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Do NOT use acrylic or wool as they are a fire hazard in a microwave! I saw this warning on the microwave bowl pattern. What is in them that makes them a fire hazard? Acrylic becomes hard and wool leaves ash residues.
 

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And be sure if you make anything to go in the microwave that any batting and thread used is also 100% cotton. I’m not sure about wool, but acrylic would probably melt. What a mess. The wool might catch fire.
 

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Advantages to wool is that it doesn't burn until the temperature reaches approximately 575 degrees and the fiber is self-extinguishing. Yes, it leaves ash after burning but so does cotton, which will burn at approximately 255 degrees if subjected to direct flame and burns until the fiber is exhausted or externally extinguished.
 

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run4fittness said:
Would never put something like that in the microwave. Cotton only.
I put only micro-
wave safe dishes
in my microwave.
Then use potholders
to remove them. I've
burned fingers.
 

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I've heard warnings that cheap cotton yarn can contain tiny bits of metal that will create heat in a microwave. Irs extremely rare but it has happened. Don't put the items in, just use them to remove the hot things and you will be fine.
 

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I had made a bunch of bowl cozies & pot holders last year....all in cotton...with NO intent of ever putting them in the microwave....put the bowl in the microwave & then place it in the cozy....no fire hazard.
 

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Judy M said:
They are designed (slightly larger bowl-shaped hot pad) to hold the bowl in the microwave and then safely protect yourself when removing from the microwave.
??? What is there about acrylic or wool yarn that makes them a fire hazard?
is made from petro chemicals...extremely flammable....wool is just hair and of course would burn if it gets hot enough. These handy bowl holders should be made from only 'all cotton'...
 

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Firemen and women are only supposed to wear pure cotton or wool. Even earth will burn if it is hot enough.
When I'm cooking in the microwave I only ever use a pot holder to take the dish out of the microwave. I have put wheat bags in there that have cotton coverings, but you have to be careful as they can scorch and burn too.
 

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no1girl said:
why would one put them in the microwave?
Sometimes a microwave is used when dyeing yarns or fibres.
I prefer the stove-top version, so that I can see what is happening. The glass on my microwave is quite dark and makes it very difficult to see what's inside.
 

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esseike said:
Advantages to wool is that it doesn't burn until the temperature reaches approximately 575 degrees and the fiber is self-extinguishing. Yes, it leaves ash after burning but so does cotton, which will burn at approximately 255 degrees if subjected to direct flame and burns until the fiber is exhausted or externally extinguished.
Which is why, back when food was cooked over open fires, working aprons were made of wool. If a spark caught on your apron it would not erupt in flame but would just singe a small hole. And why, when knitting items for our service personnel, it is required that they be knit with wool.

I microwaved well over 200 skeins of my yarn when I had a moth infestation. 2 minutes in 30 second increments with a cup of water to add steam. The steam helps to keep the yarn and paper labels from drying out. Only had two skeins destroyed by fire. One had a metallic wound thread holding the hangtag onto the skein (zauberball), the string burned. The other had a dried dead stinkbug hiding in its folds which caught on fire. The yarn itself did not burn in either case, the area that was in contact with the burning item did singe. In both cases the yarn actually helped to extinguish the fire.
If you try this, please make sure there is no metallic ink on the label or metallic thread used in the yarn or attaching the label.
 

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Judy M said:
Do NOT use acrylic or wool as they are a fire hazard in a microwave! I saw this warning on the microwave bowl pattern. What is in them that makes them a fire hazard? Acrylic becomes hard and wool leaves ash residues.
Acrylic becomes hard and wool leaves ash residue right after they have created a fire in your microwave.....
 
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