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Twiddle Muffs Help
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May 1, 2017 00:38:25   #
crivitz
 
Up until now I had no reason to make any twiddle muffs but I was asked last week to make as many as I felt I could handle for a charitable organization which will distribute them to nursing homes. I have a great start on the knitting but got to thinking about the twiddling things to put on them. Should I decorate them figuring that they will be laundered or probably not laundered? I have a ton of wood beads I was thinking of using (stringing maybe three) but they wouldn't do well in the laundry. And what are anyone's thoughts of attaching a couple things on a muff using those covered pony tail bands so that the item (I was thinking a big button or some such thing) could be pulled upon and around. Good idea or not? And those who have made these muffs do you secure the various twiddling things through both layers of knitting for more security or just through one layer? Any other ideas would be appreciated. I'm not going to attempt to make each one different. I see no reason for that since I would think it would be only one per person. I can probably make seven or eight out of the same yarn before I run out and start on other yarn which will again make multiples.
 
May 1, 2017 04:13:01   #
Appin
 
You can use up so much. I make them, but with fabric. Add different textures, crochet flowers, butterflies, spirals, strips of fleece fabric. Big buttons, beads, zips, keys, ribbons, pony tail elastics, velcro, ribbons with beads and buttons threaded on, etc. I just keep a basket and throw in any little bits and bobs I have, then make a batch of mats and muffs for the nursing home. I attach them with my sewing machine, and multiple zig zag stitches, but any way of securing firmly will work.
If you have short lengths of fuzzy or textured yarn, just knit a couple of rows with it.
May 1, 2017 04:16:49   #
YarnCreations
 
crivitz wrote:
Up until now I had no reason to make any twiddle muffs but I was asked last week to make as many as I felt I could handle for a charitable organization which will distribute them to nursing homes. I have a great start on the knitting but got to thinking about the twiddling things to put on them. Should I decorate them figuring that they will be laundered or probably not laundered? I have a ton of wood beads I was thinking of using (stringing maybe three) but they wouldn't do well in the laundry. And what are anyone's thoughts of attaching a couple things on a muff using those covered pony tail bands so that the item (I was thinking a big button or some such thing) could be pulled upon and around. Good idea or not? And those who have made these muffs do you secure the various twiddling things through both layers of knitting for more security or just through one layer? Any other ideas would be appreciated. I'm not going to attempt to make each one different. I see no reason for that since I would think it would be only one per person. I can probably make seven or eight out of the same yarn before I run out and start on other yarn which will again make multiples.
Up until now I had no reason to make any twiddle m... (show quote)


I use lots of different buttons, wooden, metal, plastic etc, large ones, some on shanks, triangular and square ones. I secure them only to one side of the knitted fabric before I sew up, rather than through the double fabric. Shank buttons can be knitted on, just in the same way you would attach a bead with a crochet hook. Others I attach by threading wool through the holes and the tie at least a double knot on the reverse of the knitted fabric - I find this lasts better than sewing on using cotton thread, and if you're making a lot, this method is quicker too. Washing may remove some of the shine on wooden buttons, but they should still be able to provide good twiddling material.

I also knit different textures, especially bobbles and cables, into the fabric as this makes it more interesting for the "twiddler". I've even knitted tiny pockets into the muff. Using different coloured and textured yarns also gives additional interest both to the knitter and the user. I sometimes knit a few rows garter stitch in narrow ribbon between some stocking stitch in ordinary wool. I try to make the muff ends in very soft yarn (eyelash yarns are great here) so that this doesn't feel rough on the users' wrists. I've been wary of attaching anything with elastic as I didn't want anything to snap back on the hands of the user - dementia sufferers are often elderly and have fragile skin.

Here's some I made earlier...




May 1, 2017 08:46:43   #
kdpa07734 (a regular here)
 
Lovely muffs. Some folks put a tissue/hanky pocket on the outside... I haven't done that yet, but probably will on the next ones I make.
May 1, 2017 15:07:51   #
Butterfly53 (a regular here)
 
Thank you for the suggestions! My 5-year-old granddaughter has been diagnosed with "mild autism", so I've thought about one of these--she is bothered in large groups of people--but couldn't wrap my head around what to "decorate" it with.
May 1, 2017 15:38:23   #
babsbarb
 
One of the things I put on my twiddle muffs is a pompom without cutting the ends. Or you can use the small flower loom. Whatever you put on, just make sure it is securely attached. I also do not do a double layer. I have not heard how they hold up, but I would think if they were not holding up, I would be told when I take additional items.
I also make crocheted curls, for lack of a better word. ♥
 
May 1, 2017 23:34:01   #
mamanacy
 
I have read that using wool for the twiddle muffs could be a problem if person allergic to wool. Suggest cotton or acrylic and then won't have to worry about shrinking. Wish I could make suggestions for the autistic twiddle muffs, but maybe the Autistic association could make suggestions. JAT. N
May 2, 2017 07:02:03   #
maspd
 
I buy baby dolls from Ice Yarns and attach one securely to each twiddle muff. I have also attached meat tokens from ww11 as they have a hole in the centre. A lot of my bits and bobs I got by hounding thrift stores.
May 2, 2017 07:09:47   #
gdhavens
 
I assumed the ones I made would be washed, so used acrylic yarn. Different textures and colors are good, and anything that can be fingered, buttons, curlyques (sp?), pompons, maybe even bath scrubby poufs, making sure they are firmly attached. I did mine in two layers, put a zipper on the outside layer with a pompon attached to the zipper pull so that small things could be put inside. I made one for a friend's father, and she put different exercise items in the "pocket" for him to find on different days. She reported that he loved finding these little treasurers. I always said in my head "what would be safe and fun for a two yr. old?" and worked with that.
May 2, 2017 10:16:54   #
Sukiesue (a regular here)
 
This subject has come just at the right time for me, I was debating whether to make one for an old friend who has deteriorated quite quickly with alzeimers & vascular dementia & is constantly picking at things,the hem of her skirt or cuff, or shredding a tissue. I'd read about twiddle muffs & wondered if this was the solution so I think I'll give it a try,if it's no good for her someone else in the home might make use of it. I've plenty of dk,chunky & fun yarn to use,what sort of size? 🐹
May 2, 2017 10:26:42   #
maspd
 
go online and look up the pattern for Twiddle Muffs from a hospital in England and make sure you use lots of fun yarns for the outside of it. The inside i make plain with all the odds left over from other projects. The more colours the better IMHO. I make mine 24 inches long and about 50 stitches wide if i use DK weight. Also knit them on a smaller than normal needle so they are not too loose to get fingers caught. Hope this helps. You do not have to worry about the ends being neat as the ends are in the inside of the muff and no one sees it. I also leave the ends of fun fur on the outside as they are something to twiddle with.
 
May 2, 2017 10:30:11   #
maspd
 
i made one for kids that has lots of stuff like pckets, buttonholes and buttons, baby dolls and anything that interests a child. I was asked to make one for a child to get them off sucking their thumb.




Butterfly53 wrote:
Thank you for the suggestions! My 5-year-old granddaughter has been diagnosed with "mild autism", so I've thought about one of these--she is bothered in large groups of people--but couldn't wrap my head around what to "decorate" it with.
May 2, 2017 10:45:17   #
JTM (a regular here)
 
crivitz wrote:
Up until now I had no reason to make any twiddle muffs but I was asked last week to make as many as I felt I could handle for a charitable organization which will distribute them to nursing homes. I have a great start on the knitting but got to thinking about the twiddling things to put on them. Should I decorate them figuring that they will be laundered or probably not laundered? I have a ton of wood beads I was thinking of using (stringing maybe three) but they wouldn't do well in the laundry. And what are anyone's thoughts of attaching a couple things on a muff using those covered pony tail bands so that the item (I was thinking a big button or some such thing) could be pulled upon and around. Good idea or not? And those who have made these muffs do you secure the various twiddling things through both layers of knitting for more security or just through one layer? Any other ideas would be appreciated. I'm not going to attempt to make each one different. I see no reason for that since I would think it would be only one per person. I can probably make seven or eight out of the same yarn before I run out and start on other yarn which will again make multiples.
Up until now I had no reason to make any twiddle m... (show quote)


100% washable would be best.
May 2, 2017 13:49:01   #
Lindaknitssocks
 
Beautiful muffs! May I ask the dimensions?
YarnCreations wrote:
I use lots of different buttons, wooden, metal, plastic etc, large ones, some on shanks, triangular and square ones. I secure them only to one side of the knitted fabric before I sew up, rather than through the double fabric. Shank buttons can be knitted on, just in the same way you would attach a bead with a crochet hook. Others I attach by threading wool through the holes and the tie at least a double knot on the reverse of the knitted fabric - I find this lasts better than sewing on using cotton thread, and if you're making a lot, this method is quicker too. Washing may remove some of the shine on wooden buttons, but they should still be able to provide good twiddling material.

I also knit different textures, especially bobbles and cables, into the fabric as this makes it more interesting for the "twiddler". I've even knitted tiny pockets into the muff. Using different coloured and textured yarns also gives additional interest both to the knitter and the user. I sometimes knit a few rows garter stitch in narrow ribbon between some stocking stitch in ordinary wool. I try to make the muff ends in very soft yarn (eyelash yarns are great here) so that this doesn't feel rough on the users' wrists. I've been wary of attaching anything with elastic as I didn't want anything to snap back on the hands of the user - dementia sufferers are often elderly and have fragile skin.

Here's some I made earlier...
I use lots of different buttons, wooden, metal, pl... (show quote)
May 3, 2017 20:10:23   #
Katie in Maine (a regular here)
 
Such a thoughtful thing to do! I think they'd be great for anyone with ADHD, anxiety, Autism or any form of dementia.
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