Knitting and Crochet Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,306 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have a dying friend, whom I haven't been to see yet, in a hospice. He and my husband will chat; I thought I'd take a little project, like a sock, to work on. But I keep getting the image of Madame Defarge in my head.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,210 Posts
Moe C said:
We have a dying friend, whom I haven't been to see yet, in a hospice. He and my husband will chat; I thought I'd take a little project, like a sock, to work on. But I keep getting the image of Madame Defarge in my head.
That's what all my relatives and close friends call me, Mme Defarge, since I take knitting with me EVERYwhere, and I'm also French Canadian!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,303 Posts
Tale of Two Cities....what a great old film. Maybe they have it on Netflix and you could watch again. I can't recall how she knitted.sorry for your friend. We just lost a long-time friend as well. It's sad and hard to deal with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,033 Posts
I'm very sorry about your friend.
I always take crochet or cross stitch with me when visiting in a hospital. My dad was in several times, and I wasn't about to pop in and then leave after a few minutes. I would tell him to nap and I'd still be there when he woke up. It seemed to comfort him. When my uncle was in the hospital, after the initial hello and how are you's, he commented to the rest of his visitors 'And of course, Susie has brought her project along'. But he smiled when he said it, and I know he was not annoyed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,608 Posts
My father used to call me Madame Defarge when he came into my room and found me sitting up in bed knitting.

Remember she used it to keep a record of who should be condemned to death. I've spent quite a few idle minutes wondering what kind of code she used and how she stored all that knitting! She couldn't have given it away or washed it much. It also can't have been spelling out people's names.

Any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,682 Posts
MindyT said:
Tale of Two Cities....what a great old film. Maybe they have it on Netflix and you could watch again. I can't recall how she knitted.sorry for your friend. We just lost a long-time friend as well. It's sad and hard to deal with.
I've yet to see any version on screen that comes even the slightest bit close to the book - so much in the book has been axed from all the films and TV serials; Les Miserables being another one a hatchet job has been done on.
As for Dickens I don't believe he mentioned the knitting style, only explained how she knitted the names of the traitors (Royalists) into the scarf.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,795 Posts
I think having you there, doing something so normal & peaceful, would be a bit of comfort. After all, Madame DeFarge had a blood thirsty crowd around her. Those stitches are prayers for your friend & his family. Sort of like a rosary meditation. And you could always ask him if it bothers him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,303 Posts
tatsfieldknitter said:
I've yet to see any version on screen that comes even the slightest bit close to the book - so much in the book has been axed from all the films and TV serials; Les Miserables being another one a hatchet job has been done on.
As for Dickens I don't believe he mentioned the knitting style, only explained how she knitted the names of the traitors (Royalists) into the scarf.
Totally true. The books were ever so much better, but the movies were well done in black and white, and told of the oppression of the regular people as opposed to the ruling class perfectly natural during the 1930's and 40's to do "morality" stories. I believe you are correct, he didn't mention knitting style, but that she knitted in the royalists...maybe used a family crest..and it would have been continental knitting, no? As it was France.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,734 Posts
Saying prayers for your friend. It is very kind of you & your husband to be there for him. Bless you.

Read a Tale of Two Cities when I was twelve & also saw the old black & white film. I'd have to guess that she knit Continental as many European women do. I've read before how she knitted in some kind of code similar to what we now know as Morse code. I think someone once posted a video regarding 'Morse code knitting'. Here is an article on communicating through textiles that mentions Madame DeFarge at the bottom of the last paragraph in the link below. Googled 'knitting in Morse code' & found more info. on this & also several patterns. Thought it was rather interesting.

https://wavefarm.org/ta/works/s15jqy

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=knitting+in+morse+code
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,135 Posts
If Madame were real, I'm sure she would have knitted Continental. In the movies, however, I bet (but don't know for sure) that she knits English, because that's the "stereotype", and what the (American or English) filmmakers remember their relatives doing.

Enjoy your day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,551 Posts
Prayers for your friend, and yes, I am called MMe DeFarge as well!! Too funny...she probably DID knit continental!! HUGS...GG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
665 Posts
That's my nickname! Not everyone 'gets it' though, only those who are familiar with Charles Dickens' "A Tale of Two Cities". Funny! Don't know if she knitted continental or not and not quite sure if I appreciate the association at all! After all, she knitted while the French aristocrats were being guillotined.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,194 Posts
smasha12 said:
Remember she used it to keep a record of who should be condemned to death. I've spent quite a few idle minutes wondering what kind of code she used and how she stored all that knitting! She couldn't have given it away or washed it much. It also can't have been spelling out people's names.

Any ideas?
Yes, lots of them have been floating through my mind while reading comments on this post. Here are a few:

I've got to get a router so I can have Netflix.

I've got to check Madame out, like NOW! I ventured off to do it and didn't learn anything, other than -

I've GOT to read CED! After all, that's Papa's name! Yes! My maternal grandfather's name was Charles Edward Dickens. He descended through CED's brother, William, and both families cross-named. You can find Papa online. He's the CED born in Tremont, ME - married Geneva Ruth Richardson.

Strangely (to ME!), I've not read much of his works and am an avid reader and also an interesting writer - or so I've been told and family say its because I'm 'like HIM' - I'm very quiet - sit and observe, like he used to do. Family legend says he liked to sit at the back of a barroom, watching and listening, and that's where he got his ideas. My excuse for not knowing Madame is the rejection I felt years ago when I requested permission to take a volume of his works the local library had put in a box to be thrown out. Admittedly, that's childish but they knew of my 'connection' and I did feel totally rejected.

Today is the day I'm OVER IT! I'm off to B&N. Bye!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,593 Posts
smasha12 said:
My father used to call me Madame Defarge when he came into my room and found me sitting up in bed knitting.

Remember she used it to keep a record of who should be condemned to death. I've spent quite a few idle minutes wondering what kind of code she used and how she stored all that knitting! She couldn't have given it away or washed it much. It also can't have been spelling out people's names.

Any ideas?
r

Perhaps she knitter the family crest?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,123 Posts
Interesting topic - read this book as a school project and like some KPers wondered how one could knit information into an item. As a French woman, don't doubt she would knit Continental. Will have to re-read, fascinated by the 'tale'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,608 Posts
A little research shows that Morse code was invented in 1836 and the book published in 1859. So, if Mme Defarge were real, she couldn't have knitted in Morse code. But, if Dickens weren't accurate in details, he could have had her knit in Morse code. I like the idea of the coats of arms, but it might need to be more specific as to which member(s) of the family to execute. I need to re-read the book.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top Bottom