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Knitting in WWII
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May 23, 2012 00:10:53   #
maur1011
 
Silly question and off topic, but does anyone else think the man in the print ad looks like George Reeves (the original Superman)?
Superman?
Attached file:
(Download)
 
May 23, 2012 00:37:43   #
maur1011
 
Grammy Toni wrote:
If you have an opportunity to look through any old (1900's through the '40's)copies of scouting books, you would see how society has evolved! The boys did indeed do "manly" things. The girls did fantastic things back then like learning how to do all the things pioneer women needed to do. Of course many of the girls then lived in rural settings where they had to know how to manage without electrical appliances, pre-cooked or store bought foods, cooking over wood stoves or campfires, making their own soaps etc. I know many of you on this forum still do many of those things today, but many of us are "citified" and would have a struggle if we were left in the open without our cellphones at least to look things up lol! Also, it's interesting how the books were written - fine print, few pictures, no color, and the level of reading was much more advanced than the more recent ones I've seen.
And my two cents on gender mixing? I attended both in high school and I saw how much more actual learning took place in separated class rooms - especially for the boys. And if I had a little boy nowadays I think I'd want him in an all boys school, at least in his early school years, so he would be able to act like a boy and not expected to sit still for hours and not have regularly scheduled play time or at least breaks where they have to do calisthenics in between subjects to get rid of excess energy. Most girls are able to sit still for longer periods of time and most schools are geared towards them - unless there is a teacher who sees the value in the kids standing up and doing jumping jacks - if they can sneak them in between their scripted teaching. (scripted teaching - where teachers are given strict instructions on how and what they teach in strict blocks of time regardless of whether the children understand what is being taught at any given time!!!!!!)
If you have an opportunity to look through any old... (show quote)


Grammy Toni,

I went to an all-girls high school in '78-'80. It was there I discovered that I loved learning and that I could get good grades (something I failed to do in grade school). My self esteem soared and I learned that the only thing that holds us back is ourselves. (My children are tired of hearing this from me.) In my senior year, we moved and I attended a co-ed school. What a difference! But the good seed had been planted and I never looked back. I have since learned woodworking, computers, home repairs/painting, gardening, sewing, and of course, knitting. I also attended college, have a family, and have changed careers to suit as my family grows. All because I attended an all-girls school where I was never told "you can't". Sorry to be so long-winded.
May 23, 2012 09:40:45   #
Yarntherapy
 
funkyknitter wrote:
Link to picture of London cabby knitting during war.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/3475897993/


Wow, each person did their part, no matter what the skill was they had.
Even in Canada, my mother-in-law had to go to a factory to build pots and pans for the soldiers. The recruiters went from house to house to see what you were doing and if like her, you were a housewife then they gave you a job. She had to walk for almost an hour as she could not afford the bus. She started walking at 4 am so she would be at the bus which left at 5 am and got them to work by 7 am. Kids now a days complain if they have to walk for 20 min to get to school.
May 23, 2012 09:57:25   #
Lyle
 
I live in a rural area & several years ago, I went to garage sale about 10 miles away. The lady was moving in with a daughter and selling many knitted & crochet items. I bought a doily about 6"x3" which felt different. Turns out she was English born and had met a Yankee flyman stationed in England. They married and he sent her to USA to live with his parents until he returned home. Thankfully he did. Anyway the doily had been crocheted with parachute cording or whatever they call it. It cant be starched, but lies flat. When its wet it is very stiff. Her husbands unit had provided the cording from parachutes that were no longer usable as such. She and many of her relatives etc. had crocheted many items. She showed me a large bedspread, her DD kept and said she had many many doilys. I still have it in use under a picture. Also on another thread, there is a discussion about dpns and a tracing wheel. I also bought from this lady a set of 5 stainless steel dpns that are size 000. What a hoot knitting with them!!
May 23, 2012 10:57:47   #
Patty Sutter (a regular here)
 
My maternal Grandmother worked sewing parachute during the war in the Detriot area, While Grandfather served. He later became a Detroit officer. A very interesting time in history, we all pray will never be repeated.
May 23, 2012 12:48:54   #
Aud36
 
I can remember that a German bailed out and landed in a field not far from us the women rushed to the scene after he had been taken away divided up the parachute to make clothes out of it. My Mum mad me a party dress. Bliss
 
May 23, 2012 14:07:50   #
valj46
 
Aud36 wrote:
I can remember that a German bailed out and landed in a field not far from us the women rushed to the scene after he had been taken away divided up the parachute to make clothes out of it. My Mum mad me a party dress. Bliss


i had dresses made from parachute material just after the war as things were still on ration untill 19 51/52, they were blue ,a German plane crashed in our village too a family who were all women at the time as the men were away fighting hid the German after a few days sent him on his way fed & rested just hoped he made it ,they looked on it as some mothers son as the pilot was so young , not that this story has anything to do with knitting only that they might have given him warm jumpers or gloves to help him on his way
May 23, 2012 17:33:08   #
tricilicious
 
woodart wrote:
Hi girls,
(or should I say Hi Knitters as there may be a few male knitters lurking in the shadows!?)
Very interesting history of sock knitting for the troops.
Here in Australia and New Zealand our women were knitting socks, balaklavas, etc from 1914 - 1918 as the ANZACs were involved in the war in Europe from the Anzac troops landing at Gallipoli and then moved on after that conflict to fight in Europe.
Again during WW2 our mother's and female relatives also took up their knitting for socks etc for our troops fighting in Europe.
I recall helping my mother sew up hessian coverings over bags of sugar and candles which she sent to relatives in Britain because of the shortages due to the war and the depression years which followed.
Right up until the late 1960s Mum would bake two Christmas Cakes well before Christmas and one of these was carefully wrapped and then a padded hessian covering stitched over it and it would be sent off to Mum's uncle and his extended family because they were still having food rationing well into the 1950s.
Cheers
Ainslie - a transplanted Kiwi in OZ!
Hi girls, br (or should I say Hi Knitters as there... (show quote)
May 23, 2012 17:35:40   #
tricilicious
 
Ahhhh. Those parachute blouses. Almost see through. Drove the boys wild.
May 23, 2012 17:44:48   #
pattibe (a regular here)
 
valj46 wrote:
Aud36 wrote:
I can remember that a German bailed out and landed in a field not far from us the women rushed to the scene after he had been taken away divided up the parachute to make clothes out of it. My Mum mad me a party dress. Bliss


i had dresses made from parachute material just after the war as things were still on ration untill 19 51/52, they were blue ,a German plane crashed in our village too a family who were all women at the time as the men were away fighting hid the German after a few days sent him on his way fed & rested just hoped he made it ,they looked on it as some mothers son as the pilot was so young , not that this story has anything to do with knitting only that they might have given him warm jumpers or gloves to help him on his way
quote=Aud36 I can remember that a German bailed o... (show quote)


Was that before or after he dropped hi bombs on you???
May 23, 2012 18:23:50   #
mernie
 
I am fascinated with your story. I wish we could meet and you could tell me about your life then. I don't know how to express what I felt when reading this. I was also a little girl at that time.

quote=Aud36]I can remember that a German bailed out and landed in a field not far from us the women rushed to the scene after he had been taken away divided up the parachute to make clothes out of it. My Mum mad me a party dress. Bliss[/quote]
 
May 23, 2012 18:44:45   #
Knitress
 
http://www.redcross.org/museum/exhibits/knits.asp

The red cross also had knitting projects for the war.
May 23, 2012 18:56:53   #
woodart
 
Here's some interesting information about parachutes
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/systems/parachute.htm

The canopies were silk and the cords had an outer 'skin' of silk.
No wonder they were such treasures to find and were recycled!
Cheers
Ainslie.
May 24, 2012 22:22:31   #
CharleenR
 
I have several Siamese and one that is Balinese. The breeder describes the difference as have one gene"flipped". He is a big long haired furry baby - and weighs a good 18 pounds. He is a big boy and the first one to run away! Sounds a bit like Snowshoe though

It is fascinating reading these descriptions of Girl and Boy Scouts, knitting and WWII. I am a "baby boomer" so haven't experienced the rationing and other things that happened in WWII myself. I am glad you are sharing what life was like in those years. My grandfather served in WWI (lied about his age when enlisted, he was only 16) but Dad was not old enough to join up as he was only 9 at the time. My other grandfather worked in a shipyard and lost his hearing because of it.

pattibe wrote:
CharleenR wrote:
pattibe wrote:
Saki sends his best meow to your kitty. He thinks they may be related since they both live in Sunny Calif. But have ancestors from Siam.


Possibly as Chai came from a breeder in Sunland. I like Saki's name. Does he help you knit?


Saki was actually an orphan at 4 weeks so his lineage is sketchy. However, his sister, Bailey, is a purebred Snowshoe and her picture has been in the Page A Day Cat Calendar twice. Once in 2009 and again in 2011. She loves nothing nothing better than to help me wind a ball of yarn. She makes it a bit of a challenge, not to mention wet. Talk about instant felting!!!
quote=CharleenR quote=pattibe Saki sends his bes... (show quote)
May 30, 2012 15:45:08   #
CALaura
 
My Mom was still in college when WWII started, and she organized a Knittin For Britain group at Rockford. They knit all sorts of things that went to England. After she graduated, she enlisted in the SPARS, (women's branch of the Coast Guard) and had all sorts of adventures. She met my Dad in the closing days of the war, and they lived long lives. Oddly, she wasn't the one who taught me to knit, it was her mother, my Grandma, who taught me when I was six.
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