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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having followed a couple of KP threads recently on the joys of acrylic yarns and blocking, I thought I'd employ both in these bedsocks. Combined with turn and wrap I can truthfully say that they are one of the least successful items I have ever knitted. Although I used a Phildar yarn with a reasonable percentage of wool, acrylics just don't have the bounce of wool and the socks are quite limp after one wearing. I blocked them properly with pins both before and after sewing them up but in my opinion this made them no better than the brief ironing I invariably give to knitted woollen garments. Still, as my ironing board is set up in a window with views over distant fields and woods I was at least able to see a buzzard and a deer as I did the blocking - an advantage. As for wrap and turn (instructions religiously followed from a Revelry two needle sock pattern) - what a disappointment; nasty amateurish effect. So my New Year resolutions will be a)stick to wool and natural fibres b) just iron and forget the pins and c) follow alternative ideas for short rows.
 

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I think you're too hard on yourself. They may be limp, but they look nice. I agree, however, about the wrap and turn short rows - I also hate that process. Here's a link to a video on what I use. I hope you like it better:
 

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When blocking them, if you actually touched the socks with the iron you have killed them, and no wonder they would look and feel limp. I've blocked acrylic all my adult knitting years with out problems, and garments always look much better for it too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Leonora said:
When blocking them, if you actually touched the socks with the iron you have killed them, and no wonder they would look and feel limp. I've blocked acrylic all my adult knitting years with out problems, and garments always look much better for it too.
The limpness occurred after wearing them, and I think that it is the fault of the yarn. When blocking I used a damp towel between the iron and the socks, and avoided the ribbing/fluted frill altogether as I didn't want that to go flat. Yes, the blocking did improve the overall look of the finished acrylic item but no more so than just a light iron without the pin palaver that I use on natural fibres.
 

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Next time you block acrylic do not use a wet towel and then the iron on top, this also kills the fabric. Just hold the steam iron a couple of inches ABOVE the item and allow the steam to do the work, gently patting any crimps and creases with your finger tips.

Paula - Sussex UK said:
Leonora said:
When blocking them, if you actually touched the socks with the iron you have killed them, and no wonder they would look and feel limp. I've blocked acrylic all my adult knitting years with out problems, and garments always look much better for it too.
The limpness occurred after wearing them, and I think that it is the fault of the yarn. When blocking I used a damp towel between the iron and the socks, and avoided the ribbing/fluted frill altogether as I didn't want that to go flat. Yes, the blocking did improve the overall look of the finished acrylic item but no more so than just a light iron without the pin palaver that I use on natural fibres.
 

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Too bad you are not happy with them. I know how hard that can be but they are very pretty. I love the ruffle at the top. I just finished a scarf with ruffles and used acrylic yarn. I blocked the acrylic for the first time and I held the steam iron over the scarf about 2" away and gently smoothed with my fingers. I was very pleased with the result. It really relaxed the yarn and the ruffles.
 

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I only block sweaters very little else. Wearing socks will stretch them out. For years I never blocked much of any of my knitting may have washed it by hand and dried on a towel just gently shaping it but that is the extent of how much I block things. My mother was the same way with her knitting also.
 

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Paula - Sussex UK said:
Having followed a couple of KP threads recently on the joys of acrylic yarns and blocking, I thought I'd employ both in these bedsocks. Combined with turn and wrap I can truthfully say that they are one of the least successful items I have ever knitted. Although I used a Phildar yarn with a reasonable percentage of wool, acrylics just don't have the bounce of wool and the socks are quite limp after one wearing. I blocked them properly with pins both before and after sewing them up but in my opinion this made them no better than the brief ironing I invariably give to knitted woollen garments. Still, as my ironing board is set up in a window with views over distant fields and woods I was at least able to see a buzzard and a deer as I did the blocking - an advantage. As for wrap and turn (instructions religiously followed from a Revelry two needle sock pattern) - what a disappointment; nasty amateurish effect. So my New Year resolutions will be a)stick to wool and natural fibres b) just iron and forget the pins and c) follow alternative ideas for short rows.
The socks are awesome !!! May I ask the name or book in which the pattern may be found ? Thank you, Suze
 

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Beautiful bedsocks!!! You did a very nice job and they look nice! I like to use yarn with some wool in it but for a lot of wearing and washing in the U.S. (at least in So. California where I live) acrylic is practical.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The socks are awesome !!! May I ask the name or book in which the pattern may be found ? Thank you, Suze[/quote]

Well, it is another tweeked pattern. I started with a pattern for easy two needle socks - http://audreyknits.webs.com/easytwoneedlesocks.htm advised by a KP'er! The pattern specifies a K1P1 welt but I thought this might be a bit boring so substituted a fluted frill based on K5P2 rib casting on as many stitches as required to . get back to the 48 stitches in the main body of the sock pattern after allowing a decrease of 4 stitches per block of 5 knit stitches in the rib. The idea came from a 10 row fluted frill in Betty Barnden’s Compendium of Knitting. I got the book cheaply and recently off Amazon and recommend it highly – full of tips, hints, easy to understand text and clear photos. But as the book carries dire warnings about copyright, I can’t copy the relevant bit without possibly landing up in a nick for errant copyright infringers. I did look up “fluted frill” on the net and still hadn’t got anywhere even after three Google pages – but you might have more success. But basically, it just involves decreasing at both the sides of two rows near the top of the K5 part of the rib. I chose this ribbing so that one could either fold it back and get the fluted frill, or leave it as it was and just get a K5P2 rib effect. That was knitted in a contrasting but complementary colour as was the part of the pattern from the toe shaping. The only other adjustment was to shorten the leg length. Sorry this is not a straightforward answer to your question but that's what happens if you ask a pattern tweeker! If I can be of further help PM me and include your email address.

Finally, I suggest you try an alternative short row method than wrap and turn. Several KP'ers have provided links in this topic. Good luck!
 
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