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Cable length

2764 Views 71 Replies 31 Participants Last post by  Jessica-Jean
For those who knit in the round in circular needles (NOT for Magic Loop), do you prefer to use a cable length that is just shorter than the circumference of your work or a lot shorter? I know it's a matter of personal preference, what makes me ask is that a test designer is requiring that we be able to create a needle that is 180" long for an adult dress, suggesting that testers purchase additional cables and connectors. While I could do that, I have absolutely no intention to. I prefer to use the shortest cable that will accommodate the stitches without forcing them off the tips so that the fabric pretty much pushes itself across the cable.
So what's your preference? As long as possible or as short as practical?
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Kids. The things we let them get away with even when they're grown. 馃ぃ
Yep, she's wound up with a lot of things I made for myself. It's my own fault, I created a monster when she and her brother were little. I had what my daughter called the "Grandma's sweater club". From the time they were each about 3 or 4 I would show them patterns to pick their favorite as well as the yarn color. My nephew got added into the club and then my "I don't really wear sweaters" husband asked to join as well.
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Bunched up, OR multiple circulars NOT joined, but used as one uses double pointed needles. That鈥檚 how I did this:
Thank you for this suggestion. Although I've been knitting for years I have never been able to grasp knitting in the round, using the magic loop or using dpns. Can't wait to try this method!!!
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E
I prefer to use the shortest cable that will accommodate the stitches. I use a 24 or 32 inch circular needle for most knitting.
Using cables joined with the possibility of them coming undone--no way.
Elizabeth Zimmerman loved circular needles, and she used 24-inch cords for almost everything. So do I.
E


Elizabeth Zimmerman loved circular needles, and she used 24-inch cords for almost everything. So do I.
Yes, but she also used thinner wool yarn than those of us who use worsted weight acrylics.
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A circular knitting needle of length 180 inches (15 feet) sounds just plain wrong. 180 cm (71 inches) maybe. Are my calculations correct? I鈥檝e had a glass of wine.

My favourite length of circular needle is 32鈥. There are occasions to use longer or shorter but that鈥檚 my go-to.
180 inches is huge indeed. while 180 cms is still big it is an adult sun dress so the skirt could be very big and require a lot of length for the cable (though you can fit a lot width not he needles than the cable length and 180cms (Yes around 71 inches) would take likely three times that in knitting width so a massive bottom of the skirt. I would take the length as a recommendation rather than a prerequisite. Yarn weight and gauge must be right but the cable length not. But if that really is the size needed I sure wouldn't be knitting it! even if I had considered it.
I have no idea either but lately I've encountered more tests where the designer will specify so many things. It used to be that they would give suggestions but say, "or your preferred method" for cast on and bind off, except when a special one like I-cord or tubular was part of the design .I've even seen ones that want some to use circular needles and some to use dpns, there was one where the designer specified Magic Loop only.
If it doesn't make a difference to the final piece or checking the pattern for correctness why should they care?
On the other hand, I also test for some of the nicest designers who give a lot of leeway in the testing. That makes so much more sense since the more options you can display for a potential buyer the more patterns you will sell, IMHO.
If they tell how to divide up the stitches on the needle and/or number the needles etc then it could be important to use the method said. You need to check that the pattern works for the way it is written, not the way you want to knit it. For example if the pattern has needles numbered 1-4 then you need 4 needles (or divided into four with markers) so you can be sure that has the correct number of stitches on each needle.

Of course if you are simply following a pattern rather than doing test knit you are free to use whichever method you want.
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If they tell how to divide up the stitches on the needle and/or number the needles etc then it could be important to use the method said. You need to check that the pattern works for the way it is written, not the way you want to knit it. For example if the pattern has needles numbered 1-4 then you need 4 needles (or divided into four with markers) so you can be sure that has the correct number of stitches on each needle.

Of course if you are simply following a pattern rather than doing test knit you are free to use whichever method you want.
When I do a pattern for dpn on a circ I use markers to indicate the end of the stitches on a needle. I'd still do the pattern the way I prefer. It would be my silent rebellion against trying to control my knitting. :p
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Yes, but she also used thinner wool yarn than those of us who use worsted weight acrylics.
I also like thinner wool than worsted.
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Like many have said, I prefer the cable to be a bit on the shorter side. Can't imagine what one would do with a 15 foot cable :oops:
Like many have said, I prefer the cable to be a bit on the shorter side. Can't imagine what one would do with a 15 foot cable :oops:
Go crazy!!
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When I do a pattern for dpn on a circ I use markers to indicate the end of the stitches on a needle. I'd still do the pattern the way I prefer. It would be my silent rebellion against trying to control my knitting. :p
And that would work and still enable you to do the pattern as it is written.
But it seems to me that if you are doing a test knit you need to be prepared to have your knitting controlled. You can't just change something in the pattern if you want to and so you are being controlled. You can't adjust to in the round or flat because you prefer it that way so you are being controlled.
So unless like using markers to mark needles rather than using DPNs (which is what I would do as well as it is effectively using DPNs as you can still have needles numbered and I don't like DPNs either) you need to follow the pattern exactly as written. And cable length would fit this category, using a smaller length as long as can still follow the pattern exactly it won't matter. And indeed it would be one of the points you would make to the designer that the cable length seems to be far too long.

Of course if you are following a pattern rather than doing a test knit then how closely you stick to the pattern is totally up to you.
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And that would work and still enable you to do the pattern as it is written.
But it seems to me that if you are doing a test knit you need to be prepared to have your knitting controlled. You can't just change something in the pattern if you want to and so you are being controlled. You can't adjust to in the round or flat because you prefer it that way so you are being controlled.
So unless like using markers to mark needles rather than using DPNs (which is what I would do as well as it is effectively using DPNs as you can still have needles numbered and I don't like DPNs either) you need to follow the pattern exactly as written. And cable length would fit this category, using a smaller length as long as can still follow the pattern exactly it won't matter. And indeed it would be one of the points you would make to the designer that the cable length seems to be far too long.

Of course if you are following a pattern rather than doing a test knit then how closely you stick to the pattern is totally up to you.
I鈥檝e begun my first official test knit. On my Ravelry projet page, I鈥檓 making notes to myself of tiny details I think I would prefer, when/if I make it again. Other than that, I鈥檓 sticking to the pattern, which isn鈥檛 hard, because it鈥檚 charted.
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I鈥檝e begun my first official test knit. On my Ravelry projet page, I鈥檓 making notes to myself of tiny details I think I would prefer, when/if I make it again. Other than that, I鈥檓 sticking to the pattern, which isn鈥檛 hard, because it鈥檚 charted.
Is that the cape you commented on or something else?
Is that the cape you commented on or something else?
Yes, the becabled cape!
Yes, the becabled cape!
So you gave in and did it. I resisted tempered as I was. Not the same need for them down here either. A cold winters night will get to around 0C and maximum under 10 is a really cold day.
Hope you enjoy doing it. Will be interested to see it as it progresses. At least it can't add to your UFOs as you have to finish it :)
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So you gave in and did it. I resisted tempered as I was. Not the same need for them down here either. A cold winters night will get to around 0C and maximum under 10 is a really cold day.
Hope you enjoy doing it. Will be interested to see it as it progresses. At least it can't add to your UFOs as you have to finish it :)
From your mouth to God鈥檚 ears!!!
My collection of unfinished objects is bigger than any 77 year old should have!!! I just hope I鈥檓 able to finish it before the deadline. So far, it鈥檚 not a take-everywhere project. That means it sits waiting too much.
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From your mouth to God鈥檚 ears!!!
My collection of unfinished objects is bigger than any 77 year old should have!!! I just hope I鈥檓 able to finish it before the deadline. So far, it鈥檚 not a take-everywhere project. That means it sits waiting too much.
Why I decided to be smart and not do it. Clearly not one that can be done out and about or while sitting at the computer.
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When I do a pattern for dpn on a circ I use markers to indicate the end of the stitches on a needle. I'd still do the pattern the way I prefer. It would be my silent rebellion against trying to control my knitting. :p
I have to agree with you. I prefer to do ALL my knitting with 40" circs, no matter what the pattern says. I also use stitch markers (a lot!) to mark specific points along the row. It is MY knitting, after all!
I have to agree with you. I prefer to do ALL my knitting with 40" circs, no matter what the pattern says. I also use stitch markers (a lot!) to mark specific points along the row. It is MY knitting, after all!
I'm the opposite, I use as few stitch markers as possible, BOR and raglan placement and markers for future needs but almost never for repeats. On larger projects though, I frequently mark my first stitch of the day so that I can keep track of my daily progress.
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Yes, but she also used thinner wool yarn than those of us who use worsted weight acrylics.
I have various lengths for the purposes for which they were intended. I refuse to use a 40/46" length for magic loop to only get face slapped with the excess cord loop; or the excess cord length get in the way of my working progress. Each side of the magic loop will only have 4-6" cord looped and I have never had a problem. I use my 24" or 29" for baby/child hats, sweaters. I use my 29" for adult hats for magic loop. Any of my other more lengthy needles are used for circular knitting of adult sweaters, blankets and shawls.

46" length needle is the longest I have in my toolbox. I will be darned if I need to special order or makeshift a really long needle just for one demanding test knit. If I need one longer than the 46" (as in a shawl I once did), I used different lengths to my end result, just let the tips hang.
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