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Most brands caution against blocking. I put finished projects in the dryer set on low for 30 minutes. The items come out soft and beautiful. If i feel it's necessary I add a dryer sheet even though i use dryer balls.
 

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The only time I "blocked" an acrylic piece was on a lacey shawl. I pressed it through a wet towel and left it to dry on the towel below. It did open up the lace nicely. Be aware not to let the iron touch the yarn or it will melt. You could knit up a small square and give it a test drive.
 

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It can be blocked if you choose, and once blocked it won't need to be blocked ever again. I use my steam iron held several inches above the piece I'm blocking and keep the iron moving so I'm steaming evenly. When I want to change the character of the yarn, I've steamed directly onto the piece-----did that for a couple rugs. Found out about doing both things on this site............and it does work.
 

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I don't think you can actually block acrylic as such as it will just return to shape once washed. You can however "kill" acrylic by following the method above using the steam. Never let the iron touch your yarn as it will melt.
 

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Before I gift knitted acrylic I want it to be looking its best so I will either:
Cover with damp cloth and leave to dry - I am using this method for a bolero with lacy trim -to ensure it isn't curling.
Put in the washer and dryer - did this with baby blanket. I pin it out as well to make sure its all nice and flat.
Lightly steam with garment steamer - I use this method on blocks before sewing together to make a large blanket.
(If the acrylic is at all scratchy I always give it a little soak in fabric conditioner)
 

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Puddley said:
I don't think you can actually block acrylic as such as it will just return to shape once washed. You can however "kill" acrylic by following the method above using the steam. Never let the iron touch your yarn as it will melt.
There has been a big discussion on this before. There is a big difference between a light steam blocking and 'killing' acrylic. The amount of blocking you need depends on whether you need to manipulate your fabric (open up lace stitches) You certainly need to clean your finished project before passing it along.
 

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hokodah said:
Just finished a scarf using Lion Brand "Heartland" acrylic yarn. I'm not sure if you should block acrylic. Suggestions please.
Thanks
There are safe ways to block acrylic. You can use steam with care not to let an iron or other device come in contact with the fiber. For me, the easiest way is the pin the item into desired shape, spray with ordinary tap water, dry with an ordinary hair dryer. There are dozens of other ways and I'm sure our KP members will have more for you. Most acrylic items don't need blocking. Laundering in luke warm water with fabric softener usually gives you great results. Again, only in items that don't need blocking.
 

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I do not block acrylic, because it does not change its shape when washed as wool or cotton does. But I wash the items I make before I give them away. Then I pin them to a foam or Styrofoam board to dry them. I use Styrofoam heads to dry hats that are large enough. I pin baby hats to a board.
 

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Morningstar2 said:
There are safe ways to block acrylic. You can use steam with care not to let an iron or other device come in contact with the fiber. For me, the easiest way is the pin the item into desired shape, spray with ordinary tap water, dry with an ordinary hair dryer. There are dozens of other ways and I'm sure our KP members will have more for you. Most acrylic items don't need blocking. Laundering in luke warm water with fabric softener usually gives you great results. Again, only in items that don't need blocking.
When I have needed to block an acrylic item, I use a steamer. I like the idea of spraying with tap water then drying with a hair dryer and am going to try it the next time.
 

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Acrylics should be washed and dried by machine on order to retain their shape.
Rolling edges, etc. Should be corrected by the process of knitting.
 

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hokodah said:
Just finished a scarf using Lion Brand "Heartland" acrylic yarn. I'm not sure if you should block acrylic. Suggestions please.
Thanks
I block acrylic items by tossing in the washer, warm water, partially dry, only about 10 to 15 minutes, more to "fluff" then lay flat to finish drying.
 

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If you steam block as Morningstar2 said, you will have to block again after you wash the scarf. If you put your iron directly on the acrylic yarn that is Killing the Acrylic yarn and it changes the texture of the yarn so, I would say to NOT block the the scarf.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thank you for all your help. I should have said I knitted the Irish Hiking Scarf, which is cabled. I will listen to your good advice. I am a slow knitter and thought it would never get done, but here we are!
 
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