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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is anybody having problems with the BRIOCHE stitch? I've looked on line and in the newest Vogue kitopedia, and have tried both the klb and yo etc methods and they just don't work for me. Using #4 needles. Help! :|
 

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annihewitt said:
Is anybody having problems with the BRIOCHE stitch? I've looked on line and in the newest Vogue kitopedia, and have tried both the klb and yo etc methods and they just don't work for me. Using #4 needles. Help! :|
If you really want to learn brioche knitting, look up 'Knitting Brioche' the essential guide to the brioche stitch, by Nancy Marchant. She also has a very informative web site, just do a search on her name or book and you will be able to find her site. The book has some beautiful patterns from easy to more complicated. Working brioche stitches has it's own language. Yo's are usually part of a stitch and knitted together as one on the next row. I was intriqued by the brioche stitch and studied her book for about two to three weeks, and did 4 of the projects in the book. Each I considered a little tougher. Scarf, hat, mitts, and a cowl-caplet. I don't know where your pattern is from, but if it is from Vouge or Interweave it is most like Nancy Marchants. She is the expert on it. Just found her web site for you. www.briochestitch.com I also emailed her with a question because there is a mistake in one of the patterns in her book. She was quick to email me herself and didn't mind helping me solve the problem. She was very nice.
Good luck in learning brioche, I thought it lots of fun.
 

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Booklady38 said:
Isn't the broiche stitch the same as the fishermen's rib????
There are many different stitches. If you go to the web site for brioche stitches you would get a better idea. It is complicated in that the rules are not always the same as what they are in standard knitting, nor lace knitting. Yo's are always knitted together with a stitch. Think of it as a little jacket that a stitch wares. I belive a fishermen's rib is one result of brioche knitting. (knitting in the stitch below) That is one of the easiest, and the one you commonly see.
Increases usually are done in combination of more than one row, it is not a matter of just adding a stich at the end of a row. Like with a regualar rib (k1, p1) to stay in the pattern increasing in the middle of a row, you have to increase two stitches or your pattern is disrupted. The author and designer Nancy Marchant explains it much better than I and if you really are interested in learning this type of knitting you should go to her site, and / or invest in her book. Even though I am an experienced knitter otherwise, I am a novice with brioche knitting. It is not a technique or style that you learn over night. I studied her book and knitted 4 of her designs, one of which I got help with from Nancy herself, and now it has been a few months since I've looked at it, having knitted other things, I would have to refer to her book to be able to follow a true brioche pattern.
 

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Just got my copy of Nancy Marchants book Knitting Brioche today. Glanced through it and can tell I'll need lotsof quiet reading time before I tackle it. I'm an old dog who'll try to learna new trick, so please wish me patience with myself.
 

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I had looked at the book on the broiche stitch and thought of orering it. When I saw how much it resembled the fisherman's rib I thought there was no reason to get it. Even though I am 73 years old and have been knitting since I was a child there is still alot more to learn. I believe I will order that book also. Thank-you for taking the time to explain everything about and giving the address of the author's site.
 

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Booklady38 said:
I had looked at the book on the broiche stitch and thought of orering it. When I saw how much it resembled the fisherman's rib I thought there was no reason to get it. Even though I am 73 years old and have been knitting since I was a child there is still alot more to learn. I believe I will order that book also. Thank-you for taking the time to explain everything about and giving the address of the author's site.
I am 61 and always looking for something new to give me a challange. ( keep us 'older gals' brains working) This was a challange for me, but it was a lot of fun learning something new. I think all of you will like it. And her patterns are lovely. From small projects to some sweaters that I consider very challanging (because of the shaping) one of which I still want to try when I get some more time, when I can knit without interuptions. I have a husband who has interupted me at least 4 times while trying to write this!!
 

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Gloucester Mass is lovely, especially right on the water. My husband liked to sail and we took a few trips there. He has been gone since 1997. I live near water but it is a lake, Sebago Lake. I am originally from CT but moved here when I was in my 50s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Ah, I am sorry about your husband. Yes, Gloucester is a great place - interesting & the sailing is indeed wonderful. I live just across from City Hall and can see the harbor. I love it. We have a great yarn store, too - Coveted Yarn. they have a website, www.covetedyarn.com. Check it out. They have a knitting group every Sat. that I plan to join.
I've been knitting off and on since I was three but still consider myself a beginner, as I go for simple things - like scarf, after scarf, after scarf - loving the textures that the stitches give more than anything.
Cheers!
 
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