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An example of blocking
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Jun 20, 2019 12:08:02   #
MMWRay (a regular here)
 
While I had this stretched out on the wires I thought others might like to see a photo of a rectangular wrap blocked. The wires really help to make even edges and sizing. My mat is the click together floor cushion. I use welding wires as recommended on KP years ago. This took 6 wires to block. It is the Diffraction shawl knit in a Hobby Lobby fingering weight nonpill acrylic. This is the wrong side by the way as I was trying to not compress the I cord bind off all around the edge.




 
Jun 20, 2019 12:11:07   #
Knitting in the Rockys (a regular here)
 
I assume you are wet blocking. Why bother with acrylic yarn? Acrylic responds best to steam blocking.
Jun 20, 2019 12:13:10   #
Chrissy (a regular here)
 
Knitting in the Rockys wrote:
I assume you are wet blocking. Why bother with acrylic yarn? Acrylic responds best to steam blocking.


I wet block with good results.
Jun 20, 2019 12:16:50   #
Munchn (a regular here)
 
Thank you for these tips. I love the wedding ring quilt on the bed...
Jun 20, 2019 12:34:09   #
bevvyreay (a regular here)
 
Chrissy wrote:
I wet block with good results.


Hi Chrissy. I’m intrigued if you wet block do you repeat each time you wash the item? I’ve always assumed wet blocking would work but not permanently
Jun 20, 2019 12:36:14   #
Knitting in the Rockys (a regular here)
 
Chrissy wrote:
I wet block with good results.


With a wet blocking, acrylic will not hold that blocking like natural fibers do, it's gone after the item has been worn once. Wet block rolling out of an acrylic item, it might last few hours, or it might last just long enough to pull the pins/wires out.
 
Jun 20, 2019 13:25:28   #
MMWRay (a regular here)
 
Knitting in the Rockys wrote:
I assume you are wet blocking. Why bother with acrylic yarn? Acrylic responds best to steam blocking.

Isn't there a quote about assumptions make an ass of you? I steam blocked lightly as this is stockinette and will roll.
Jun 20, 2019 13:31:39   #
Knitting in the Rockys (a regular here)
 
MMWRay wrote:
Isn't there a quote about assumptions make an ass of you? I steam blocked lightly as this is stockinette and will roll.


Steam blocking wouldn't require the use of blocking wires. Blocking wires are usually used for wet blocking.
Jun 20, 2019 14:05:13   #
tdorminey (a regular here)
 
Knitting in the Rockys wrote:
Steam blocking wouldn't require the use of blocking wires. Blocking wires are usually used for wet blocking.

While true for many items, the wires would help to block in straight sides, ends and squared corners on this long rectangular piece. What works for one doesn't necessarily work for everyone.
Jun 20, 2019 14:19:43   #
JennyG12
 
MMWRay wrote:
While I had this stretched out on the wires I thought others might like to see a photo of a rectangular wrap blocked. The wires really help to make even edges and sizing. My mat is the click together floor cushion. I use welding wires as recommended on KP years ago. This took 6 wires to block. It is the Diffraction shawl knit in a Hobby Lobby fingering weight nonpill acrylic. This is the wrong side by the way as I was trying to not compress the I cord bind off all around the edge.


Looks wonderful. Thank you for the info and photos. :))
Jun 20, 2019 14:26:21   #
JennyG12
 
Chrissy wrote:
I wet block with good results.


I do as well. Even with blocking wires and pins! How else are you going to hold it in place along the lengths?
I also put them in the dryer when wet and let the machine 'steam' block acrylic. I take it out just prior to it being completely dry and pin it out for the final touchups.

Blocking with acrylic, just pin out to the finished size, and let dry. Acrylic will not have as much give to it as a natural fiber would, that is why you can not aggressively block acrylic like you can with natural. If you were to attempt it, it will just spring back to the 'natural' measurement final size in a short period of time. Once you block acrylic it does not need blocking again like the repeated blocking needed for natural fibers.
 
Jun 20, 2019 14:30:22   #
Dsynr (a regular here)
 
MMWRay wrote:
Isn't there a quote about assumptions make an ass of you? I steam blocked lightly as this is stockinette and will roll.
Acrylic does not usually lend itself to good blocking.
A hard steaming will "Kill" acrylic fibres.
Jun 20, 2019 14:31:56   #
JennyG12
 
bevvyreay wrote:
Hi Chrissy. I’m intrigued if you wet block do you repeat each time you wash the item? I’ve always assumed wet blocking would work but not permanently

Repeated blocking only needs to be done when using a natural fiber. Acrylics only need the one time, whether wet block or steam block.
This also, is a personal choice as to the results that is being sought after. If you want the item to go a bit limp with softness, then lightly steam block. If you are happy with the denser fabric of the washed item, then just wet block it.
Jun 20, 2019 14:34:07   #
JennyG12
 
MMWRay wrote:
Isn't there a quote about assumptions make an ass of you? I steam blocked lightly as this is stockinette and will roll.


A light steam blocking is fine. A person needs to know the stages of steam blocking. Light/mild/heavy/kill. As anything else in the crafts, it is trial and error for each person. It is a personal learning curve.
As an added note, you were correct in being cautious around the I-cord.
Jun 20, 2019 15:49:59   #
MMWRay (a regular here)
 
Knitting in the Rockys wrote:
Steam blocking wouldn't require the use of blocking wires. Blocking wires are usually used for wet blocking.


Not true at all. Blocking wires work just as well for acrylic and steam blocking as for wet blocking on animal fibers. How else do you shape your project to block if not with pins and wires?
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