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Irish Lori said:
What do you find to be the easiest way to change colours in your work? Thanks
Great question....I hope some of the really talented knitters we have on this forum will give you some great answers. I'm going to watch this topic because I'd also like to know :thumbup:
 

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Thanks for posting this one... I am knitting an argyle sweater and am ready to start the colour patterning so I will also be eagerly awaiting the knowledge of our wonderful knitters who have already conquered this challenge....
Karen in nova scotia
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I recently bought a book thru knit piks: Color by Kristin, written by Kristin Nicholas. It is a wonderful book, full of lots of ideas and patterns. Warning: she really LOVES color. She and several others say you just pick up the new color and start knitting with it, then weave the ends in. I would worry about the work coming undone, and I am having trouble keeping my tension the same. so I am hoping someone can gives us some guidance.
 

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Utube has allot of nice video's on knitting. There are quite a few on how to change colors in knitting.

Judy from knittingtipsbyJudy.com has a great website with lots of free knitting videos. She has been a knitter for over 50 yrs and has knit for the stars. She is so nice, she has several videos on u-tube that show lots of good techniques.


Hugs, Dusty
 

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Well, this might be the wrong answer but I always make a loop and knot the new color in when starting it.I know the "Proper" techniques say just start with it - never trusted that ! If making something that changes colors a lot I use yarn bobins to put new colors on and let them hang at th back of the piece - its easier to work with other than a big ball or skein. If you're using stripes of colors that changes wihthin a few rows I carry the both colors along the edge which, in some cases, bulks up the final seam but keeps it neat without long loops . Whatever method you use don't be afrid of color/color changes it makes things so much more fun to add the variety.
 

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If u google changing colors youll get plenty of sites. theres one that will show u how 2 carry yarn alone while knitting in stead of carrying up the side and bulk up. shes in Calf.i can tell you her method works. good luck. GY
 

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Lori,
Changing color depends on what method of knitting you are doing.

So, the logical questions are: How are you changing color? Is it stripes? If so, the number of rows of each stripe? Is it Fair Isle or Norwegian? How about Intarsia?
 

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lots of great ideas, Ladies. I try to stay away from patterns with changing colors alot because it seems like it would be a tangled mess. Yet, I want to do something with a pic pattern in it. Guess I'm just going to have to get over my fear and try it with the bobbins (after I watch the video, of course).
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So far, I've just been changing colour on scarves, hats, and a prayer shawl. I'll confess that I just tied a small, hard, tight knot when I changed colour, weaved the ends in, and went on my merry way. Seemed to work very well, then I got hung up on the "Proper" way of doing it. I'll check out the video's, although I really like written instructions that I can have right under my nose. DeeDee, what is a yarn bobbin?? I have not heard that term before.
thanks everybody for your great ideas and suggestions. Knitting Paradise Rocks!
 

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At a talk in Sydney several years ago, Kaffe Fassett said NOT to use those bobbins. Just estimate how much of each yarn you need,and let the yarns just dangle. If they bunch up, it is easy to just pull each each one out until they are all nice and straight.

Stripes - for narrow stripes, carry the one not being used up a side seam. If there are more than 2 colours, start one (or two) at the OTHE end of the row.
You will need DPN or circular to do this. Less bunching up of waiting yarn at the seam

Grosvenor
 

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Also (following on my previous item, just above )

Tie each new colour in with enough of a tail to work that excess in after the work is finished. Just a small knot is enough


Grosvenor
 

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I knit or crochet the new color into the last stitch. For example; when knitting I will start the stitch with the old color and finish with the new. In crocheting I will bring up the loop on the last stitch then finish with the new color. It kind of locks the new thread in and I will usually weave those ends in right away.
 

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grosvenor said:
At a talk in Sydney several years ago, Kaffe Fassett said NOT to use those bobbins. Just estimate how much of each yarn you need,and let the yarns just dangle. If they bunch up, it is easy to just pull each each one out until they are all nice and straight.

Stripes - for narrow stripes, carry the one not being used up a side seam. If there are more than 2 colours, start one (or two) at the OTHE end of the row.
You will need DPN or circular to do this. Less bunching up of waiting yarn at the seam

Grosvenor
kaffe (i call him kaffe) also says to knit both ends in for the first 3 or 4 sts and avoid weaving in.....since he uses tons of colors in one item and the overall color impression is the point of his designs, i can see where that would work for him but maybe not for us mortals who only use 2 or 3 colors and the joins would be more noticeable...however, it is good to know it's perfectly safe to do so and naturally, i am willing to try anything kaffe says....am planning a scarf now with one of his great intarsia patterns (crying virgins, sleeping virgins???) just on the two ends...my first real intarsia...but hey, if you're gonna do it, start at the top!!!!!
 

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In response to changing yarn--As I'm new to this forum I have not gone to these other sites but I will tell you how we did it at our shop. As knots are hard to hide I take a length appx 4" of the ending and appx 4" of new yarn --open up the plies {3 or 4} whatever weight you are using. Then I lay the length together and twist each one and twist the plies together so you now have just the one length and knit as you were and you will be weaving 3or4 sts into the row just as if it was the strand . No knots --No worry about not being secure as you have several sts knitted tog and No weaving in added yarn. You do that by the twisting tog. I hope this helps---Gloria
 

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Vogue Knitting Quick Reference gives great explanations and pictures of methods of changing colors. The method varies depending on the type of knitting you are using -- Fair Isle, Intarsia, horizontal stripes or vertical stripes. The one I have used the most is for horizontal stripes where you change colors along the side. You simply drop the old color, bring the new color under the old color, and knit the next stripe. Easy.
This book has saved my bacon numerous times as it covers everything from basic techniques, correcting errors, design and embellishments, tools, etc. It is published by the editors of Vogue Knitting Magazine. Hope this helps.
 

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I just remembered, there is another method of joining yarns which is great, whether you are changing colors or just adding another skein. It's called the Russian Join and you can view it at this website:
If this website is not still running, you could just google Russian Join and I'm sure there will be others. This method avoids having to weave in loose ends.
 
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