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Lost Words From Our Childhood
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Aug 13, 2019 01:03:06   #
marolsh
 
My earliest school memory, in first grade, is of crouching under my desk during an air raid drill. We were told to turn our backs to the windows, but it was a corner room with windows on two sides, so it was impossible to find any kind of "shelter." Also, we were expected to wear our dogtags to school every day so that if we were incinerated in a nuclear attack, our remains would be identifiable. I was five, and it made a hell of an impression on me.
 
Aug 13, 2019 01:57:30   #
Montana Gramma (a regular here)
 
My Gkids say 'geeze Louise and for crying in the pickle barrel, their friends just crack up! They can be programmed, lol! If a four letter word came out of their mouths I would be shocked, but even some little preschoolers are swearing these days.
Aug 13, 2019 01:57:37   #
MrsGreenJeans
 
Don't let the bed bugs bite, was another we used in our home all the time!
Aug 13, 2019 02:11:09   #
Judy M (a regular here)
 
Lots of that never happened to me. I remember rations, coupons, tokens and something about shelters and we didn't have a TV until sometime later - maybe mid 50s. Nothing different at school either.
Made in the shade
Ankle-biter
Cruisin for a bruisin
Classy Chassis
Knuckle sandwich
Aug 13, 2019 02:29:59   #
Nanknit
 
For crying out loud, what a list, by crikey I remember those sayings and more.
Speaking of Police officers being called The Fuzz, my Dad and Husband were Cops and when referred to as ‘Pigs’ by the juvenile delinquents of the 50s through to the 70s, they would thank them and point out that P I G stood for Pride, Integrity and Guts. Something that Dad and DH had by the bucket load.
Strewth......we had many good memories and some not so good ones of the 50s.
Kerfuffle was another word we used.
Hells bells (and buckets of blood) was used a lot.
Gawd love a duck.
I’ve enjoyed this topic.....thanks. Jen.
Aug 13, 2019 02:41:43   #
k1p1granny (a regular here)
 
I have lovely memories of growing up in the fifties. Such simple times. Thanks.
 
Aug 13, 2019 03:13:46   #
KnitWit 54
 
I remember every one! Still use one or two now with my parents or friends of a similar or slightly older age.
Thanks for the memories.
Aug 13, 2019 03:17:48   #
ChristineM (a regular here)
 
I remember having to get under the school desk as the "grey cloud might come South from Maralinga!" I had no idea about Nuclear weapons, but my parents were appalled that Australia "allowed the POMS to blast our bloody bush! " Nuclear bombs stopped the War in Japan, but should not have been tested in our own country. I still feel that way. Len Bedell?sp, wrote a great book called Blast the Bush about those days and the roads that were made to access Maralinga.
But ..I also used words such as "he's a cool cat" or" pretty spiffy " and "fantabulous! " which would drive my family nuts with me constantly saying that! And TRAD JAZZ MAN! for music....and what about Bodgie and Widgies and Mods and Surfies. You had to belong to one of them to be Considered to be IN! ! Wow...So much to remember....
Aug 13, 2019 03:34:56   #
Nanknit
 
ChristineM wrote:
I remember having to get under the school desk as the "grey cloud might come South from Maralinga!" I had no idea about Nuclear weapons, but my parents were appalled that Australia "allowed the POMS to blast our bloody bush! " Nuclear bombs stopped the War in Japan, but should not have been tested in our own country. I still feel that way. Len Bedell?sp, wrote a great book called Blast the Bush about those days and the roads that were made to access Maralinga.
But ..I also used words such as "he's a cool cat" or" pretty spiffy " and "fantabulous! " which would drive my family nuts with me constantly saying that! And TRAD JAZZ MAN! for music....and what about Bodgie and Widgies and Mods and Surfies. You had to belong to one of them to be Considered to be IN! ! Wow...So much to remember....
I remember having to get under the school desk as ... (show quote)


My Dad was one of the first crew of Cops to man up the Anti-larrikin Squad here in Adelaide to deal with the Bodgies and Widgies. It was a tough time for me when I was in high school in the early 1960s as many of the boys from a neighboring high school had dealings with my Dad. Jen.
Aug 13, 2019 03:41:29   #
Knitted by Nan
 
ChristineM wrote:
I remember having to get under the school desk as the "grey cloud might come South from Maralinga!" I had no idea about Nuclear weapons, but my parents were appalled that Australia "allowed the POMS to blast our bloody bush! " Nuclear bombs stopped the War in Japan, but should not have been tested in our own country. I still feel that way. Len Bedell?sp, wrote a great book called Blast the Bush about those days and the roads that were made to access Maralinga.
But ..I also used words such as "he's a cool cat" or" pretty spiffy " and "fantabulous! " which would drive my family nuts with me constantly saying that! And TRAD JAZZ MAN! for music....and what about Bodgie and Widgies and Mods and Surfies. You had to belong to one of them to be Considered to be IN! ! Wow...So much to remember....
I remember having to get under the school desk as ... (show quote)


Over here in the West we did not have to dive under the desk even though the first atomic tests carried out by the UK were off our coast at the Montebello Islands. The Montebello Islands still remain a nuclear risk due to the fallout from those tests.
Aug 13, 2019 04:11:27   #
Knitted by Nan
 
Jessica-Jean wrote:
I must be strange. I found nothing at all "peaceful and comfortable" about the McCarthy Era, public service announcements on what to do in case of an atomic bomb - Duck and Cover. I wasn't feeling very comfortable during air-raid drills - crouched as small as I could make myself with a student from an older grade on all fours over me and both of us under a desk in the classroom. Creeping Communism. Spending a summer in my teens taking classes on how to survive in the basement of the house after an A-Bomb fell on NYC; I was in north central Massachusetts, Leominster to be exact. Daily newsreels (remember them?) on TV showing the 'action' in black and white in Korea, in colour in Viet-Nam. Then there was Dr. Timothy Leary and his ideas to upset what was already messed up!

Nope! The children of the fifties did not grow up in "peaceful and comfortable times", and the boys spent more time worrying about the Draft than who to take to the prom. I wouldn't go back for anything.
I must be strange. I found nothing at all "pe... (show quote)


In Australia we did. We did not have the paranoia that surrounded the McCarthy era in the US. Pig Iron Bob Menzies, our PM, tried to outlaw the Communist Party in Australia and passed a law banning it. The law was considered unconstitutional by the High Court of Australia. Menzies took the issue to a referendum in 1951, which was lost; Menzies could not outlaw the Communist Party.

We did not have air raid drills either during the war or after, despite the fact that the Australian Mainland had been bombed by the Japanese many times. The Japanese attacked Darwin 64 times and the last attack occurred in late 1943. The Japanese had occupied New Guinea, which is only rowing boat distance from Australia. We did have air raid shelters in the suburbs and in Perth CBD. We had an air raid shelter in the paddock opposite our house and I always regret that I did not disobey my mother and climb down the ladder to see what was inside. I was told it was dangerous because there could be snakes and spiders inside.

The fear in the 1950s was that the dreaded reds from Communist China would invade Australia and the nuns at the Midland Convent said that they would come thundering down the halls of our convent school, line all the children and nuns up against the wall and ask them if they would 'denounce the Lord'. When we declined to 'denounce the Lord' as all good little Catholic children would do, the Chinese soldiers would then bayonet us. I always said that I would agree with the Chinese soldiers and live; I said that I was only paying lip service to their request and my heart was sending out a different message. Yep, six of the best across the back of the hand, plus another six of the best on the other hand because I would call the nun a bloody bitch when she dished out the cane. She was a BB, built like a Sherman tank and the temper of King Kong. I soon learnt to say those words in my head; she could not hear them and she did not get to give me six of the best. This line of reasoning was not spread by the nuns of my former school, the Belmont Convent. In fact, I cannot remember any child at that school ever receiving the cane.
 
Aug 13, 2019 05:14:23   #
johannecw (a regular here)
 
Good memories! Thanks for sharing this.
Aug 13, 2019 05:15:19   #
Jessica-Jean (a regular here)
 
No canes in any of the schools I was sent to, but some of the more 'active' boys did receive thwacks across the open palm with a yard-stick. I must have been unruly a time or two, because I remember being hoisted off my chair by my pony-tail in 7th grade. That year was amazing, but not in a good way. One nun. 40 boys. 30 girls. All about 12 years old. One classroom. It was a bloody zoo! I passed the year, but I don't think I learned anything - other than to give the boys wide berth. At the year's start, I was seated near the back and on the edge of the dividing line between boys and girls. Every time the teacher turned to write something on the black board, one or more boys would whip out their metal-edged wooden rulers and slash at whoever they could reach. Not too bad for them; they all had long sleeves. I still have faint scars on my left arm from fending off those rulers! It was the parochial school associated with the parish church - a very different experience from the previous seven years (k - 6) or the succeeding two years (8 & 9) in pricey private schools.
Aug 13, 2019 05:20:51   #
Jessica-Jean (a regular here)
 
marolsh wrote:
My earliest school memory, in first grade, is of crouching under my desk during an air raid drill. We were told to turn our backs to the windows, but it was a corner room with windows on two sides, so it was impossible to find any kind of "shelter." Also, we were expected to wear our dogtags to school every day so that if we were incinerated in a nuclear attack, our remains would be identifiable. I was five, and it made a hell of an impression on me.
The dogtags!!! I hated them, because the cheap chain left a green line on my neck. I don't have them, so I must have thrown them away; I still have the broaches my grandmother had me wear to kindergarten - one a Bald Eagle with wings outspread and the other a 48-star American flag - though I haven't worn either since early childhood.
Aug 13, 2019 05:36:30   #
TNS (a regular here)
 
Jessica-Jean wrote:
I must be strange. I found nothing at all "peaceful and comfortable" about the McCarthy Era, public service announcements on what to do in case of an atomic bomb - Duck and Cover. I wasn't feeling very comfortable during air-raid drills - crouched as small as I could make myself with a student from an older grade on all fours over me and both of us under a desk in the classroom. Creeping Communism. Spending a summer in my teens taking classes on how to survive in the basement of the house after an A-Bomb fell on NYC; I was in north central Massachusetts, Leominster to be exact. Daily newsreels (remember them?) on TV showing the 'action' in black and white in Korea, in colour in Viet-Nam. Then there was Dr. Timothy Leary and his ideas to upset what was already messed up!

Nope! The children of the fifties did not grow up in "peaceful and comfortable times", and the boys spent more time worrying about the Draft than who to take to the prom. I wouldn't go back for anything.
I must be strange. I found nothing at all "pe... (show quote)


Yes, I mainly agree! In England we watched the Vietnam war at a distance but were well aware of “draft dodgers” and race riots etc. We had Ban the Bomb, Aldermaston marches and encampment, the Peace movement, then later the miners strike, the Scottish shipyards strikes and their downfall and lots of unpleasant happenings in politics.....but made the best of what we had.
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