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Ok, so I've seen (not just on here, but lots of places) folks talking about how using knitting machines are easier. What I'm wondering is if you use a machine, how can you call your work hand-crafted?
I'm only asking because at a few craft fairs I've been to I've seen folks who claim hand-crafted, but who use machines. Obviously, the machines allow you to make more items faster. But are they truly the same quality as something made the old fashioned way?

Please note: I am NOT looking to start an argument over which way is "better" or anything like that!!! Also, I would appreciate it if comments were kept to the list and not directed to my private messages. That way everyone can see what others are saying, and hopefully folks will have to play nice. :)
((That said: I'm going to state right now - if you DO choose to send me a private message I WILL post it for the rest of the list to see if regarding this subject.))
 

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LOL! Squirrelcat, I think you have asked a question that has been around ever since the beginning of 'change' - or at least machinery/technology. I volunteer with senior citizens; you should see all the improvision and ingenuity going on. I contiually say to them 'Whatever works for you'. Fingerpaint - paintbrush, needle & thread - sewing machine, pony express - Fed-X. I guess we can just celebrate each other and our huge array of talent and creativity. : D ~ Grace
 

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This is a interesting question, aside from a debate that has gone on since knitting began I think. This is of course my opinion and I take all responsibility for it :p

If hand crafted knitting defines itself as the process of using one's hands to create something out of yarn, I think using a machine to knit would still fit the bill. Before the knitting can begin one has to create the design (or study the pattern), just like in hand knitting. Then gauge swatches have to be made, both in row and stitch and a fair amount of calculating has to be done.

Then you have to load your machine, depending on the design of the pattern. This can, and normally does, require some hands on work. Granted the carriage does the knitting (or forming of stitches) but the operator has to keep an eye on things to assure none of the stitches decide to hop off and run down to visit buddies 8 rows below. You have to hand manipulate your increases and decreases and in most cases anything that is not stk - which takes time and patience.

The plus side is the speed at which a carriage can knit a row of stitches. This allows one to enjoy a finished garment much quicker than a hand knitter would. The same pride goes into it because the effort was there, just in a different way. Oh - another plus is machine knitted stitches are apt to be (in many cases) more even and uniform but I always thought this was a good thing.

I've done both and have to admit, I'm hooked on hand knitting right now and haven't used my machines in a long time but... I will get back to them one day I'm sure. I have to say that you see because they are both in this room ... looking at me !
 

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I bought a knitting machine several years ago and it was a lot of fun learning to knit with it. (I've been knitting for more than 40 years in the traditional way - with needles). I made quite a few prayer shawls to donate but didn't find that I had the same satisfaction finishing those projects as I do when I hand knit. I rarely use the knitting machine now, probably because my table is too short and it hurts my back to have to bend and do it. Sitting works okay but also takes its toll on my shoulders. So, which do I prefer? Hand knitting. Will I ever machine knit again? Of course.
 

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I have to agree that it's a fair question...I have to quote somebody's response that I read recently (maybe even on this site) A knitting machine without hands to manipulate it is nothing more than a dust catcher. I like them simply because I prefer the designing aspect more than the act of knitting...I just don't have the patience to wait days or weeks to see the finished product. Plus a 1 yr old, 3 yr old and 5 yr old keep me pretty busy! I wouldn't finish a project until they were in college!! = ) I shouldn't say that...I do still enjoy hats ans scarves by hand...small enough to finish quickly!
Julie
 

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my answer is....i don't call it 'hand knittied'....but i consider hand and machine knitting to be two different hobbies, even tho i frequently mix the two together....i don't enjoy fiddling with a ribber...so i hand knit my ribs, hang them on the machine and knit the rest of the piece....even worse (in some people's eyes), i hang the hand knit rib, machine knit the width of the piece for about a yard....and then remove from machine, block, and lay my t-shirt patterns down and cut and sew up on my sewing machine or serger.....no wrong way to knit NWW2K!!!!!
 

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deemail said:
my answer is....i don't call it 'hand knittied'....but i consider hand and machine knitting to be two different hobbies, even tho i frequently mix the two together....i don't enjoy fiddling with a ribber...so i hand knit my ribs, hang them on the machine and knit the rest of the piece....even worse (in some people's eyes), i hang the hand knit rib, machine knit the width of the piece for about a yard....and then remove from machine, block, and lay my t-shirt patterns down and cut and sew up on my sewing machine or serger.....no wrong way to knit NWW2K!!!!!
Yep - I'd call it homemade rather than handmade! Plus...unless you're making a flat panel piece, there's bound to be some hand finishing (or sewing machine as you said) is using a sewing machine not considered sewing?
 
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