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What is your preferred way of doing GSR heel?
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Jan 9, 2019 01:06:11   #
engblom
 
There are quite a few ways to do GSR heels. Some are stacking the short rows sections straight upon each other, some are having two rows between the two short rows sections and some knit all around to separate them. What is your preferred way of doing GSR heel and why do you prefer this way?
 
Jan 9, 2019 02:04:48   #
eneira12 (a regular here)
 
What is a GSR heel anyway?
Jan 9, 2019 02:25:00   #
GrumpyGramma (a regular here)
 
GSR heel = German Short Row heel

I work across picking up the double stitches after the last turn then resume knitting in the round. When I come to the remaining double stitches I pick them up and complete the round. I work one full round before continuing. I'm not sure how to count to answer your question but maybe you can figure it out. I do it this way because I like doing it this way. In practical terms, I like having a full round between the first half with short row turns and the second half; it minimizes my opportunities to mess up a picked up double stitch. Doing it this way I start 2 5/8" before the total length of the foot.
Jan 9, 2019 03:58:09   #
engblom
 
GrumpyGramma wrote:
GSR heel = German Short Row heel

I work across picking up the double stitches after the last turn then resume knitting in the round. When I come to the remaining double stitches I pick them up and complete the round. I work one full round before continuing. I'm not sure how to count to answer your question but maybe you can figure it out. I do it this way because I like doing it this way. In practical terms, I like having a full round between the first half with short row turns and the second half; it minimizes my opportunities to mess up a picked up double stitch. Doing it this way I start 2 5/8" before the total length of the foot.
GSR heel = German Short Row heel br br I work acr... (show quote)


Please, if it is not too much trouble, could you make a photo of a very slightly stretched heel knitted in this way? I would want to judge myself how well this method hides the holes.
Jan 9, 2019 07:43:17   #
checht
 
engblom wrote:
Please, if it is not too much trouble, could you make a photo of a very slightly stretched heel knitted in this way? I would want to judge myself how well this method hides the holes.


Very pink knits on you tube compares wrap and turn heel with gsr and stretches it.

https://youtu.be/52qy8OOb-s0
Jan 9, 2019 07:49:48   #
checht
 
engblom wrote:
There are quite a few ways to do GSR heels. Some are stacking the short rows sections straight upon each other, some are having two rows between the two short rows sections and some knit all around to separate them. What is your preferred way of doing GSR heel and why do you prefer this way?


I only recently learned German short row instead of wrap and turn. If I understand your question properly, I stacked the gsr without knitting plain rows in between. If you don’t knit to the end then there are no gaps at the place where there would normally be a gusset
 
Jan 9, 2019 09:47:54   #
Yarn Happy
 
I love the faux heel pattern from KnitFreedom.com, I substitute GSR where the pattern calls for W&T, love this pattern because it fits so well.
Jan 9, 2019 11:21:48   #
eneira12 (a regular here)
 
Thank you. Now I just need the lead in from the leg and the lead out to the foot to make this fully useful. I'm seeing my children and their families late for Christmas celebration this coming weekend and have one more pair of adult socks to finish knitting. I'm trying to do each pair with a different heel to see which I like best and I wonder if I could just substitute this for another short row heel. I have a book, "Socks a la Carte" which would have the lead in and lead out if I can just substitute this for their short row heel. What do you think? Then I'll let you know if I like it.
Jan 9, 2019 14:27:09   #
GrumpyGramma (a regular here)
 
engblom wrote:
Please, if it is not too much trouble, could you make a photo of a very slightly stretched heel knitted in this way? I would want to judge myself how well this method hides the holes.


If I had a pair to do that with it wouldn't be any trouble. I make them for my daughter so she has them. I only do gusseted socks for myself. Holes aren't a problem, that much I know. If I can figure out where I might have stashed a photo I'll share it with you. I might find something online about doing them this way.
Jan 9, 2019 14:28:46   #
GrumpyGramma (a regular here)
 
Yarn Happy wrote:
I love the faux heel pattern from KnitFreedom.com, I substitute GSR where the pattern calls for W&T, love this pattern because it fits so well.


I have a pair with this heel just waiting for the turn. I too do GSR. Any other short row method is a pita IMHO.
Jan 9, 2019 14:32:40   #
GrumpyGramma (a regular here)
 
eneira12 wrote:
Thank you. Now I just need the lead in from the leg and the lead out to the foot to make this fully useful. I'm seeing my children and their families late for Christmas celebration this coming weekend and have one more pair of adult socks to finish knitting. I'm trying to do each pair with a different heel to see which I like best and I wonder if I could just substitute this for another short row heel. I have a book, "Socks a la Carte" which would have the lead in and lead out if I can just substitute this for their short row heel. What do you think? Then I'll let you know if I like it.
Thank you. Now I just need the lead in from the l... (show quote)


Basically a short row heel is a short row heel and how you do your turning stitches is a matter of personal preference though picking up a double stitch and using the new stitch to do another double stitch can be problematic. For many of us GSR give both ease of execution and good appearance. One caveat: Working a round or rounds between the two halves of the heel can affect when you start the heel on a toe up sock. Knitting cuff down, just do your heel and the foot length can be determined as you proceed.
 
Jan 9, 2019 15:04:58   #
GrumpyGramma (a regular here)
 
Suggestion: Using worsted weight yarn that you have handy knit a tube, do a GSR heel one way and knit a few round after. Repeat for each one you're curious about. You can do it baby sock size or to fit around your foot and try it on. I prefer to test on a piece that I can actually put on my foot.

You asked about holes. Where are you seeing holes? Knowing what your'e trying to fix would be helpful.
Jan 9, 2019 16:18:24   #
engblom
 
GrumpyGramma wrote:
If I had a pair to do that with it wouldn't be any trouble. I make them for my daughter so she has them. I only do gusseted socks for myself. Holes aren't a problem, that much I know. If I can figure out where I might have stashed a photo I'll share it with you. I might find something online about doing them this way.


Personally I would not like a "normal" sock with GSR or any other short row method. A normal short row heel is too tight for my feet. After the success I had with my latest sock (with 3/4 of the stitches for the heel flap) I am thinking about making a GSR heel with the same ideas. I would use far more than half of the stitches for the heel (maybe also here 3/4 of the stitches) and some increases before the heel and some decreases after. I think this might become comfortable.

Now all I am looking for is information on how to use GSR best in order to avoid holes.
Jan 9, 2019 16:21:28   #
engblom
 
GrumpyGramma wrote:

You asked about holes. Where are you seeing holes? Knowing what your'e trying to fix would be helpful.

I have never used GSR so far but I have seen on the net some horror socks with big visible holes at the seam and I would want to avoid mistakes from the beginning when taking a new technique into use.
Jan 9, 2019 16:44:21   #
GrumpyGramma (a regular here)
 
engblom wrote:
I have never used GSR so far but I have seen on the net some horror socks with big visible holes at the seam and I would want to avoid mistakes from the beginning when taking a new technique into use.


My only suggestion for avoiding problems is to do a practice piece and see what happens. Works for me. Until you've actually done it you can't know what the result will be.
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