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Nov 2, 2014 08:33:52   #
bowler
 
I am hoping to use up some or all of my odd balls of wool to knit an afghan. I plan to just knit garter stitch but I am unsure of how many stitches to cast on. Could I ask the kind and helpful ladies on KP to point me in the right direction?
The size would be big enough to use as a lap rug or sofa cover.

Many thanks.

Maggie
 
Nov 2, 2014 08:39:52   #
cc1945
 
I usually cast on between 120-150 depending on the thickness of the yarn.
A good way to judge is looking up some patterns and check the cast on.
Nov 2, 2014 08:41:32   #
yarndriver
 
I've used my "orphans" in mitered square afghans. It's easy, you join squares as you go, and the result is like a crazy quilt. Also, I use the yarn down to the very end sometimes joining a new color mid square.
Nov 2, 2014 09:45:13   #
Yarn Happy
 
yarndriver wrote:
I've used my "orphans" in mitered square afghans. It's easy, you join squares as you go, and the result is like a crazy quilt. Also, I use the yarn down to the very end sometimes joining a new color mid square.


I want to do this too, just doesn't seem to be enough time to make everything I want to make!
Nov 2, 2014 10:08:19   #
yarndriver
 
The best thing about mitered squares is you don't have to do it all at once. Mine sat in a basket (room decor) so I could add to it when more orphans appeared.
Nov 3, 2014 06:53:10   #
lenorehf
 
Do tell...How did you do that. I was thinking about just making a bunch of Grannie Squares but your idea sounds much more interesting.
 
Nov 3, 2014 07:22:54   #
fairfaxgirl
 
[quote1=lenorehf]Do tell...How did you do that. I was thinking about just making a bunch of Grannie Squares but your idea sounds much more interesting.[/quote]

I agree--hate joining all those granny squares! I'm interested in your technique too.
Nov 3, 2014 08:40:09   #
cathbeasle
 
yarndriver wrote:
I've used my "orphans" in mitered square afghans. It's easy, you join squares as you go, and the result is like a crazy quilt. Also, I use the yarn down to the very end sometimes joining a new color mid square.


:thumbup:
Nov 3, 2014 09:03:28   #
Dsynr (a regular here)
 
I just knit a square from the center out with the leftovers. When there aren't any more leftovers, the blanket is finished or I wait until I've got more leftovers.

By getting bigger as I go, the center-out square lets me add to the blanket until it's the size I want. 'Round and 'round I go....

A "Log Cabin" is knit almost the same way, from the center out and uses up scraps nicely.

The "Ten Stitch" blanket is also a good choice for using up scraps.....
Nov 3, 2014 09:34:16   #
disgo
 
bowler wrote:
I am hoping to use up some or all of my odd balls of wool to knit an afghan. I plan to just knit garter stitch but I am unsure of how many stitches to cast on. Could I ask the kind and helpful ladies on KP to point me in the right direction?
The size would be big enough to use as a lap rug or sofa cover.

Many thanks.

Maggie


I am neither kind, helpful or a lady :-o :shock: :lol: but having done more "scrappy" afghans than nice "normal" ones I can give you my experience.

You simply measure what you consider to be applicable in your situation--like measure the back of the sofa and then decide if you want it to drape over the back (keeps it in place better) and then the length as in your favorite blanket etc. Cast on the number of stitches you want in your width measurement (look at other pattern measurements to give you and estimate) if doing the lap throw in that direction, otherwise do more for the length worked vertically for that direction. You can always add a stitch at the end of the cast on or remove them later if there are too many.

You need a finished fabric that will hold up in your laundering method since there will be a myriad of ends to contend with. Garter being the most stretchy of all the yarn fabrics in both the horizontal and the vertical planes would not be the best idea for working in ends, leaning against it etc.

Next would be the fact you will need to do swatches of each yarn used (as long as you stay with the same sixe needle throughout) since that will vary your gauge and cause distortions I don't think you want showing on the back of a sofa.

Is your general d├ęcor of your home like you and what you want? Does "scrappy" apply to your personality and situation? Do you detest seaming? Are you one that needs to have the color complete one row? Do you have a good way to join/tie on/tie off that will not be felt when someone feels it against their back? Do you like making different stitch samples so you can show off your skills? Have you considered pillow covers instead?
Nov 3, 2014 09:50:31   #
Nilda muniz (a regular here)
 
I am knitting one using two yarns at a time and did a cast on of 147 stitches. I started to knit the border, an icord.
 
Nov 3, 2014 09:51:30   #
yarndriver
 
lenorehf wrote:
Do tell...How did you do that. I was thinking about just making a bunch of Grannie Squares but your idea sounds much more interesting.


You can either knit or crochet the mitered square. I knit the first square then cast on half the required stitches, pick up the other half from one side of the first square and finish square 2. Since an odd number of sttiches are needed for each square, I make one in the center of the 1st row. If this is as clear as mud, jump to Ravelry and look up patterns made with mitered squares. Have fun!
Nov 3, 2014 14:25:16   #
bowler
 
Well as expected I received so many answers to my afghan question and I would like to thank everyone who took the trouble to help me.
I think I might consider the mitred squares but will try it out first before I make up my mind.
Many thanks to all
Maggie
 
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