purlwise. Sorry about the confusion
Jun 2, 2011 16:29:57   #
TammyK
 
Altjem wrote:
Ok, I figured out why I usually slip knitwise... I generally knit Russian Continental. Which means I knit in the back of the stitch to begin with, so I personally slip stitches knitwise... Using English (throwing), Traditional Continental or Combination Continental, you would slip the stitches purlwise. Sorry about the confusion


I wondered if that was the case, but I didn't want to ask and risk adding more confusion for anybody that isn't aware of the existance of other knitting styles/methods. We were all saying the same thing, just speaking 2 different languages. :)
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