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A friend asked me to make an afghan for her to give as a gift. I have never sold any of my items. I have no idea what a goodnprice would be. The afghan is made using 2 strands of yarn and is 50" by 40". It is very soft and cozy yarn. Anyone have any ideas for me. Thank you
 

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I would say you have to at least double or even triple cost of yarn and a bit for your time. You never get the time you put into a project. A friend wanted two pair of socks made and I charged $45.00 a pair. Never asked again. It's alot of work. I just knit for friends now.
 

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If you haven't started it yet, ask about what she wants. Simple, cabled, what size, how much she wants to spend? Most lap size afghans in acrylic (not wool) would rate at least $45. I have made the Great American Aran Afghan and the 100% wool was $130 (special price) and months of work. I wouldn't think of selling it for less than $500 and that would be cheap. If the person wants something special, they should be prepared to pay for handmade. Be sure to set the criteria and the price before you start. That is really important.
 

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Jocar6 said:
A friend asked me to make an afghan for her to give as a gift. I have never sold any of my items. I have no idea what a good price would be. The afghan is made using 2 strands of yarn and is 50" by 40". It is very soft and cozy yarn. Anyone have any ideas for me. Thank you
When a friend asks me to knit something for them, even for pay, I ask myself several questions.

1) How good a friend is this? That includes how close we are and whether she tends to be a giver or a taker.

2) How much will I enjoy/hate making this? Especially at the end, since it's an afghan. No matter how much I adore an afghan pattern, I always hate it for the last two feet. Doesn't matter whether it's 4 feet long or 10 feet long, those last two feet are murder. But maybe that's just me.

3) If there's a deadline, how does that fit my schedule? Even if I've made the pattern before, I assume the one for the friend will take at least 3 times as many hours as the other(s) I've made -- and that something major will pop up and suck time out of my life just as I need to knit. Think "have to move to a new home" interference with knitting time. I do that because finding "me time" to knit is a lot easier than finding "I promised to do this" time, even in the exact same circumstances -- "I promised" time feels like a burden/chore rather than a snatched moment of luxury/self-indulgence. That's probably because I don't feel free to choose what project I work on until the Promised Thing is done.

Once I've asked myself those questions, I know whether I'd be willing to donate my time if it came to that and say yes, or this thing will make me miserable so I say no. If I'd be willing to donate my time, I think of it as my friend paying for the yarn while I get to have fun making it and don't charge, but the friend usually insists on paying me in some way -- sometimes money (same cost as the yarn), more often by doing something for me. For example, one friend who loves to bake supplied me with breakfast pastries for every day I was working on her item (she delivered a batch every 3 or 4 days). I was spending more time knitting than she spent baking and she only gave me part of each batch she baked, so she insisted on paying for the ingredients. By the time the item was done -- about two months, it was a sweater with lots of fancy cables -- she truly appreciated the "I'm Tired Of Doing This" Factor in finishing the project! But she also loved the result and was totally content with our bargain.

And the friend always pays for the yarn, and comes with me to the yarn store to choose it and pay for it on the spot. She gets to pick the colors and decide whether the "ooooooo!" of a particular yarn is worth the price, and I'm right there to give advice. Sometimes the project gets canceled due to sticker shock because her budget doesn't match her dream, but the next time I ramble on about yarn it makes a lot more sense to her. ;-)

You'll make your own decisions, but I hope this description of how I make mine helps. And for what it's worth, knit in your friend's presence as much as possible so she gets a feel for how much work you're putting into it.
 

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Mirium
Smart lady..I agree'
Let the customer pick out the yarn and pay for it..that eliminates any "color" issues and also sets the 'foundation' for the completed cost of the project. What remains is the cost of the labor......minimum wage is a good place to start.
 

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Thanks, taiyaki! I think part of the confusion is whether making the thing is a labor of love for a friend or a commercial transaction -- a favor or something where you charge what your labor is worth. That's why the price suggestions range from $500 to free.
 

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I have a friends and family discount. I made a really big crochet blanket with fpdc & bpdc that just about did my hands and wrists in forever for my son. No charge, I even bought the yarn. His friend wanted one. I said, he buys the yarn, I get to keep the leftovers and I charge $500 and it won't be the same because I'll never do that much fpdc & bpdc again. No sale. For some people I'd ask them to buy the yarn. If I name a price and someone takes me up on it I guess I'll have to follow through and do the job.

I think someone else already asked. How good a friend?

At $500 I'd have been giving my time away I think. That was a huge blanket, weighed in at something like 5 lbs, maybe 6.
 

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Okay, how good a friend is your cousin and how much does your cousin like her friend? (Hint: if you don't feel comfortable explaining the "friends and family discount" to your cousin and asking how much she likes her friend, this is a commercial transaction. And it might chuff your cousin to learn how generous you were to her.)

And you now have this conversation to help you out -- for someone you don't know well enough to get the discount, the price is $500 plus cost of yarn. That's not your opinion, you took a poll! A GLOBAL poll of knitters! So stand in front of a mirror and make a decision, and check what your face is doing. Then make the decision the other way and check your face again. Go with the one where you're smiling. We've got your back. :-D
 
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