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Need advice for best way to add a backing to hand embroidered crib quilt
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Jan 27, 2014 11:04:28   #
annalee15
 
I need ideas for the best way to add a backing to a hand embroidered crib quilt. it is now finished, but my daughter does not want the threads showing in the back.

has anyone on this forum done this before with good results? my last thought is fusing and even that i am not sure i will be happy with this method.
 
Jan 27, 2014 11:08:58   #
chickkie (a regular here)
 
I don't think there is any way to do it without some of the quilting showing on the back of the blanket. Even fusing probably wouldn't last through many washings.
Jan 27, 2014 11:09:19   #
Dcsmith77
 
IF I had to do this, I would cut a light fabric about 1/2 inch larger than the quilt and press a 1/2 seam allowance all around. Pin carefully being sure not to stretch either piece and whip stitch around. I would do it on the dining room table so that it would lie flat while I was working on it. If you have a serger and are good at using it, you could probably serge it together, but I believe hand sewing would be neater. Make the stitches very small so they are less likely to show. Good luck with this, and next time hide the ends. I'm sure this is demonstrated on some video on Youtube. You can hide those ends and don't wander from line to line. Break it off. Your embroidery should look just about as good on the wrong side as on the right side. I'm sure it is beautiful - how about a picture?
Jan 27, 2014 11:10:58   #
Dot Smith
 
I would think your quilt would definitely need a backing. I'd go to a nearby fabric shop with your quilt and go to the baby fabrics. I've used cotton fabrics and chenille fabrics for backings. Then to quilt the 2 layers together, I use my button stitch on my sewing machine. Using white thread this small back and forth stitch won't distract from the design. Good luck on finishing your quilt back. She'll love it when you're finished.
Jan 27, 2014 11:27:28   #
Carole Jeanne
 
Most/many churches have quilter groups that meet weekly. Ours meets twice weekly and every church in our town has quilters. They will have suggestions and methods for various results.

Members of our group incl me have done quilts by putting down a liner fabric then quilt bstting then the top. This is most easily accomplished by stretching the back side using a quilting frame baby quilt size so it is all smooth and wrinkle free.

The best edge is accomplished by making a 3" wide bias binding--not a storebought one, from fabric that corresponds with the front design and matches the back, and sewing it on through all layers and turning the folded edge to the back where it is hand stitched. No raw edges anywhere.

Sometimes the back and binding are white but contrasting colors are pretty. Look at fabric shops and get 100% cotton only. Prewash before using n dry in dryer. Polyester holds its color better but is awful to hand quilt.

If this sounds like a lot of bother, ok but it produces the best result. Maybe that's why the good ones cost so much, but it would be a shame to ruin all that hand embroidery.
Jan 27, 2014 11:36:33   #
Carole Jeanne
 
Addendum: the quilting is SUPPOSED to show on the back.

Good Hand quilting today is 5-6 st per inch. In the 1800s the standards were higher as cotton batting bunched and lumped n moved if stitches weren't 8-10 per inch with rows less than an inch apart.

Our ancestors make us look like lazy pigs.
 
Jan 27, 2014 11:39:28   #
Nana89
 
Dcsmith77 wrote:
IF I had to do this, I would cut a light fabric about 1/2 inch larger than the quilt and press a 1/2 seam allowance all around. Pin carefully being sure not to stretch either piece and whip stitch around. I would do it on the dining room table so that it would lie flat while I was working on it. If you have a serger and are good at using it, you could probably serge it together, but I believe hand sewing would be neater. Make the stitches very small so they are less likely to show. Good luck with this, and next time hide the ends. I'm sure this is demonstrated on some video on Youtube. You can hide those ends and don't wander from line to line. Break it off. Your embroidery should look just about as good on the wrong side as on the right side. I'm sure it is beautiful - how about a picture?
IF I had to do this, I would cut a light fabric ab... (show quote)


Agree---get a quality quilting fabric--probably a color like is used on front--although I usually use a soft ecru color for backing--the front is the star...and hand sew around--it will not take long and the end result is so beautiful---Good Luck--pictures please--I also would tie it--no sense adding more stitches--tying makes it more like something a baby would use
Jan 27, 2014 11:45:01   #
NanBasKnit
 
Carole Jeanne wrote:
Addendum: the quilting is SUPPOSED to show on the back.

Good Hand quilting today is 5-6 st per inch. In the 1800s the standards were higher as cotton batting bunched and lumped n moved if stitches weren't 8-10 per inch with rows less than an inch apart.

Our ancestors make us look like lazy pigs.


How true! I have a gorgeous old quilt that makes me wonder, "How on earth did anyone make stitches this small?" When I think about quilting in teeny tiny stitches like that, I say to myself, "No way!"
Jan 27, 2014 11:47:41   #
Dcsmith77
 
G.S., it was called PRACTICE. Also, very short needles are used, but it seems like that makes it harder. I had to give up because I could do the small stitches, but I couldn't see them!
Jan 27, 2014 11:48:17   #
Carole Jeanne
 
Recognizing that she doesn't want to have stitches show on back, I would ask if she wants them on the front. If not, I might stretch the backing on a frame, add the layer of batting or a layer of flannel, and the top. If she rejects batting, just use flannel. Stretch the two-three layers , pin, and baste around on the seam line, and see with sewing machine. I still would want the bias binding.

Not using a machine stitched edge invites raveling ESP if machine washing and drying.
Jan 27, 2014 12:04:32   #
Nana89
 
Carole Jeanne wrote:
Recognizing that she doesn't want to have stitches show on back, I would ask if she wants them on the front. If not, I might stretch the backing on a frame, add the layer of batting or a layer of flannel, and the top. If she rejects batting, just use flannel. Stretch the two-three layers , pin, and baste around on the seam line, and see with sewing machine. I still would want the bias binding.

Not using a machine stitched edge invites raveling ESP if machine washing and drying.


if she turns under the edge--and hand sews-=-there is no raveling--I have quilts I made 40 years ago--not a ravel on any of them--I use a machine to piece, but if a whole cloth--the entire quilt is done by hand
 
Jan 27, 2014 12:08:50   #
annalee15
 
Dcsmith77 wrote:
IF I had to do this, I would cut a light fabric about 1/2 inch larger than the quilt and press a 1/2 seam allowance all around. Pin carefully being sure not to stretch either piece and whip stitch around. I would do it on the dining room table so that it would lie flat while I was working on it. If you have a serger and are good at using it, you could probably serge it together, but I believe hand sewing would be neater. Make the stitches very small so they are less likely to show. Good luck with this, and next time hide the ends. I'm sure this is demonstrated on some video on Youtube. You can hide those ends and don't wander from line to line. Break it off. Your embroidery should look just about as good on the wrong side as on the right side. I'm sure it is beautiful - how about a picture?
IF I had to do this, I would cut a light fabric ab... (show quote)


omg! i am in trouble. i do not bother to hide the ends and this crib quilt, i thought i was a real smartie, had lots and lots to work on. it took forever and my eyes just aren't up to this like years ago. i manage to hide some, but ....the back is a mess.

i started working on this before my grandson was born, took so long he is no longer in crib (going to be three). my daughter is expecting so i just had to finish, but am at a loss as to how i should cover the back.

now problem with the backing as u say to do, it will separate and not be tufted, unless i can handstitch very small thru bottom layer to attach them, if u follow what i mean? No serger here.... sooooo any more ideas are all welcome.
thank you,
Jan 27, 2014 12:33:31   #
Carole Jeanne
 
I cannot imagine that the quilter groups in your towns churches wouldn't have someone who could. Quilters are nice people--like KP-ers and gardeners and others. Call a few churches, ask church secretary for time quilters meet and get some help. It's worth a try.

This world is full of nice people.
Jan 27, 2014 12:34:27   #
Carole Jeanne
 
And I'm really sorry for your health problems. Hopefully they will improve greatly.
Jan 27, 2014 12:52:32   #
jmcret05 (a regular here)
 
An easy way to "quilt" your embroidered piece is to hand tie the backing to the front at about 4 to 6 inch intervals.

If you want a light weight blanket, just buy a piece of good quality flannel and preshrink before cutting. You will want to cut it one inch larger all around. This will be turned under and hand sewn to the edges. Then you can follow the instructions for hand tieing.

http://www.craftsy.com/blog/2013/10/how-to-hand-tie-a-quilt/

That is the easiest way to secure the backing (and hide the embroidery threads) to give a finished look.
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