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Spaying kitten before 4 months
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Aug 22, 2019 17:57:07   #
CarolZ
 
Lisa BB wrote:
Hi all

The shelter where I got my new calico kitten (DC Kitty) wants her spayed by 4 months and gave me a date it needs to be done by. She is 8-10 weeks now and veterinarian hubby thinks 4 months is to soon. They told me she was 10-12 weeks but when hubby checked her teeth she is only 8-10 weeks.

The 4 months can be extended by veterinarian hubby informing them that he does not do it before 6 months. I am all for getting her spayed, but not at such a young age.



In my opinion, and in the best interest of the animal, they should not be spayed/neutered before they're at least 2 years old. Their bones are not done developing and dogs especially can develop health problems. Plus, having them fixed does not improve their disposition as some people think. I have a 12 year old Yorkie/Chihuahua mix and she's never been spayed, nor has she ever had puppies. I make sure that she's not around intact males when she goes into heat, and she wears diapers in the house during this time. She's NEVER outside alone either as we have issues with hawks and coyotes.
 
Aug 22, 2019 20:50:08   #
julie windham
 
run4fittness wrote:
Just so it is before her first heat.


But sometimes that's as young as 4 months!
Aug 22, 2019 21:01:06   #
Knitting in the Rockys (a regular here)
 
CarolZ wrote:
In my opinion, and in the best interest of the animal, they should not be spayed/neutered before they're at least 2 years old. Their bones are not done developing and dogs especially can develop health problems. Plus, having them fixed does not improve their disposition as some people think. I have a 12 year old Yorkie/Chihuahua mix and she's never been spayed, nor has she ever had puppies. I make sure that she's not around intact males when she goes into heat, and she wears diapers in the house during this time. She's NEVER outside alone either as we have issues with hawks and coyotes.
In my opinion, and in the best interest of the ani... (show quote)


Are you a veterinarian and can you point to any scientific studies which prove your claims? What exact health problems are you claiming are connected to early spay?
Aug 22, 2019 21:17:02   #
vickyvet
 
Obtaining accurate statistical data about pets in the United States isn’t easy. Most of the information is based on estimates derived from surveys, and the various survey-takers don’t always agree. Data reflecting shelter/rescue animal populations is spotty due to a lack of reporting requirements, which leaders in animal welfare are aiming to address with the Shelter Animals Count project.

Number of cats and dogs entering shelters each year: 6-8 million (down from 13 million in 1973)
Of the 3 million cats and dogs euthanized in shelters each year, approximately 2.4 million (80%) are healthy and treatable and could have been adopted into new homes
Percentage of purebred dogs in shelters: 25%
Number cats and dogs adopted from shelters each year: 4 million
Percentage of cats euthanized in shelters: 70%

70% OF CATS ENTERING SHELTERS ARE EUTHANIZED.

Source:humanesociety.org
Aug 23, 2019 06:10:23   #
knittertat
 
Cats can get pregnant at 6 months. If your cat is indoor thats not a problem. You'll know when she goes in heat and you can get her done then.
Aug 23, 2019 10:29:05   #
Hazel Blumberg - McKee (a regular here)
 
CarolZ wrote:
In my opinion, and in the best interest of the animal, they should not be spayed/neutered before they're at least 2 years old. Their bones are not done developing and dogs especially can develop health problems. Plus, having them fixed does not improve their disposition as some people think. I have a 12 year old Yorkie/Chihuahua mix and she's never been spayed, nor has she ever had puppies. I make sure that she's not around intact males when she goes into heat, and she wears diapers in the house during this time. She's NEVER outside alone either as we have issues with hawks and coyotes.
In my opinion, and in the best interest of the ani... (show quote)


I have never heard or read that animals should be spayed or neutered only after they've become two years old. I've had cats in my life for over thirty years, and dogs in my life for at least twenty. I've worked for pay and volunteered at veterinary clinics (as a veterinary assistant), animal shelters, and animal rescues. Never once have I heard from any veterinarian that one should wait two years to spay or neuter an animal.

Female cats who are not spayed are much more apt to get mammary tumors--and of course, to get pregnant. Male cats who are not neutered often spray to mark their territory, and that behavior may not change after two years. Male dogs who are not neutered are apt to get testicular cancer, to wander, to impregnate any females who are in heat, to lift their leg indoors and urinate on furniture to mark their territory. Female dogs who are not spayed are also prone to mammary tumors.

Are you a veterinarian, a veterinary technician, a veterinary assistant? I am curious to find out where you obtained your view on spaying after two years of age. It is truly something I have never heard about before.

Hazel
 
Aug 23, 2019 10:39:30   #
Knitting in the Rockys (a regular here)
 
Hazel Blumberg - McKee wrote:
I have never heard or read that animals should be spayed or neutered only after they've become two years old. I've had cats in my life for over thirty years, and dogs in my life for at least twenty. I've worked for pay and volunteered at veterinary clinics (as a veterinary assistant), animal shelters, and animal rescues. Never once have I heard from any veterinarian that one should wait two years to spay or neuter an animal.

Female cats who are not spayed are much more apt to get mammary tumors--and of course, to get pregnant. Male cats who are not neutered often spray to mark their territory, and that behavior may not change after two years. Male dogs who are not neutered are apt to get testicular cancer, to wander, to impregnate any females who are in heat, to lift their leg indoors and urinate on furniture to mark their territory. Female dogs who are not spayed are also prone to mammary tumors.

Are you a veterinarian, a veterinary technician, a veterinary assistant? I am curious to find out where you obtained your view on spaying after two years of age. It is truly something I have never heard about before.

Hazel
I have never heard or read that animals should be ... (show quote)


People tend to repeat old wives tales, regardless if there is any truth to them or not. Service animals, such as seeing eye dogs are generally spay/neutered at a fairly young age. This is also true of dogs used in police work, who must be altered before they begin training.
Aug 23, 2019 10:46:55   #
kaixixang (a regular here)
 
I am not sure about blood hounds...with or without sexual altering I am sure that once correct scent has been found...good luck moving the animal OFF that trail.
Aug 23, 2019 10:57:26   #
Hazel Blumberg - McKee (a regular here)
 
Knitting in the Rockys wrote:
People tend to repeat old wives tales, regardless if there is any truth to them or not. Service animals, such as seeing eye dogs are generally spay/neutered at a fairly young age. This is also true of dogs used in police work, who must be altered before they begin training.


Thanks much for the information! I appreciate it.

Our local animal shelter performs early spays and neuters. NO animal is allowed to be adopted until he or she has been spayed or neutered. We have adopted young animals there in the past, and they had to be neutered or spayed before they left the shelter. That is the contract we signed--and completely agreed with. We have also adopted senior animals. It is amazing how many of them have never been spayed or neutered. They, too, were spayed or neutered before they could leave the animal shelter. (The only exception is for kittens who must be hand-raised. They are, of course, only a few weeks old, and hence cannot be spayed or neutered. Volunteeers and staff members take them home and hand-feed and hand-raise them until they are old enough to be adopted.)

Our shelter has veterinarians on-staff, all day, every day, which is a huge change from what the shelter was like when we first moved here. The shelter first hired one veterinarian. Now there are more than one. I'm not sure how many, but they're there, they do spays and neuters, they treat injured animals, they send animals to vet clinics for serious problems. We are all thrilled that our shelter cares so much about animal overpopulation and takes such good care of the animals in their charge.

Our pittie girl, Daphne, whom we adopted when she was about nine years old, was at the shelter for three months before we adopted her. She came in very ill, as a stray. She was treated for heartworms, pneumonia, and kennel cough while she was at the shelter. Everyone knew her and loved her. She was a staff and volunteer favorite. She was in the "gentle dog" play group, when she became well enough. (There's also a "rambunctious dog" play group.) When she was well and eligible for adoption, I went to meet her. (DH and I had contacted the shelter after our beloved Sidney, a lab/hound mix, died of very old age. We were eager to foster a dog. The shelter director then contacted us--we'd adopted from the shelter before--and asked if we might consider adopting, rather than fostering, because they had a "wonderful dog we'd like you to meet." That was Daphne.)

As I got acquainted with Daphne in the glass-enclosed meet-and-greet room, so many staff members and volunteers stopped by to say "hi" to Daphne. She knew them all, and her tail waggled wildly when she saw them. We are so grateful to the shelter for all the veterinary help that they gave our girl. And she hadn't been spayed when she came to the shelter; she had been used as a puppy factory by some "owner" who, when she got "too old," simply let her go to wander the streets. So, of course, when Daphne was well enough, the on-site veterinarians spayed her.

Hazel
Aug 23, 2019 15:24:38   #
Zelana
 
Current guidelines from Cats Protection in the UK is to spay/neuter at 4 months but many vets prefer to neuter at 6 months.
Aug 24, 2019 04:16:33   #
chooksnpinkroses (a regular here)
 
peppered wrote:
Not if you keep them inside! And why would you keep intact male unless you have cattery but then you need to have accommodations to properly take care of them anyway.

We had a cat who we decided to keep inside because we'd tried to get her to the vet for spaying, but could never keep her in the carrier long enough to shut/lock the door and actually get her to the vet... Long story short. She came into season again and never went out of season again till we managed to get her to the vet over a year later! Almost drove us crazy and likely her too.
 
Aug 24, 2019 04:22:52   #
chooksnpinkroses (a regular here)
 
Hazel Blumberg - McKee wrote:
It's happened to me before, too. I've wiped out everything in the duplicate post and figured all was well. But then both posts showed up. Sigh.

Hazel

You can edit out most of the post. You need to leave at least one letter or symbol.
Aug 24, 2019 09:40:35   #
Hazel Blumberg - McKee (a regular here)
 
chooksnpinkroses wrote:
You can edit out most of the post. You need to leave at least one letter or symbol.


Thank you so much for the tip! I definitely did not know that. Whew. I hope this'll be an end to duplicate posts I've sometimes accidentally sent.

Hazel
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