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Knit a long: need help
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Jun 29, 2019 10:12:09   #
mrswyzard1521
 
Good day, I am trying to do the knit a long on Facebook by “Pattern Duchess “ it’s only two rows a day so it should be easy!
But there is one stitch that for the life of me I can not seem to do correctly so I can purl it off. Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.
Stitch name: nupp
Stitch directions: in one stitch, (k1,yo,k1,yo,k1,yo,k1) so 7 stitches in one stitch.
Ok I can do that!
But the next row is K1,p to last st,k1; well no matter what I do I can not get all the stitches in the nupp st to allow my knitting needle to go in and purl it off. I watched the tube video she put up for it and still not working!
Any and all help appreciated
Thank you in advance
 
Jun 29, 2019 10:18:38   #
knit4ES (a regular here)
 
do a browser search for knit nupp .... several photo and video tutorials are available
Jun 29, 2019 10:18:53   #
Knitting in the Rockys (a regular here)
 
Nupps can be awkward to purl. I keep a much smaller knitting needle handy for purling nupps. Once I have pulled that purl stitch through the multiple stitches and yarn overs, I simply transfer it to my actual working needle (or other end of the circular). You can use a smaller sized DPN because you aren't going to keep the purled stitches on that needle anyway. This is when having small sized DPNs really comes in handy.
Jun 29, 2019 10:27:50   #
mrswyzard1521
 
Thank you, will give that a try
Jun 29, 2019 10:28:20   #
mrswyzard1521
 
Thank you
Jun 29, 2019 10:46:50   #
RoxyCatlady
 
Use a crochet hook! That helps. There is a great tutorial on https://northernlace.co.uk/2011/01/05/how-to-knit-nupps/
 
Jun 29, 2019 11:36:28   #
mrswyzard1521
 
Watched that one! Thank you
Jun 29, 2019 11:47:53   #
flightpath
 
Great suggestions!
Jun 29, 2019 12:12:30   #
Cimmanon
 
You must make your stitches VERY BIG when you're doing the K,YO,K series. Try to make them about 1/2 inch long. I know, that seems crazy, but it works. I pull my right needle far to the right after each K and YO to elongate the stitch, then I hold the stitches down on my right needle with my finger while I do the rest of the Ks and YOs so the stitches STAY long and aren't sucked up by the subsequent stitches. Then, after you've worked all the stitches in the nupp, insert your left needle into all the nupp stitches on the right needle and stretch them into a uniform size. This prevents the last stitches from shrinking up. Keep a finger on the nupp stitches when you knit the next stitch or two in the pattern to help keep them BIG. When you get to the purl row, do the same stretch. Insert your right needle into all the nupp stitches on the left needle and stretch them into a little uniformly sized tube. All these steps take a long time, but after you master the technique you may be able to eliminate some of them because you'll know how BIG to make the stitches.

You could try to work up to a large nupp by starting with a K,YO,K nupp, master that, then move on to a K,YO,K,YO,K nupp, master that, etc. Just keep making the stitches bigger and bigger until you can easily purl them on the next row. It also helps to use a larger yarn when learning, it's much easier than lace weight and will teach you the technique. Good luck, you can do it!

The word of the day is BIG!
Jun 29, 2019 12:47:24   #
Knitting in the Rockys (a regular here)
 
Cimmanon wrote:
You must make your stitches VERY BIG when you're doing the K,YO,K series. Try to make them about 1/2 inch long. I know, that seems crazy, but it works. I pull my right needle far to the right after each K and YO to elongate the stitch, then I hold the stitches down on my right needle with my finger while I do the rest of the Ks and YOs so the stitches STAY long and aren't sucked up by the subsequent stitches. Then, after you've worked all the stitches in the nupp, insert your left needle into all the nupp stitches on the right needle and stretch them into a uniform size. This prevents the last stitches from shrinking up. Keep a finger on the nupp stitches when you knit the next stitch or two in the pattern to help keep them BIG. When you get to the purl row, do the same stretch. Insert your right needle into all the nupp stitches on the left needle and stretch them into a little uniformly sized tube. All these steps take a long time, but after you master the technique you may be able to eliminate some of them because you'll know how BIG to make the stitches.

You could try to work up to a large nupp by starting with a K,YO,K nupp, master that, then move on to a K,YO,K,YO,K nupp, master that, etc. Just keep making the stitches bigger and bigger until you can easily purl them on the next row. It also helps to use a larger yarn when learning, it's much easier than lace weight and will teach you the technique. Good luck, you can do it!

The word of the day is BIG!
You must make your stitches VERY BIG when you're d... (show quote)


The problem with that is that the nupps end up looking "sloppy" because of the loose stitches.
Jun 29, 2019 12:54:48   #
MMWRay (a regular here)
 
Knitting in the Rockys wrote:
Nupps can be awkward to purl. I keep a much smaller knitting needle handy for purling nupps. Once I have pulled that purl stitch through the multiple stitches and yarn overs, I simply transfer it to my actual working needle (or other end of the circular). You can use a smaller sized DPN because you aren't going to keep the purled stitches on that needle anyway. This is when having small sized DPNs really comes in handy.


Perfect answer!
 
Jun 29, 2019 13:02:02   #
Cimmanon
 
Knitting in the Rockys wrote:
The problem with that is that the nupps end up looking "sloppy" because of the loose stitches.


With practice, the loops of the nupps are the perfect size, easy to purl but not sloppy.
Jun 29, 2019 13:09:21   #
Knitting in the Rockys (a regular here)
 
Cimmanon wrote:
With practice, the loops of the nupps are the perfect size, easy to purl but not sloppy.


In a knitting group, another member and I did a side by side comparison. She used the "loose stitch" method and I used my smaller sized DPN. There was a distinct difference in the neatness of the nupps.
Jun 29, 2019 13:59:20   #
Paulaross
 
I use a crochet hook
Jun 29, 2019 16:34:19   #
m_azingrace
 
Knitting in the Rockys wrote:
The problem with that is that the nupps end up looking "sloppy" because of the loose stitches.

I love making nupps! I typically pull each nupp loop to about twice the diameter of the needle. Then on the return row, I carefully insert the needle into the loops one at a time, making sure to catch every one, so that each loop, is at that point ,surrounding both needles very close to the needles' narrow ends. Now I wrap the yarn purlwise around the receiving needle, and carefully pull it through all the loops. Regulating the loops according to the needle size helps prevent sloppiness. It takes practice; a LOT of practice to perfect this skill, but it pays off in the end. The first nupp project I tried had three-loop nupps. It was challenging, and I enjoyed it. Breaking into nupp-love in this gentle way is something I recommend. When you are good with them, move on to the fives, then the sevens, and even the nines. I personally prefer the fives. Not because I cannot do the others, but because I consider the fives to be "just right". So I adjust patterns that call for more loops to suit my individual taste. Nupps eat up a considerable amount of yarn too, so that is another factor to consider.
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