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Help with a hole in my sweater
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Oct 5, 2011 19:30:51   #
alegar75
 
I have finished another baby sweater and found that I have a hole in the back of the sweater. Looks like two stitches were dropped.

Does anyone have a You Tube tutorial they can recommend or any suggestion on how to fix the hole? A friend suggested I darn the hole as I would a sock?

Any help is greatly appreciated.
Thank you!
Aletar
 
Oct 5, 2011 19:46:32   #
e.ridenh
 
alegar75 wrote:
I have finished another baby sweater and found that I have a hole in the back of the sweater. Looks like two stitches were dropped.

Does anyone have a You Tube tutorial they can recommend or any suggestion on how to fix the hole? A friend suggested I darn the hole as I would a sock?

Any help is greatly appreciated.
Thank you!
Aletar

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I would pick them up with some of your yarn and stitch them down - hopefully invisible.

I'd UNPLY your existing yarn = if 4 fly, I'd unply 2 strands and get in there with a smaller needle - hopefully one with a dull tip.......work from the back, but view the front for success.

Without a pic to tell me 'WHERE' in the back and no pattern to tell me the PATTERN stitch itself, this is what I'd do - generally speaking, K?

I don't think there is a video on repair for FOs, but you could google:

Repair FO dropped stitch video
.....and take a gander.

You'd be surprised what you can do with the existing yarn.....

Depending on the WEIGHT of your yarn, you might consider just unplying one strant and DOUBLING it as in hand sewing (mending); I'd not knot, eithr but weave it in.

Let's say you're '''''''out of yarn''''''', take a matching color of sewing thread, double it, too (with a knot), and pick those stitches up that way and stitch in.

Once you get in there, you'll see the placement of where to put the thread stitches to be as invisible as possible.

Good luck, sweetie!!!

Donna Rae :thumbup:
Oct 5, 2011 19:58:41   #
alegar75
 
Thank you for your help. I agree a knot might make it a big mess.

My baby sweater is finished. I was ready to block when I noticed the hole right in the middle back. Checking reveals two stitches that look like they were dropped. The hole is about 1.5". It is a stocking stitch pattern on 4ply. I feel your suggestion of weaving in is a good one. I do have extra yarn to use. Just am not sure how to go about this so it won't unravel. I will google and see what comes up.

Thank you again.
Oct 6, 2011 02:41:40   #
Dreamweaver
 
Do you know how to repair a droped stitch with a crochet hook - just walking the dropped stitches up the ladder of yarn where they dropped? That can certainly be done, maybe not all the way to top, but till all the "run" is gone and then pull those two stitches to back and secure with sewing thread. Stockinette is the easiest dropped stitch to repair of them all....
Oct 6, 2011 03:55:45   #
jeanmb
 
Depending on its position after mending it you can cover it up with an applique (something baby-ish) either purchased or knit. Repeat it on the front or sleeve as a 'design element' :)
Oct 6, 2011 08:33:54   #
kittyknit
 
Dreamweaver wrote:
Do you know how to repair a droped stitch with a crochet hook - just walking the dropped stitches up the ladder of yarn where they dropped? That can certainly be done, maybe not all the way to top, but till all the "run" is gone and then pull those two stitches to back and secure with sewing thread. Stockinette is the easiest dropped stitch to repair of them all....


Thanks Dreamweaver, I never thought of that when the hole is far down the thwork; only if a couple of rows down. I'll do that next it happens to me. :-P
 
Oct 6, 2011 17:16:56   #
chriscol
 
There's no easy way to make this look intentional, but if you're willing to spend some time on the fix, it can be done.

You want your repair to be symmetrical--at the problem row in your sweater, you'll be decreasing by two stitches, but you want them equally spaced from the center back.

So your first decision has to be: exactly where do you want these two decreases to end up? Mark center back and these two positions with bits of scrap yarn or safety pins--and position your marks two rows ABOVE your mistake row. (Your mistake row is first row that is two stitches too short.)

The second question is: how do you move your one large hole into these two different positions.

(I'm going to assume that your stitches were dropped near the right side seam--I'll call this the "hole position", and that you want paired decreases, equally spaced out from the back center. Change the directions to reflect your reality.)

1. Pick up the dropped stitches as far as you can. Use double-pointed needles for this, or, possibly a short circular needle.

2. Continue across this same row, picking up stitches in the same row, until you have passed all of your marked columns. Place another marker in the fabric below the needle, marking the center back of the lower, wider piece.

3. Use another needle one row ABOVE your mistake row, and pick up all of the matching stitches in that row. You'll have two fewer stitches on the top needle. (So far, you've left the mistake row alone, but you're working immediately above and below it.)

4. Carefully snip the mistake row exactly at the center back. Gently unknit that row between the two needles. Take your cut ends to the back.

5. Thread a large-eyed dull-pointed seaming needle with a sufficiently long piece of new, matching yarn. Start with the Carefully weave this piece of repair yarn through the stitches on your two needles, re-knitting the upper and lower backs together.

Study your stitches carefully. Starting from the back, you'll come up through the first stitch on your lower needle, then stitch down through what looks like half a stitch on (or immediately next to) your upper needle, then back up through the next (apparent) half-stitch on the upper needle, and back down through the first stitch on your lower needle. Adjust the tension and positioning of the repair yarn so that you have 3-5 inches of free repair yarn on your right.

You can now slip one stitch off the right end of each knitting needle, and it should look like a regular knit stitch--except it may be a bit loose. That's OK, you can fine-tune the tension later. Keep going until you are directly below the first marked position.

6. At this point, you are going to knit two stitches together. You need to decide how you want them to overlap--If you want the right stitch over the left, you'll find that the weaving will be easier if you slip the two stitches knitwise off the lower needle, and then back on it purlwise. This will change the way you weave the yarn--it will come out as though you were knitting through the back loop. (You could cross the two yarns and work them as you've been doing, but crossing them will make them tight and harder to stitch through.)

7. Keep going. Your two center markers should line up perfectly. Keep going until you are at the left edge of your opening.

8. You now have two stitches to knit together again. If you followed the directions in 6 before, ignore them this time. If you ignored them before, follow them now. Your last upstroke will, like the first one, seem to be through a half-stitch--but once you finish, things should look fine.

9. Your sweater back should now be completely closed, with excess yarn to join on each end of your repair. Use your repair needle or any fine knitting needle to tug and adjust the tension of your repair stitches until they match the rest of your knitting.

10. Knot your yarns at each end, and weave in the loose ends.

Note: Once you've done the first step, you may want to switch to double-pointed needles that are several sizes smaller than those you chose to knit with in the first place. You want to use needles rather than waste yarn, because it would be much too easy to accidentally sew THROUGH waste yarn, and then getting it out when you were done would be a pain. Smaller needles offer the best of both options--you can't sew into a needle by mistake, but the smaller size will give you additional room to accurately maneuver your repair needle and yarn.
Oct 7, 2011 14:36:26   #
Grannybear
 
I agree with Dreamweaver about using a small crochet hook to draw each of the stitches as far up the back as you can till it disappears into the work then stitch it in place at the back of your work. When you have done this with both stitches I would then embroider some small daisy chain flowers randomly around the sweater covering up any noticable spots where you have tacked those stitches. If need be you could even place some french knots for centres and/or random chain stitches like a vine with leaves.
Oct 7, 2011 18:09:17   #
66sindy01
 
alegar75 wrote:
I have finished another baby sweater and found that I have a hole in the back of the sweater. Looks like two stitches were dropped.

Does anyone have a You Tube tutorial they can recommend or any suggestion on how to fix the hole? A friend suggested I darn the hole as I would a sock?

Any help is greatly appreciated.
Thank you!
Aletar


if you can get a machine knitting needle that has the latchet on you can pick up the stitches up and when you get them to where they should be you need only to put in a couple of stitches
 
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