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Sewing seams
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Apr 8, 2016 07:18:45   #
yooperdooper (a regular here)
 
I have heard of some people machine sewing flannel on a crocheted or knitted blanket with very good results.
 
Apr 8, 2016 07:32:40   #
Kitchenergal
 
Kenny440 wrote:
Good Morning All,
I have been wondering about this for a bit and decided to ask you all for your knowledgeable input. I am ready to sew the seams of a baby cardi and have been putting it off. I really detest sewing up and never feel like I do a terrific job of mine. So I am wondering if any of you have ever sewn seams with sewing machine stitching. Would that work? Or will it pull the seams and distort them too much? Of course, I could try it and see what happens. But I am afraid of ruining the sweater, in the process of either stitching or the possible ripping out. If any of you have done this before, please tell me how it worked. Or didn't! Thanks a bunch. Have a great knitting day. Kenney
Good Morning All, br I have been wondering about t... (show quote)


I was so frustrated when putting together a sweater for my great grandson. After ripping the seams out three times I grabbed a crochet hook and just picked up the stitch on the very edge. I wasn't totally happy, but it was a much neater result. It wasn't a flat seam, but it was much better than my hand sewn seam. I doubt that would work for everything, however it saved me a lot of frustration.
Apr 8, 2016 07:39:38   #
Beachkc
 
lkb850 wrote:
I used to hate to seam things, but once I learned mattress stitch it became as much as a part of the process as knitting. Seaming shoulder seams are even easier. Sleeves require a bit of patience but are not difficult. Once you have done it, you will sit back and admire your effort, knowing that you will be able to do it with your next project.


Ikb850, you have written my own thoughts. Learning the mattress stitch turned a dreaded or neglected task into part of the pleasant process of knitting.
I don't want others to bring me theirs to seam. While I love seaming, I am always eager for the next project and while I would and have seamed for others, I feel a bit put upon. There are people who seem to think they are doing me a favor by asking me to seam their work because they don't like to. It's is no favor.
Apr 8, 2016 08:00:05   #
beaz (a regular here)
 
prairiewmn wrote:
My suggestion if you want to machine stitch the seams, is to put a sheet of onion skin paper (very fine, see thru paper) on each side, upper and lower before feeding into the machine. This will keep the fibers from snagging on the feeder teeth. Then stitch with a narrow zig zag stitch so the seam has a little stretch. Do not tear off the paper till the seam meets your approval, so if you need to unpick, you can see the stitches.


I always used straight stitching and used wax paper on the bottom and never on the top because I need to see if the top is slipping. Oh, should mention this has never been on a hand knit, only knit fabric.
Apr 8, 2016 08:00:24   #
purplelady
 
Why not knit with fewer seams. DO the fronts and bacck at same time, , sleeves in the round etc? there will be joins at shoulders
or do them as top down , the angle seam showing, can t think of the name there.
oh! raglan seam. can adjsut most patterns to have feww seams

jvallas wrote:
I kind of hate to seam when it turns out looking less than "finished," and I kind of love to seam when I hit upon a really nice looking seam. I sometimes think people's dislike of it is less about hating to sew (I actually like sewing) and more about being afraid the finish won't look as good as the knitting. Maybe it's just me.

I keep telling myself to work up a bunch of swatches and practice seaming them together. Probably never going to happen, though!

I suspect you won't be all that happy with a machine seam, but it might depend on the fabric you've knit.
I kind of hate to seam when it turns out looking l... (show quote)
Apr 8, 2016 08:05:17   #
lenorehf
 
galaxycraft wrote:
Seams are incorporated into a pattern for a reason --- structure and stability.
Don't be afraid of hand seaming, once you get the hang or it, it will be second nature. :-)
I would view the different ways to seam -- some are even invisible or near invisible seaming.
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=sewing+seams+in+knitting
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=ways+to+seam+in+knitting

Thanks for the links. I too do not do well sewing seams together. These videos are real helpful.
 
Apr 8, 2016 08:39:50   #
galaxycraft
 
lenorehf wrote:
Thanks for the links. I too do not do well sewing seams together. These videos are real helpful.

You are welcome. You will find what works best for you and your project. Happy Crafting. :-)
Apr 8, 2016 08:43:15   #
Jean Keith
 
I know that there are several ways to seam but I've always used the back stitch which works very well. Seaming is a thankless job and one I hate, detest, abhor.
Apr 8, 2016 08:51:28   #
Deri
 
Jean Keith wrote:
I know that there are several ways to seam but I've always used the back stitch which works very well. Seaming is a thankless job and one I hate, detest, abhor.


:thumbup:
Apr 8, 2016 09:12:01   #
Nanny26
 
In my knitting group, they say why would you machine sew when you've made the entire piece by hand. I guess that makes sense, so now I always hand sew the seams. It's much easier to ease the stitches in if one side seems longer. Often there is stretching of the yarn when you sew by machine, so often one side is much longer than the other.
Apr 8, 2016 09:18:41   #
carmicv
 
I am about to close the underarms in a bulky knit in the round child's sweater. Which would be more comfortable and look nicer
3 needle bind off or Kitchener or other?
 
Apr 8, 2016 10:03:54   #
mojac
 
45 yrs ago I had a secretary who wore nothing but hand knit suits that were gorgeous. She was from England and knit everything. All of her clothes were put together on the sewing machine. She used tissue paper on both sides and a small stitch. In those days she did not have a zig zag stitch or a stretch stitch to use. I use a stretch stitch and it comes out great with the tissue paper. Most of the knitting I do is for babies or toddlers. I am just getting into the older children and I am sure this will work with them also and give strength as they play ball etc..As some one said do not take the paper off until you are sure everything is straight Try this on a sample.
Apr 8, 2016 10:05:36   #
Nicoleg
 
Very pink.com is my favorite to watch! If you have time check out her tutorials!
Apr 8, 2016 11:03:25   #
Nancy Deak (a regular here)
 
prairiewmn wrote:
My suggestion if you want to machine stitch the seams, is to put a sheet of onion skin paper (very fine, see thru paper) on each side, upper and lower before feeding into the machine. This will keep the fibers from snagging on the feeder teeth. Then stitch with a narrow zig zag stitch so the seam has a little stretch. Do not tear off the paper till the seam meets your approval, so if you need to unpick, you can see the stitches.


You can also use adding machine tape or strips of other thin paper.
Apr 8, 2016 11:19:18   #
knitteerli
 
My friend is an expert seamstress and knitter. She often sews seams of knitted garments on a sewing machine, using one of the stretch stitches that have been on machines for decades now. Don't know if she uses paper under and over, but I suspect she does as she is very picky about doing everything well. Most mass knitted garments are finished on a serger or overlocker and you don't know until you look inside.

I prefer mattress stitch and grafting or kitchener stitch myself, but I'm just too chicken to take my knitting near a serger or swing machine. But I know my friend's stuff looks perfect. One day, I will try it out on an old sweater, I'm sure I'll find directions in one of my serger books.
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