Knitting and Crochet Forum banner
  • Wondering how to use different site features? Please visit our FAQ. Still have questions? Post to our Community Help section for a speedy response.
1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last year I started blocking everything, when in my previous fifty years of knitting I had blocked nothing. Frankly, I can't tell the difference. My method is to pin the piece on a blocking board and spray heavily with water, let dry.

I now have a sweater that is my worst piece of knitting but my daughter insists I should not frog and redo. She paid for the yarn, a gorgeous silver-flecked blue wool. I have other projects to do for her and she is anxious for them. She is more forgiving than I am, but I didn't catch the ladder and other glitches until I was finished. Too much knitting while watching TV I think. So I am hoping blocking might smooth out some of the rough patches.

My question is, would it be better to soak and completely wet the sweater--which I've never done, or would spraying with water accomplish the same thing. The fit is perfect--it's a tight-fitting pullover, so I don't want it stretched.

Many thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,064 Posts
I always soak mine about 20 mins.Some yarns don't soak it up when I spray.And then I blot in towel and then lay it out and pat it down ,not stretch it.I know some steam them ,I don't have one of those ,but it is on my list. Hope this helps. Good luck.
P.S. I doubt your D. will notice your mistakes we tend to be more critical of our work!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,778 Posts
The most important thing to consider when blocking is fiber type. IF you are pinning and misting an acrylic or mostly acrylic yarn, when dry... It will simply bounce right back... You won't ever notice a difference because acrylic is plastic, doesn't absorb water, and can only be blocked with heat.

To properly advise you on THIS piece, we would know the type of fiber you used..... You say it is s flecked wool, but many knitters refer to all yarns as wool. If it is wool, you can wet block as above and you will notice a huge difference in your work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The yarn is Glisten by Kollage, which I've loved working with. Content is 70% alpaca, 25% silk, 5% Estelline. I can't find a definition, maybe it's synthetic.

I'm only interested in blocking to smooth out the yarn.

AmyKnits said:
The most important thing to consider when blocking is fiber type. IF you are pinning and misting an acrylic or mostly acrylic yarn, when dry... It will simply bounce right back... You won't ever notice a difference because acrylic is plastic, doesn't absorb water, and can only be blocked with heat.

To properly advise you on THIS piece, we would know the type of fiber you used.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,155 Posts
I haven't dipped any of my garments in water. I pin them out on my blocking board and lay a damp towel over them. Leave until towel is dry. I sort of pat the towel down so it is touching all of the item.
That is one of the safer methods.
If I don't think they need that much blocking, I just steam them light on the wrong side This is how I did my Wingspans.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,778 Posts
That does sound like a beautiful wool... and it is a natural fiber so it will respond to wet blocking. Alpaca is a very soft yarn and blocks VERY easily. Now that we know what your fiber is, we can recommend the best method for blocking....

Alpaca will felt, so it is NOT machine washable.

I would recommending blocking as Joy Marshall has described... either the wet towel or light steam method is the way to go with your piece. I don't "dunk" my knits either....

You can lightly steam block your sweater by using a few bursts from your steam iron held 6-8 inches above your work and smooth the stitches with your hand as you go. I like to use steam because you can easily see what you are doing and how much you need to block.... better control.

You should notice the stitches lying more evenly. Let us know how you make out!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,227 Posts
Here's a great article written by an expert with the low down on how to block which fibers and why.

http://www.knitty.com/ISSUEwinter02/FEATdiyknitter.html

When in doubt - knit a swatch with the yarn and experiment with it and see what happens. Treat it the way you would like to when it is being worn/used. Wash it, block it, put it in the washer and dryer - at the very least you will find out if it shrinks, how much it shrinks, if it can be blocked back to original size, and if it gets ruined you will certainly know what not to do!

As an aside, applying too much heat to acrylic yarn will "kill" it and it will lose all it's elasticity, but sometimes that can be a desired effect as it becomes very soft and pliable - like a hand woven fabric. Again - make a separate swatch and "kill" it and judge for yourself whether you like that effect or if it is appropriate for your project.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes, those two photos illustrate my problem and the solution I'm looking for. Thank you so much. I'll google Joy Marshall. I don't know that name.
AmyKnits said:
That does sound like a beautiful wool... and it is a natural fiber so it will respond to wet blocking. Alpaca is a very soft yarn and blocks VERY easily.

I would recommending blocking as Joy Marshall has described. I don't "dunk" my knits either.... You could also use a few bursts from your steam iron held 6-8 inches above your work and smooth the stitches with your hand as you go.

You should notice the stitches lying more evenly. Let us know how you make out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Oh, I see. Joy is on the forum. Many thanks. going to block now (that's the way I usually do it) and will photograph the result.

Bulkarn said:
Yes, those two photos illustrate my problem and the solution I'm looking for. Thank you so much. I'll google Joy Marshall. I don't know that name.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,778 Posts
jenk said:
I too am trying to block for the first time and it is 80% acrylic, so that's why it won't lay flat! I'll steam it carefully
and see how that works. Thanks,
Steam is a great way to block acrylic items. I described the method I use above. Acrylic is a different animal, though and will need more steam to do the job.... again... give the item a GOOD amount of steam with your iron and smooth and pin to get that bugger to stay in shape.

The bonus of steam blocking acrylics is that it will STAY blocked through washings!

You should feel very comfortable steaming acrylic... you cannot "oversteam" acrylic..... it is very sturdy. The only way you will encounter a problem is if you TOUCH the iron to the piece of knitting.... you will most likely damage ANY fiber if you touch the fabric to the knitting! LOL

I have steam blocked literally hundreds of pieces of knitting and have never "accidentally" ruined anything.... AND I am the clumsiest person on the planet! Giggle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
And the most prolific. I can't imagine knitting hundreds of items. Or any number close to that.
AmyKnits said:
Steam is a great way to block acrylic items. I described the method I use above. Acrylic is a different animal, though and will need more steam to do the job.... again... give the item a GOOD amount of steam with your iron and smooth and pin to get that bugger to stay in shape.

The bonus of steam blocking acrylics is that it will STAY blocked through washings!

You should feel very comfortable steaming acrylic... you cannot "oversteam" acrylic..... it is very sturdy. The only way you will encounter a problem is if you TOUCH the iron to the piece of knitting.... you will most likely damage ANY fiber if you touch the fabric to the knitting! LOL

I have steam blocked literally hundreds of pieces of knitting and have never "accidentally" ruined anything.... AND I am the clumsiest person on the planet! Giggle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
656 Posts
AmyKnits said:
That does sound like a beautiful wool... and it is a natural fiber so it will respond to wet blocking. Alpaca is a very soft yarn and blocks VERY easily. Now that we know what your fiber is, we can recommend the best method for blocking....

Alpaca will felt, so it is NOT machine washable.

I would recommending blocking as Joy Marshall has described... either the wet towel or light steam method is the way to go with your piece. I don't "dunk" my knits either....

You can lightly steam block your sweater by using a few bursts from your steam iron held 6-8 inches above your work and smooth the stitches with your hand as you go. I like to use steam because you can easily see what you are doing and how much you need to block.... better control.

You should notice the stitches lying more evenly. Let us know how you make out!
I have noticed your expression "top-down" in several patterns I have looked at. What does it mean?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,778 Posts
Nittin Pearl said:
I have noticed your expression "top-down" in several patterns I have looked at. What does it mean?
Hi Nittin Pearl. Top-down is a type of construction. It can refer to MANY types of knitted items..... however, most often it is a sweater that is knitted in one piece, from the neck down... The sleeves are usually knitted directly onto "held" stitches.... So it is essentially knitted as one continual piece. Also called "seamless" sweaters.

It is my favorite type of sweater to knit because there is no sewing. When the sweater is finished you are done. You also have the opportunity to try on a top-down sweater AS you are knitting it.... great for adjusting size!

Here is a link to a great, basic top-down sweater that I knitted... it was easy to knit and wear because it is similar to a sweatshirt in style.

Have a look... In my post there is a link to the free pattern!

http://www.knittingparadise.com/t-138374-1.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
As a matter of fact, my sweater is top down. My favorite way to knit a sweater.
AmyKnits said:
Hi Nittin Pearl. Top-down is a type of construction. It can refer to MANY types of knitted items..... however, most often it is a sweater that is knitted in one piece, from the neck down... The sleeves are usually knitted directly onto "held" stitches.... So it is essentially knitted as one continual piece. Also called "seamless" sweaters.

It is my favorite type of sweater to knit because there is no sewing. When the sweater is finished you are done. You also have the opportunity to try on a top-down sweater AS you are knitting it.... great for adjusting size!

Here is a link to a great, basic top-down sweater that I knitted... it was easy to knit and wear because it is similar to a sweatshirt in style.

Have a look... In my post there is a link to the free pattern!

http://www.knittingparadise.com/t-138374-1.html
 

Attachments

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,778 Posts
I love yours, bulkarn!!!! Thanks so much for adding a photo! It is beautiful and JUST my style.... Not too fancy and easy to wear.... But I bet it is luxurious feeling in that alpaca!!!

You made it sound like it was a "hot mess" and you were hoping to salvage it to SOME extent by blocking! You are a little fibber, missy! Beautiful job!!

Of course, now that I know the yarn you used... I am going to HAVE to ask for the name of that pattern, lady!

Your daughter is a very lucky lady!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Amy, coming from you it's a compliment. I looked at your pictures. The problem stitches don't show up on this picture. When I set it up for before and after blocking pix you'll see what I mean. My daughter found the sweater on Ravelry made a designer not in the books. She sent me the pattern. If you want it, give me your email or tell me how to send a private pattern to you. It is super easy and fits Allison like a charm. She has the body for it. But stockinette is not my best stitch. It shows my mistakes. cables? Then I'm your girl. If you are on Ravelry I'm bulkarn. You can the sweater on her. This is the 4th one I've made. She loves it and wears it like a t-shirt.

AmyKnits said:
I love yours, bulkarn!!!! Thanks so much for adding a photo! It is beautiful and JUST my style.... Not too fancy and easy to wear.... But I bet it is luxurious feeling in that alpaca!!!

You made it sound like it was a "hot mess" and you were hoping to salvage it to SOME extent by blocking! You are a little fibber, missy! Beautiful job!!

Of course, now that I know the yarn you used... I am going to HAVE to ask for the name of that pattern, lady!

Your daughter is a very lucky lady!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,205 Posts
Bulkarn said:
Last year I started blocking everything, when in my previous fifty years of knitting I had blocked nothing. Frankly, I can't tell the difference. My method is to pin the piece on a blocking board and spray heavily with water, let dry.

I now have a sweater that is my worst piece of knitting but my daughter insists I should not frog and redo. She paid for the yarn, a gorgeous silver-flecked blue wool. I have other projects to do for her and she is anxious for them. She is more forgiving than I am, but I didn't catch the ladder and other glitches until I was finished. Too much knitting while watching TV I think. So I am hoping blocking might smooth out some of the rough patches.

My question is, would it be better to soak and completely wet the sweater--which I've never done, or would spraying with water accomplish the same thing. The fit is perfect--it's a tight-fitting pullover, so I don't want it stretched.

Many thanks.
Always soak wool 30 minutes in water w/light soap. Then block. It makes a huge difference in smoothing stitches
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top Bottom