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How do You Define Front Loop and Back Loop?
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Feb 10, 2019 11:11:50   #
engblom
 
Assume you have an audience that know nothing about knitting except for the terms "stitch" and "needle". How would you write the definition of front loop and back loop?
 
Feb 10, 2019 11:16:17   #
JTM (a regular here)
 
engblom wrote:
Assume you have an audience that know nothing about knitting except for the terms "stitch" and "needle". How would you write the definition of front loop and back loop?


I would not use either term. I would use the term leading leg instead of front, and following leg orleg farthest from needle tip instead of back loop.
Front and back legs of stitches do not always present themselves the same. When I knit stockinette flat the leading leg on the knit row is behind the left needle, due to the way I work my purl row...Combined Continental knitter.
When I knit stockinette in the round, with no purl rows, the leading leg is to the front of theleft needle.
When I see front and/or back leg, I have to determine if a twisted stitch is planned or a straight stitch.
Feb 10, 2019 11:18:30   #
knit4ES (a regular here)
 
I think of it as "front of the loop" and "back of the loop"
There is one loop, but part of it is towards the front of the needle and part of it is towards the back of the needle
Feb 10, 2019 11:26:48   #
engblom
 
I would say something like this: If you look at a stitch you will notice it is not mounted completely perpendicularly to the needle, it is slightly slanted. If you pull this stitch wider you make it more and more slanted until you notice that one side of the loop is facing you. That is the front loop. The side of the loop not facing you is the back loop.
Feb 10, 2019 12:14:04   #
targa416 (a regular here)
 
Giving the audience a picture with arrows would be worth a thousand words in this setting.
Feb 10, 2019 12:59:16   #
fergablu2
 
targa416 wrote:
Giving the audience a picture with arrows would be worth a thousand words in this setting.


 
Feb 10, 2019 13:06:35   #
bokemom (a regular here)
 
My grandma always said to think of a cowboy on a horse, which leg is forward. Forty years later this is still the image in my head. Lol
Feb 10, 2019 14:43:48   #
JennyG12 (a regular here)
 
Yup. :) Picture worth a thousand words. As patterns are written with 'front' and 'back' I would use those terms. (front leg/back leg).
I personally know 'loops' as being in crochet.
Feb 11, 2019 08:41:56   #
BethKlinger
 
I always see "front loop" and "back loop" in patterns. I would stick to those words ... and the picture is ideal!
Feb 11, 2019 09:11:53   #
engblom
 
Personally, I think the expressions "front loop" and "back loop" is often used in a wrong way. While I think the original meaning of "front loop" is the side of the loop/stitch that would end up as a V if you knitted a stockinette stitch (from front side) it is has gotten a new meaning of coming from the left into the stitch. Thus with what I think is the original definition, even people knitting with the Continental Combined style go into the front loop, despite the fact that they go into the stitch from the right side.
Feb 11, 2019 16:42:59   #
jo Gillen
 
I would tell them to knit the stitch a usual - leave it on both needles - flip the right hand needle around and behind the left needle and knit into the stitch again. Remove the stitch from the left needle to the right needlle. The result is two stitches from one, (making an increase of one stitch.) Notice there will be a little bar on the front where the new stitch was formed.
 
Feb 11, 2019 20:03:21   #
Nanamel14 (a regular here)
 
Great clear pic 👍👍
Feb 12, 2019 00:30:33   #
mavies
 
the part of the stitch that is closest to your yarn ball is the front or leading part, the part that is next to the row already knitted is the back part of the stitch.
Feb 12, 2019 01:58:46   #
JTM (a regular here)
 
engblom wrote:
Personally, I think the expressions "front loop" and "back loop" is often used in a wrong way. While I think the original meaning of "front loop" is the side of the loop/stitch that would end up as a V if you knitted a stockinette stitch (from front side) it is has gotten a new meaning of coming from the left into the stitch. Thus with what I think is the original definition, even people knitting with the Continental Combined style go into the front loop, despite the fact that they go into the stitch from the right side.
Personally, I think the expressions "front lo... (show quote)


If knitting stockinette as a combined continentalknitter, when working a knit stitch, the leading leg of the stitch iß to thebàck of left needle. However, whenknitting in the round, withnopurlrows for stockinette, the leading leg is to the front of the left needle. With combined Continental knitting, the purlstitchißnot wrapped around the needle, but is "picked" in a manner similar to the way a knit stitch is worked, thus using a little less yarn per purl stitch, and leaving that stitch with the opposite orientàtionon the needle.
 
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